Events – AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Tue, 18 Sep 2018 10:55:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 AMFI NEXT GRADUATE PROFILES – Part Two http://amfi.nl/amfi-next-graduate-profiles-part-two/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 11:05:24 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19658 Written by Elizabeth Thomas   Graduation is over! The very final step of our students AMFI career has come to an end but marks the beginning of a new chapter. […]

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Written by Elizabeth Thomas

 
Graduation is over! The very final step of our students AMFI career has come to an end but marks the beginning of a new chapter. We sat down with 6 graduates for one last time to reflect on their time here and what is to come in the future.
 
Name Marlies Reukers
 
Department Fashion & Design
 
Best AMFI experience Hypercraft! It was where my digital fascination came out and found what I really wanted to do. Possibly an even better experience would be my exchange to New Zealand.
 
Biggest reality check Being confronted with my own perfectionism. I really want to strive for the best so I put the bar high for myself which is a good and bad thing. It’s all part of the learning process for me.
 
Internship Damien Ravn, a Norwegian designer based in Antwerp. It was very focussed on technical design and pattern making. He makes these crazy constructions and I’m a really technical designer so I really wanted to learn more about it.
 
Graduation project Focussing on virtual design, Marlies created her own collection in the digital world creating everything digitally and then physically as well. ‘For me it wasn’t complete without the physical garments, I think thats the whole interesting party about translating virtual garments to physical garments. There are many things that can go wrong in that step so in the end it was like making 2 collections at the same time which was stressful but I’m very glad I did it because I learned so much in my last semester at AMFI.’
 
Looking at how to optimise comfort and implementing freedom of movement in different constructions she used only block patterns without  any side seams or shoulder seams. Instead her seams go all around the body according to the body to improve dynamics and listen to the body.
 

Plans for near future I’m going to work at PVH and I’m still developing my own work as well by entering into competitions.

Virtual render in Daz (avatar) and Clo (clothing), merged in Photoshop 1
 
Inge Tiemens - photoshoot 5

Photography by Inge Tiemans and Virtual rendering by Marlies Reukers

 


 

Name Kim Schoenmakers
 
Department Fashion & Management
 
Best AMFI experience The fact that you get so many possibilities to go on exchange and build your network internationally. AMFI also has a lot of connections with large and small brands so you really have a lot of opportunities here.
 
Biggest reality check My internship. At AMFI you learn how to implement everything but in real life you realise how needed the skills are that you have learned. The stress level in the fashion industry is pretty high so it when I received positive reactions at Adidas about how I work under pressure it clear how AMFI prepared me. What AMFI taught me and a lot of us is that you have to keep going and know how to deal with stress.
 
Internship I did my internship at Adidas working as a product developer in their outdoor department specific to sports performance. I worked a lot together with the management and design department which gave me a broad view to the possibilities within such a company like Adidas. It actually brought me to my future goal which is to do a masters to be a part of their future team who look at 5-10 year goals.
 
Graduation project Kim explored how to enhance the consumer experience in brick and mortar stores through 3D virtual garment presentation. She had the ultimate goal to digitise the fashion industry from concept to consumer (focussing on 3D/VR/AR). Starting over a year ago during the minor 3D hypercraft, Kim worked together with designer Marlies in implementing 3D virtual designs with real life consumer experiences.
 
Plans for near future I’m going to do my masters in Strategic and Innovation Management now in Groningen for 2 years, and write my thesis on Adidas with the end goal of working there.
 
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Virtual rendering by Kim Schoenmakers

 


 

Name Eva Lancere de kam
 
Department Fashion & Management
 
Best AMFI experience A collection of the inspiring excursion trips we went on to Berlin, Paris and Istanbul. My best experiences happened during the flexible program where I specialized as the General Manager of iNDiViDUALS GEN24. These international trips and experiences showed me the diversity of the fashion industry.
 
Biggest reality check The start of AMFI! I was one of the youngest students at AMFI I was always determined to study International Fashion Management and become a product developer.  As I’ve been told, success begins with two beliefs: That the future can be better than the present, and that you have the power to make it so.
 
Internship I was assistant product developer at luxury brand ROKSANDA. There I experienced the intriguing and fast pace high end fashion environment, working on collections showed during London Fashion Week.
 
Graduation project By researching 3D body scanning Eva enhances the online shopping experience. The innovation behind 3D body scanning is embedded in the way we perceive and derive body measurements. In an expanding digital world this technology is expected to develop near and farina the mid to high end fashion segment resulting in a more sustainable fashion environment, transparent and responsive customer centered approach.
 
