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3D craft – Everything is possible!

The Hypercraft show last week was pretty amazing, but what was it like to design a collection on the computer? We interviewed three third year students about their experience with the design programme Lectra.

Article by Jelske Driessen, 2nd year International Fashion & Branding.

 
Monday the 16th of January was a special day for students of the minor 3D hypercraft. It was the day that finalised a semester of hard work and experimenting with the design programme called ‘Lectra’. This software allows designers and managers to skip parts of the pattern-making aspect of design and work digitally. The programme gives an impression of how the design will look like on the body. The students taking part in this minor are asked to come up with a concept and work out their designs in Lectra. Monday the 16th they introduced their collection by showing a short video clip, followed by a runway show presenting their designs.

 

The atmosphere in the Zuiderkerk was quite hectic when I came in. I was very early so the adrenaline from the collection show was still in the air. The church was beautifully lit and very impressive. Near the beginning of the show more and more people came inside. Parents, friends and other AMFI students – all curious about the designs. The Hypercraft show is one to watch for everybody. Seeing the creations which are designed on the computer and to witness what the designers of the future are making is a surprising experience for everybody.
After the 3D-hypercraft event, I interviewed Thijs van der Laan (Design student), Merle Kolman (Design) and Myrna Slagt (Design student).

Can you tell me a what you took as an inspiration for your collection?

Thijs: “My concept started with watching a documentary about the other side of the feminism, it answered the question why men are often seen as more important. This starts with the upbringing of boys and how they are expected to perform well and not show too many emotions. My collection is about a guy who dreams about a world where this is different and where he can also be soft and emotional, like women…”
Myrna: “I never wear my own designs, since we as designers always work with size 34. So I decided to turn it around and design for women with a bigger size from the start. With my lingerie collection I wanted to show that bigger women are also powerful and beautiful.”
Merle: “My inspiration were the dandy’s from the 18th century. These are men who were very fashionable and stylish. I wanted to make a female version of the dandy.”

 

The Dandy inspired collection by Merle Kolman at the shoot (left) and in Lectra (right).

The Dandy inspired collection by Merle Kolman at the shoot (left) and in Lectra (right).

What were your expectations of working with Lectra?
Thijs: “I expected to go way more extreme than I actually did. With Lectra it is so much easier to do this because of the fast alterations you can make. I expected to really challenge the programme, but I ended up using it to perfect the fit and to correctly place the print on the pattern.”
Myrna: “I already worked with the programme. However, I wanted to learn more about it and elaborate it further. I must say it is not really fit for lingerie, because it is not yet developed enough. So that was a challenge I had to experiment with.”
 

The lingerie collection by Myrna Slagt in Lectra and finally worn by a fierce model on the runway.

The lingerie collection by Myrna Slagt in Lectra and finally worn by a fierce model on the runway.

Can you tell me how the Hypercraft minor affected you as a designer?
Thijs: “For me it made it a lot easier to experiment with my designs and create more variations. The programme is also a lot more convenient to work with compared to real life pattern making. It is cleaner, you can make copies, you can alter whenever and whatever you want.”
Merle: “As an intern at G-star I noticed how fast they were able to change the patterns of the clothing. So this was something I wanted to work with during this minor. I felt that for me the programme was quite flat and I also really needed to get used to the fact that I couldn’t feel the texture of the fabric.”
 

Thijs van der Laan and the models wearing his virbrant designs.

Thijs van der Laan and the models wearing his virbrant designs.

How do you think programs like Lectra change the future of design?
Thijs: “Smaller brands that work locally or small ateliers may not really use it yet, but I do think this will change in the future as well. It almost becomes inevitable since fashion changes so fast. Every year a brand gets more seasons and more collections. It also saves workspace, since you only need a computer.”
Merle: “I think that within the world of fast fashion it will be very useful to use the programme. It removes a step and it saves time and money. You can still work very specific like they do with haute couture. Besides that you can also easily change the fabric to see how it looks.”
Myrna: “It quickens the process and it is also a lot more sustainable. However for me it was also quite difficult to distance myself from the tangible process of design. So I do understand how this could be difficult for other designers within brands. But for the future it does make it so much easier to avoid mistakes or change the patterns.”
 

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