3D Hypercraft: pioneers in Fashion Design

Fashion design is a type of sculpting.

The fabric is sculpted into a garment.

– After Frank Zappa (1940-1993)

AMFI’s Lectra Awards is organised annually to recognise talent in fashion design and product development as well as creative exploration of 3D virtual garment prototyping. AMFI is one Lectra’s many educational partners who are helping bridge the technological gap in the field of fashion design. 

3D Hypercraft goes beyond a physical fashion collection to explore virtual garment construction in relation to form, detailing and application. Students investigate groundbreaking pattern making techniques, and how they operate in relation to all of the other variables of a garment within a virtual environment. ‘The freedom to test hypotheses and assumptions has a significant effect on the creative process’, says lecturer Ineke Siersema, who has published research on this very phenomenon. The AMFI Lectra Awards are designed to recognise excellent work and facilitate discussion about design outcomes and experiments.

Personal collection ‘Being’ by Etienne Cootjans.

Fashion Managers completed a technical design collection with a focus on high performance fabrics on assignment from companies, while Fashion Designers created a personal design collection based on a muse or tribe. The twenty-week programme begins with developing paper and Modaris 2D pattern drawing, and interacting with a 3D avatar. Assignments require a physical and virtual study of pattern design, material, fabric drape, details, layering, prints and haberdashery. For example, a designer can test the effects of changing placement of a print, the gauge of a knit, or the width of a seam on the body in real time. Once their virtual pre-collections have been developed, students test properties of their chosen fabrics in the lab. They can then attempt to simulate some of these properties in terms of fit and motion in a virtual space.

Protective rainwear collection for the Ministry of Defense by Sarissa Bong and Jildou Abma.

‘Students who develop their collections with the use of virtually simulated garments have shown that they are able to significantly reduce the number of physical garments and enhance their designs’, says lecturer Sandra Kuipers in her latest research on the potential of 3D technologies.’The reduction of costs and lead times may be an important reason for the fashion industry to implement virtual garment simulation. It can be argued that overproduction and the environmental footprint may be a secondary reason to stress the need to include these new innovations and knowledge based solutions into the fashion cycle.’

Personal Collection – “Trapped in my own mind” by Saskia Fell.

Our 2015 jury for the awards: Inge van Lierop, Senior Fashion Designer at Vlisco; Fashion & Design alumnus and Lichting nominee Lisi Herrebrugh; Isabelle Foucart, Marketing Manager at Lectra; chaired by AMFI’s Peter Leferink. The judges criteria were based on how successfully the available tools were utilised and the extent to which the project shows special ambition or expertise. Sarissa Bong and Jildou Abma won the prize for best technical design collection. Etienne Cootjans took home third, Saskia Fell the runner-up, and Sarah Mayer first prize for best personal design collection. After congratulating the winners, Head of Fashion & Design Leslie Holden remarked: “Your work is a pioneering example for the new generation of fashion industry professionals.”

“Third Planet From the Sun” – Sarah Mayer

Fashion & Design students also created short concept films representing the story behind their collections with content from their creative process. Those who attended their 3D Hypercraft show at Studio K know how remarkable many of these films were. Curious about the collections? Watch the 3D Hypercraft show, click through the 3D Hypercraft photo album or Lectra Awards photo album on Facebook.

Sarah Mayer’s pattern and simulation.