Plans for near future I will study a masters and continue specializing in strategic management and 3D product development for luxury fashion brands and am open for suiting projects and job opportunities to put my knowledge into action.
 
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Eva Lancere de Kams final exposition

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AMFI NEXT GRADUATE PROFILES – Part One http://amfi.nl/amfi-next-graduate-profiles-part-one/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 10:48:53 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19647 Written by Elizabeth Thomas   Graduation is over! The very final step of our students AMFI career has come to an end but marks the beginning of a new chapter. […]

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Written by Elizabeth Thomas

 
Graduation is over! The very final step of our students AMFI career has come to an end but marks the beginning of a new chapter. We sat down with 6 graduates for one last time to reflect on their time here and what is to come in the future.
 
Name Katja Mihalova
 
Department Fashion & Branding
 
Internship I did my internship at LTH JKT LA. When I started there it was a start up company and when I left everything was up and running which was great to see.
 
Graduation project The Cool Fool Starter Pack is a creative approach on merchandising recording artist Gus Dapperton. Upon realising there was a disconnect between Gus Dapperton and his fan base, Katja developed a campaign that brings this artist to life in more ways than one. In collaboration with Goodwill and used clothing, she produced a sustainable and fashionable You’ll never want to be ordinary ever again.
 
Best AMFI experience The visual culture minor, the process of making a fashion video was really great because it’s not very often have that opportunity to mix fashion and film.
 
Biggest reality check during AMFI Embracing sleepless nights! And developing an eye for detail working up to the industry standard.
 
Plans for the near future I’m looking into working in Peru for Raymisa and further developing myself in film and as an art director.
 
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Katja Mihalovas final exposition, photography by Selwyn Evers

 


 

Name Justus Benjamin de Jong
 
Department Fashion & Branding
 
Internship I did my internship at Wink, an experimental advertisement agency and concept developer.
 
Best AMFI experience My Graduation project for sure. I enjoyed every single moment. My advice to give anyone who is about to partake in this project, is to choose something that is very near and personal to you. And also something that everyone will know so they can give their own value to the brand.
 
Biggest reality check during AMFI Don’t make things too complex, go to the core and ask yourself the question “what do I want to tell?”. You have to be careful you don’t get tunnel vision.
 
Graduation project Techstyles is a modular line extension to LEGO wear. It is designed by taking the future into consideration, focussing on generation Alpha by encouraging children to learn as they play and stimulate them to explore their own identity and style. ‘Bring a lego character to life. Nowadays children wish to be batman and superman, but with this product they can be super batman.
 
Plans for near future Pitching this research project to LEGO in Denmark!
 
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concept by Joost, photography by Christopher Pugmire

 


 

Name Layla Brizzio Brentar and Natalie Boeri van der Zee
 
Department Fashion & Design
 
Best AMFI experience Graduation! Because we got to do it together and got to do something we really wanted to do with a lot more liberty. There are no rules set for graduation as long as you make a statement and prove the relevance and your intentions. Then you have more wiggle room as long as you are convincing. It was a nice experience to do it together, it was the dream from the beginning. We got so much done together that for graduation it was a huge success and we enjoyed the process a lot. Sometimes when you’re working alone and you hit a wall you don’t know how to go further, but if you have someone else there you never really get stuck if you have that support.
 
Biggest reality check during AMFI I think right now after graduation. We’re not really students anymore, what now?
 
Internship Layla did her internship at Totem in Bali  Natali did hers at Chalayan in London
 
Graduation project A lot is a brand that develops mirrored collections out of sustainable and overstock materials. It’s starting point was sustainability viewed by a street wear approach that addresses a child of the world. The girls believe sustainability should be a given and at the core of the idea not just an extra. And that it should be cool! Though a statement on sustainability is just as important this dynamic duo wanted to make it more approachable so people could relate to it in a special way.
 
Plans for near future We’re open to new projects as a duo and working with new brands and designers and trying to find solutions to the problems they have. Sustainability is such a heavy word now for brands but we want to push forward the idea of having fun with it.
 
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Layla and Nathalies final collection, photography by Matt Parfitt

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A conversation with Garment http://amfi.nl/a-conversation-with-garment/ Tue, 26 Jun 2018 08:32:11 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19536 On June 22 the Garment family gathered with three industry professionals and some interesting minds to talk all about [mis]suiting. At 21:15, our dear Editor in Chief -a.k.a. talk master-, […]

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On June 22 the Garment family gathered with three industry professionals and some interesting minds to talk all about [mis]suiting. At 21:15, our dear Editor in Chief -a.k.a. talk master-, Emma-Chase Laflamme, entered the stage to open the conversation and introduced our guests.

 

A submission from the Garment editorial team. Text by Celia Marie Freiling.

 

GEORGETTE_KLEIN

 

‘I am my magazine.’ – Georgette Koning

 

Her career began as a jewelry designer and she actually never aspired to start a magazine, until she started writing. After working for fashion magazines like Vogue and L’Officiel, Georgette Koning made the step and published her own magazine: Mirror Mirror.

 

Mirror Mirror is an independent beauty magazine from Amsterdam that is mostly about images. For Georgette, beauty is the starting point in both editorial and photographic content. Instead of working for a brand, she is the brand. Her drive to create and her hunger for images is visible on every page of the magazine.

 

‘On average, people look at an image in a magazine for one second’, says Georgette. Her goal is to make it three.

 

NENA_KLEIN

 

‘Selling air?! That’s something I’m good at!’ – Nena van Veen

 

Starting as an intern at Glamour, Nena got what every girl dreams of after watching The Devil Wears Prada: a job at Vogue. After studying economics and being used to boring numbers, she became an international sales manager at the Dutch Vogue. But the fashion world turned out to be totally different from what she had expected.


Nena didn’t feel good about selling, when a magazine should be there to inspire. That was when tech giant Samsung asked her to work for them in their air conditioning business. ‘At first I was shocked, but then I thought, selling air?! That’s something I’m good at!

 

So there she was, walking into a male dominated world with her Chanel bag. ‘The way of dressing is really different at Samsung, and in the beginning I tried to adapt, but now I’m true to myself and dress the way I would also dress at Vogue’.

 

3 years ago Nena set foot into Gucci as an employee for Vogue, now they are her clients at Samsung. Yes, also luxury fashion brands need air conditioning. You could say that Nena found her very own niche in the tech industry by staying herself.

 

SOFIEGOED_KLEIN

 

‘The fashion and healthcare industry should have a conversation.’ – Sofie van der Meulen

 

Sofie was born with a rare genetic mutation that affected her growth: the bone growth disorder SEDC. Being 1.40 m, she literally misfits the fashion industry and the standardised system.

 

‘Finding clothes is a miracle, mostly I get really frustrated’, she says. Nothing fits and everything needs to be adjusted; there is a lack of inclusive fashion that takes the differences of people into consideration and Sofie is confronted with this issue every time she goes shopping.

 

It’s often forgotten that people with disabilities want to look fashionable as well. Sitting in a wheelchair, like Sofie had to for a long time, becomes part of your everyday life and thus your everyday attire. Instead of looking like a medical device, the wheelchair should express your personality as much as a dress you decide to wear.

 

‘I really think the fashion and healthcare industry should have a conversation, because they could profit from each other. It’s about connecting functionality with beauty’, said Sofie whilst wearing a short black and white dress with red sneakers – a bold statement, and we love it.

 

Our industry professionals could not have been more different from each other, yet still they all shared the same message in the end: in order to be successful you have to be yourself and that means to [mis]suit from time to time.

 

You can find more information about Garment magazine and the Fashion & Editorial Branding minor at www.garmentmagazine.com.

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Prestigious Prizes for AMFI Alumni Lisi and Sarah http://amfi.nl/prestigious-prizes-amfi-alumni-lisi-sarah/ Wed, 09 May 2018 09:17:30 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19463 During the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography, not one, but two AMFI alumni were rewarded with a prestigious prize. The festival is, since the business for several designers […]

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During the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography, not one, but two AMFI alumni were rewarded with a prestigious prize. The festival is, since the business for several designers attending became booming, one of those “must visits” for the fashion industry. Some even say that what the Cannes Film Festival is for the movie industry, Hyères is for those who can count themselves as the best of the best within the fashion fields.

 

The contest became even more important – for the Dutchies at least – when Victor & Rolf were praised for their collection and received an award. But Hyères is not only an important contest for all who want to make it in fashion, it’s also one of the oldest festivals where fashion is the main topic. The first edition took place in 1985 and ever since, the main goal of the Festival is to encourage young (and old!) creatives to show their unique vision on fashion and the world in general!

 

 

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This year, the prize of the City of Hyères, or better known as the Hyères audience award, went to “our own” Sarah Bruylant for her 19th century pointillist inspired collection with gracious, bright but big balloon-shaped dresses.

 

The Première Vision Grand Prize, went to designer duo BOTTER, or separately known as Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh. You might recognize the name Lisi Herrebrugh, because she also is an AMFI alumni. BOTTER’s menswear collection was inspired by the mutual heritage of Botter and Herrebrugh (Caribbean) and pointed out cultural and environmental issues poured into colorful designs with a good doses of humor. The collection was bright, innovative and styled to perfection. Please notice the nice addition of inflatable toys, fishnets and (S)hell logos for making a statement concerning climate change, global warming and other –most worrying- earth issues. Not only is this message actual and touching, the message is also very human and real. BOTTER receives, among many other prizes, 15,000 euros and is going to collaborate with Chanel’s Métiers d’Art division.

 

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“Individualism is so passé” http://amfi.nl/individualism-is-so-passe/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 17:11:10 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19423 When somebody from the audience speaks up…and everybody suddenly has a moment to breathe, to hide the sudden uncertainty that is slowly creeping up in everybody. At the MOW exhibition […]

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When somebody from the audience speaks up…and everybody suddenly has a moment to breathe, to hide the sudden uncertainty that is slowly creeping up in everybody. At the MOW exhibition at the ByAMFI Store past Saturday, this instance was quickly swept away by an AMFI lecturer who applauded and payed respect to the student body for the future driven thoughts they have been sharing. Nobody expected the discussion to be as connecting as it finally turned out. Students as well as the industry professionals engaged into a discussion about the changing industry and the increasing value of collaboration.

 

Article by second Year International Fashion & Management Student Annika Langhammer.

 

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The organisation team of the MOW exhibition. Photography by Ecaterina Vasilieva.

 

Besides a lot of critique on the current educational system as well as the broken industry, light has been shining on topics such as existing collaborative initiatives. According to Agnes, a third year branding student at AMFI, there are already strong examples in the industry. She has been part of the Copenhagen Fashion Summit and sees a huge potential in collaboration to empower each other to collectively strive for the better.

 

Yennhi, a second year Fashion & Management student, shared her experience from her participation in the Creative Women Collective in Amsterdam. Through organised events, especially women can meet like-minded people and learn as well as grow together. It is incredible how women from different industries can meet each other there, and instead of competing with each other, collaborate to become stronger.

 

Platforms to reach out and connect do exist in great numbers and are already embedded in our daily lives. Looking at Instagram for example, many of us use it, but more to showcase our lives and what inspires us. Therefore, the way of using these platforms needs to be changed. Up until now, it has not been taken full advantage of the purpose of these platforms.  It is on each of us whether we use this opportunity, but the base for collaboration is already set.

 

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Photography Ecaterina Vasilieva.

 

Everybody who was present at the ByAMFI Store on Saturday felt the urge for change. We are the next generation entering the industry and we strive for a collective change. MOW generated a great platform to realise the power of collaboration which will be essential to collectively strive for the future we imagine. Collaboration is a process that happens organically, which should not scare us of to take initiative in our daily lives.

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Lights ON! Spotlight on Creative Processes http://amfi.nl/lights-spotlight-creative-processes/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 17:05:15 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19417 Last Saturday the MOW exhibition drew many curious visitors to the ByAMFI Store. Three students from Branding, Design and Management showcased their creative process in projects besides and within AMFI. […]

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Last Saturday the MOW exhibition drew many curious visitors to the ByAMFI Store. Three students from Branding, Design and Management showcased their creative process in projects besides and within AMFI.  Their work was presented in engaging wall-covering process book-like installations. Videos invited visitors to listen to the driving forces behind the creation process. Live illustrations captured visitors and allowed a personal experience of art creation first hand. The highlight of the day, were three panel discussions which gave insight into thoughts and struggles behind the creation process as well as their ambition from a young professional within the fashion industry. For those who were not able to come, the organisational team of the exhibition made sure that it was streamed on Instagram Live Stories.

 

Article by second Year International Fashion & Management Student Annika Langhammer.

 

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Strong female lead at the first panel discussion at MOW! Photography by Ecaterina Vasilieva.

 

Not only did the artsy installations gave a look behind the scenes, but even more personal insight was given during the first panel discussion of the day. Different topics, such as the emotional process, struggles and self-exploration as a way of self-expression, have been touched on.

 

How to start a working process? Find the abstract space and transform it into something tangible. According to Ksenia, second year designer student, designing is an emotional process which will finally be expressed through emotional exhibitionism. Her designs are a pure show of emotions presented without any shame. For her, the source of inspiration clearly is derived from the same abstract space, no matter if you are a technical or a creative person.

 

Other members of the panel agreed that emotions do play a big role in a creative process. It is especially important to be emotionally attached to the starting point of your project as that will be your driving force when encountering issues along the way. Magda, a second year branding student, talked about her experiences of encountering disappointments during the process. She learned to value the importance of mistakes due to a great source of inspiration. They serve as a trigger for even more creative energy which lead to a stronger end product. Especially the hard moments during the project will give you so much more in the end.

 

Another interesting point that came up during the panel discussion was creating products without having the means that students sometimes would love to have. Result: that would simply be too easy and a lot of our creativity would be wasted. Asher, a second year design student, considers the lack of money as an exciting challenge as he enjoys the beauty of the limitation. That is what ultimately triggers the creative process and in the long run will also support sustainable thinking. Ksenia said: ‘Another person’s trash becomes my treasure’.

 

The exhibition turned out to be a big success and definitely kicked off the urge for further inspirational and interactive events. Let’s see what comes up next… STAY EXCITED is the hint we, as the Amfi.nl Team, can give you!!

 

MOW_Collageklein

Collage by Annika Langhammer. Photography by Ecaterina Vasilieva.

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“More than dressing well and shopping” http://amfi.nl/dressing-well-shopping/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 17:37:31 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19391 Almost every AMFI student has already been confronted with the stereotypes that fashion students are often associated with. But we all know that fashion universities are much more than places […]

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Almost every AMFI student has already been confronted with the stereotypes that fashion students are often associated with. But we all know that fashion universities are much more than places where we only talk about dressing and shopping. Instead, fashion schools, such as AMFI, provide an inspiring working environment where lots of diverse talents work together and share their unique ideas. 

 

Second year Fashion and Branding student Esther Kroes showcases this diversity of fashion students. In her exhibition “MOW – Manner of Working”, which will take place at the byAMFI studio this Saturday, the 14th of April, she offers us an insight into the passionate creative working process and vision of 40 AMFI students. Today, I had the chance to meet Esther and talk with her about the idea behind this exhibition and her own motivation. 

 

Article by first year International Fashion & Branding student Janna Hämpke.

 

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Esther Kroes by Ecaterina Vasilieva, second year Fashion and Branding student.

 

Hi Esther, thank you for coming and taking your time for this interview just a few days before the exhibition. I would love to know more about the background of this exhibition. What did inspire you to organise it? 

I started with this project when I worked for amfi.nl as a social media editor. I came up with the idea to photograph AMFI students to showcase their personal world and show what they look like. The idea was to break through the stereotypical visions of AMFI students. On instagram, I asked AMFI students if they would like to present their outfit of the day, and other students to take photos of them. The first photographer I worked with was Anna Dovgopolaya, a first year Fashion and Design student. While the first project was going on, I saw the photos of Anna and I was surprised by the high quality of her work – everything looked so good. I was convinced that I have to do more with these amazing photos. So I got the idea to showcase them in an exhibition. I talked to Flora van den Berg, the editor-in-chief of amfi.nl and the guys from the byAMFI studio and we made the decision to organise an exhibition in collaboration with byAMFI. That was the start of this project. With the help and creative energy of four Editorial team members of amfi.nl, Emma Smit, Leonie Miller-Aichholz, Marissa Muijselaar and Zoë Akihary, I finally created the exhibition during the last month. So, my very first idea turned out into a big collaboration.

 

How would you describe the core idea of the final exhibition? 

First, the core idea was to showcase the diversity of AMFI students. But then I decided to focus on their thoughts and ambition as well. In the end, the exhibition is all about showcasing the process of creating thinking of AMFI students.  I want to highlight their vision, mission, and passion, as I think that these are the key drivers for successful work. The most important thing of a person is their energy, their spirit, their ambition, their thinking process and not specifically their skills. You can always develop your skills over time but your energy and your vision are the things which are the fuel to start with. And that’s exactly what I want to present in the exhibition. Moreover, I want to create a networking event where AMFI students can meet up and see what other students’ potentials are. I also would like to show the talents of fashion students to the outside world. We, as fashion students, are more than dressing well and shopping. I think that we are diverse creative thinkers who have a passion for a broad variety of subjects and who love to research, explore the world around us and to educate ourselves. It is time to showcase that diversity and our distinctive energetic characteristics !

 

Would you mind giving us a small glimpse into the program of Saturday? 

On Saturday, we will organise some panel discussions about the creative working process, creative thinking and the competitiveness of the fashion industry. We would like to connect students to each other and to show the world where our true potentials are and what keeps us going on. Some AMFI students will give us a glimpse into their way of thinking and into their way of managing their own work. We also showcase their personal process they do besides AMFI on the walls. Some of them are already creative directors or brand directors and it is interesting to see how they manage their creative process. The focus of the exhibition lies on showcasing the creative process behind the end result – something that is hardly discussed while there is put so much energy, effort and emotions in. We also display a video where five AMFI students talk about their vision, mission and their point of view on competitiveness in the fashion industry. Moreover, we will publish a magazine which deals with the personal story of 40 AMFI students. Saturday will be a nice time to meet each other and to talk to each other. We want to show that we are talented colleagues, not competitors. We showcase the beauty of working together on an emotional and creative level! There is a DJ, there are drinks and hopefully, there is a great atmosphere. Everybody is welcome to join us.

 

The exhibition “MOW- Manner of Working” will take place at the byAMFI store on Saturday, the14th of April, from 12am to 9pm.

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Technology is transforming the fashion industry http://amfi.nl/technology-transforming-fashion-industry/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 12:07:39 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19383 Encouraged by the growing interest of industry and students in the combination of digital and physical creation, AMFI and the Lectoraat of Fashion&Technology organised the event “Hybrid Fashion Symposium” on […]

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Encouraged by the growing interest of industry and students in the combination of digital and physical creation, AMFI and the Lectoraat of Fashion&Technology organised the event “Hybrid Fashion Symposium” on Thursday the 29th March.

 

Article by Melina Pfaff, first year International Fashion & Management student and Esther Kroes, second year International Fashion & Branding student.

 

Within the framework of an inspirational and interactive day, the Swedish fashion company Atacac presented their thoughts on new ways to design, sell and produce in order to digitalise the fashion world. Moreover, AMFI students explained their work and experiments with 3D design as well as their opinions on the challenges and possibilities of technical development in the fashion industry. The event offered a lot of space to discuss and exchange ideas and visions with each other, and gave the possibility to participate in workshops about Creative Thinking and Kinetic Garment Construction, led by Jimmy Herdberg and Rickhard Lindqvist, the founders of Atacac.  

 

The fashion world is changing. Technological advances are being pushed to the limit. New developments provoke to think outside the box in order to come up with new solutions. The company Atacac is exploring the borderline between the virtual and the physical garment.

 

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Presentation from Atacac.

 

Jimmy Herdberg’s background as a digital creative combined with Rickhard Lindqvist’s development of Kinetic Garment Construction, an alternative model to the static pattern making matrix, offers to explore new possibilities in the field of fashion and technology. They see their company as an ongoing fashion experiment – a laboratory to provide research free for everyone to benefit from it.

 

With the help of their software programme CLO, they are able to virtually shift designs, including their physical properties of fabric, to our screens in three-dimensional appearance. When Rickhard Lindqvist and Jimmy Herdberg founded Atacac, they aimed to make the digital world more attractive. Following they came up with new ways to display garments online. By adding movement and music to the avatars, which show their clothing online, they succeeded in presenting the digital fashion world in a very innovative and creative way. Besides their ideas on presenting garments, they also came up with completely new ways on how to produce, price and sell items.

 

Atacac presents a specific business model, including local manufacturing with short production cycles and on demand production. By offering the possibility to pre-order items on their website for a cheaper price, they can limit overproduction and stock keeping and thereby enable transparency and sustainability.

 

Bring your own lunch and share your thoughts (1)

Bring your own lunch and share your thoughts.

 

The Amfi students Marlies Reukers, Kim Schoenmakers, Marjolijn Ebbers and Franziska Hilbert are also experimenting with the possibilities of 3D experiences. Marlies explained how she discovered a new way of working during the Hypercraft/VR-Experience minor and how technology enables to experiment with the ways of presenting garments. Kim focused on the response of consumers on the integration of the digital experiences in physical stores. Marjolijn talked about her work in the field of product development in 3D sampling, where she specialised in knitwear, whilst Franziska researches the impact and implementation of 3D body scanning within the fashion industry.

 

They all see huge possibilities of improvement and development of the future fashion world.

 

3D technologies come with a lot of benefits, such as production savings regarding time as well as textile waste and pollution. Nevertheless, there are some questions remaining. Is the customer ready for the new virtual shopping experience? Which kinds of opportunities do come with it, especially regarding career and education? And how does technology challenge the existing structures of the fashion industry?

 

The Atacac founders see it as the biggest challenge for online stores to increase online sales and at the same time decrease returns. The students explained that garments often do not look the same in real-life as they are presented online. Moreover every garment looks different on everyone and the fit can turn out differently than expected. This is the reason why Atacac is currently working on ideas how they can offer customers to try on garments virtually when shopping online.

 

Furthermore, the students talked about the customer’s experience when shopping online and the role of the brick-and-mortar stores in the future. They observed the current development of people being more and more online than ever before. Following they see the importance for a company to sell where the people are – online. The Atacac founders aim to create a better experience virtually than physically, because they claim that people nowadays are getting less interested in material things in general. People are more into technology – fashion will become technology.

 

Even though online shopping is really convenient and technical developments constantly improve the online shopping experience, Kim mentioned that face-to-face retail still has the advantage of the tactile experience and the physical relationship between product and consumer. In this regard brick-and-mortar stores might get the function of a museum.

 

All present AMFI students talked about the endless possibilities which their creative work offered – a new career perspective as well as the freedom of developing their interest and strengthen their identity. They feel the urge to set out their path on their own whilst exploring the hybrid world of technology and fashion. According to them, the role as a professional in the future of fashion can completely depend on who you are as an individual, your working process, your experiments and ideas. Technology, AR as well as VR experiences, will have huge impact on future developments. The students suggest being open-minded and teaming up with people from all specialties in order to grow and develop within the industry.  

 

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Presentation from the workshop Kinetic Garment Construction.

 

During the afternoon of the event, the Atacac founders invited to take part in two workshops – one on Creative thinking and one on Kinetic garment construction. The Creativity workshop led by Jimmy Herdberg concentrated on creative problem solving using the ‘Six Hat Method’. The method helps to look at problems from all points of view – Information, Optimism, Judgement, Feelings, Creativity, Thinking. This practice forced everyone to move outside their habitual thinking style and helped to learn new ways of opening the mind to new solutions. Additionally the workshop participants discussed new ways to experience virtuality combined with reality and talked about ideas, such as touching fabric with your eyes.

 

The other workshop led by Rickhard Lindqvist focussed on his innovation of Kinetic garment construction, an alternative pattern cutting method using as its point of origin the actual body instead of a static matrix. Within this workshop, participants draped one rectangular piece of fabric and worked with the variable body as well as the direction of the skin to create garments. They combined movements and breaking points of the body in order to create patterns based on how the body works. During discussions, the students agreed, that this way of pattern making should be introduced in the early stages of design degrees as an alternative to traditional pattern cutting and that designers, pattern cutters and developer will have to come together and collaborate into more technical directions.

 

During the Hybrid Fashion Symposium event, Atacac provided us with a glimpse of advanced technical developments, which have huge potential to be evolved in the future. AMFI students demonstrated what kind of impressive projects may emerge when the creative side as well as the technical and commercial one come together. On demand production and Virtual and Augmented Reality promise a more innovative and more sustainable world. Atacac has great plans for the future of fashion technology and aspires to further develop the physical as well as the virtual combination of product and experience. In fact, the increasingly personal nature of online shopping is going to create a new challenge for retailers – and a new opportunity.

We will open our eyes for new ideas and diversity. Technology is transforming the fashion industry.

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Triptych 2018: “Always have an open mind.” http://amfi.nl/triptych-2018-always-open-mind/ Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:00:42 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19303 Three departments, 10 groups and three weeks. A few weeks ago the second year students of AMFI went on the rollercoaster called ‘Triptych”. Everyone approached the project in a different […]

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Three departments, 10 groups and three weeks. A few weeks ago the second year students of AMFI went on the rollercoaster called ‘Triptych”. Everyone approached the project in a different way, and had different experiences and learning moments. Reporter Zoë Akihary spoke to Wes, a second year Fashion & Branding student about his experience.

 

Article by Zoë Akihary.

 

Could you tell us a little bit about yourself and something you expected to learn from Triptych?

My name is Wes and I’m a Fashion & Branding student. Beforehand I heard a lot of experiences and stories about Triptych, but I approached the project with an open mind. We had a very nice group with clear communication, which was great. I wanted to have a leading role during the project, because I’m normally more on the background waiting for something to happen. I like doing my own thing. But by working in a big group, I learned that I’m able to be a good leader. That was something I hadn’t tried before, so it was interesting for me to see what is was like to turn my way of working around. By doing so I developed my communication, organisation and leading skills.

 

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Wes developing his photography and visualisation skills during Triptych. He’d love to do the minor Fashion & Visual Culture next year.

 

What was a surprising element in the process of the project?

I didn’t expect that the communication could be so clear within such a big group. Everyone respected each other and had an open mind towards their peers. Besides that, I found it very important that everyone did something they felt comfortable with, or had the chance to develop themselves in certain areas they wanted to. That’s eventually what this project is all about; to focus on other aspects of the fashion industry and have the freedom to develop yourself.

 

What was your role during Triptych?

What I have learned during Triptych is to listen to other people. I have developed my English skills by speaking to others a lot. It was also very interesting to see the development of a concept from someone else’s perspective, which was very inspiring.During the project I learned how important clear communication is, because everything has to be in one line, in order to come up with a consistent brand DNA. A tip: Always explain to the rest of your group what you are doing. Other than that, I was mostly responsible for the concept, brand book and visualisation.

 

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Group 2 ‘Catalyst’: a great dynamic between the branders, managers and designers.

 

All second year students explore the options for the flexibele programme in the third and fourth year. Were you able to use Triptych as a starting point for the upcoming two years?

First I didn’t really have a clue which direction I wanted to go in, in the flexible program, but during Triptych I have realised that I’m very interested in visual communication and conceptual photography. I find photography and film very interesting as well as communicating a certain message through visuals.

The feedback we got back from the teachers on our concept, was that, without explanation needed, it really stood out compared to the other concepts. This made me realise that our brand was indeed visualised very well, and that that is what I’m good at.

 

If you look back at the past three weeks. Was there something you would have done differently?

The communication between 25 people went quite well most of the time, but we took all decisions together. Next time it’d be better to choose three ‘decision-takers’ of each department, three students who are very involved so we can cut off the ends much quicker. Besides that, I’d give the tip to investigate the remaining two departments beforehand so you can be much more understanding and open-minded towards their contribution!

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An account of Triptych in analogue http://amfi.nl/account-triptych-analogue/ Wed, 14 Feb 2018 07:32:02 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19251 For reporter Emma Smit was Triptych 2018 a way to explore her passion for analogue photography, as she captured the entire a process on a disposable camera.   Images and […]

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For reporter Emma Smit was Triptych 2018 a way to explore her passion for analogue photography, as she captured the entire a process on a disposable camera.

 

Images and article by Emma Smit.

 

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After the concepting phase of Triptych, the branders sit together with the fashion managers and designers to carefully explain and discuss conceptual starting points. Open communication is very important when creating a consistent brand identity. After everyone is up to date and ready to get their hands dirty, the designers start sewing the garments. The stress is on.

 

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Here are some branders doing some intense research into the minds of Frida Kahlo and Miley Cyrus. Triptych 2018 was all about finding inspiration in the lives and work of two icons. Brand distinctiveness is requisite when attracting your audience. This is why analysing and deconstructing their motivations can be a very tedious, but interesting process.

 

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After finding some conceptual starting points for our brand, we started analysing the images. Moodboards are the necessary building blocks when it comes to visually communicating your ideas. Practice makes perfect. Here are some of the students from The Tv is Off deconstructing some conclusions and giving feedback on each other’s moodboards.

 

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Developing a logo is very exciting. Triptych teaches students how to work collaboratively, while still being friendly and looking at things with constructive criticism. Here we see some branders agreeing on a logo they came up with. Seeing hard work come to life puts a smile on everyone’s faces.

 

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Students from management, design and branding all come together to make Triptych a night to remember. We teach and help each other with the things we have learned over the last 2 years at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute. By bringing diverse opinions together we strengthen our collaboration skills which will qualify us for the real world.

 

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The designers spent all night and day working to get the outfits done. They know what hard work feels like. Whilst shooting the images to further enhance the brand identity, the designers get to see their garments come to life.

 

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Experimenting, sketching and discussing, is something students at AMFI know all too well. Here we see students discussing the final details before starting to sew the garments. Colours, extravagant patterns and using the correct fabrics can make or break a look.

 

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The students create a concept, design the garments, make them and then of course plan the photoshoot. Here we see some students deciding on hair and make-up that fits their visual identity. Elba van den Heuvel models for The Tv is Off brand photoshoot. Designers tend to her to make the outfits look magical. After Triptych, this garment will be recycled and guaranteed a second life.

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