Projects – AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Tue, 17 Jul 2018 15:04:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Hong Kong Diaries #1: Sarah Slingsby http://amfi.nl/hong-kong-diaries-1-sarah-slingsby/ Mon, 07 May 2018 18:43:15 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19456 In our Hong Kong diaries we’ll meet three Fashion & Management students during their specialisation semester in Hong Kong & China. Here, they’ll write about their time spent abroad, share […]

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In our Hong Kong diaries we’ll meet three Fashion & Management students during their specialisation semester in Hong Kong & China. Here, they’ll write about their time spent abroad, share some tips and knowledge about the Hong Kong culture and the specialisation itself. This week International Fashion & Management student Sarah Slingsby (21 years old) talks about her first month in Hong Kong.

 

Article by third year Fashion & Branding student An-Sofie Vandecruys.

 

Why did you choose for the specialisation ‘International Production’?

When I applied for AMFI I already saw the possibility of going to China within the flexible program, and I immediately thought of this as a great opportunity. I find Chinese culture and its art very inspiring, and visiting this country would give me so much life experience. However, I wasn’t sure at that time what I wanted to specialize in later, so I just kept it in the very back of my mind. When I realised during the second year that I wanted to focus on production, I thought this specialisation would be a once in a lifetime chance and an opportunity I should grab with both hands.

 

Management students in Hong Kong

The management students in Hong Kong.

 

What did you do in the first phase of the specialisation?

The specialisation starts off with three weeks of preparation at AMFI, including a one-week WRAP course, presentations on both a Chinese topic and the company you are placed at, and Chinese Mandarin lessons. After this there is one week of transfer to Hong Kong. Here you will start off with four weeks of Chinese language & culture classes at PolyU before starting at your company.

 

How is studying at the PolyU?

The campus is beautiful – however a bit confusing in the beginning – and has great facilities. Our teachers at the PolyU are master students who want to become Chinese Mandarin teachers for foreigners. It is great that while you learn a lot from them, they also learn a lot from you. Both from an educational point of view, as well as personally and culturally. The classes are quite serious in China; you can not be late, eat in class or lack participation. However, the teachers are incredibly nice and love to talk to you about their favourite restaurants in Hong Kong, their hometowns and where to go shopping.

 

meeting local people

Meeting the locals.

 

What do you do in class?

The classes are mainly from 09:30 – 12:20 and always start with reviewing the previous class, then learning new grammar and words and end with a drill (which means speaking the words over and over again until we pronounce them right). Once a week we have culture classes on food, music, drama and fashion. We also visit a museum twice. There is no homework, except reviewing previous and following classes, so there is enough free time to explore the city. There are three tests in total, which do require some studying, but the teachers prepare you very well, so there is absolutely no need to stress about this.

 

What are the main differences between AMFI and the PolyU?

The biggest difference for me is how the Chinese handle time. 5 minutes before the start of class we would have to start Whatsapping our classmates where they are and you would need a good reason to be late or miss class. Also, the classes always end right on the exact minute. We would repeat words until class is officially over, never too early. I would say that AMFI is more relaxed, informal and chaotic. I feel like the PolyU is very well structured.

 

How is Hong Kong?

I am enjoying myself immensely in this city! AMFI prepared us really well on the culture and how to behave in school and at work, which made the so-called “culture shock” easy. The city is mesmerizing and there is so much to see and do. I have been hiking in the mountains, visiting temples, tanning at the beach, going up in skyscrapers, experiencing nightlife and surrounding myself along thousands of (often slow walking) Hong Kongese people everyday. I had to get used to the massive amount of people around me all the time and the typical “Chinese smell” as we all call it here, which is hard to get used to. Walking along the food stands you will smell and see crazy things, like chicken feet and all kinds of (alive!) fishes you can choose to eat. Everyday I see crazy stuff, but I really love it, because it is such a different world here and I still can’t believe I get to experience it for myself. Overall, I found it quite easy to settle down in Hong Kong; transport is super easy and convenient, all signs are in English, most people also speak English and I never feel alone with all my AMFI peeps around me.

 

Crab

Plenty of alive seafood to choose from.

 

Why would you recommend people to do this specialisation?

Don’t do it because you want to learn the Chinese language; it is really, really difficult and hard to make progress in such a short amount of time. However, it is great to know the basics and be able to say some basic sentences to impress people. I think the Chinese lessons are great, because you get to learn from Chinese students who are around the same age as you, which makes the differences in culture very clear and super interesting. The most important part of this specialisation is yet to come though: working at a fashion company in Hong Kong or China and writing a research and advice report for them. I will be working at Perfect Moment, a luxury ski-, surf- and activewear brand, which has their production and sourcing office in Hong Kong. I will have four visits to factories in China and will be able to see the production process with my own eyes in the country where 80% of all clothing production takes place. It is a great opportunity if you would like to work in production, because China is a leading country in fashion production, and working here will teach you a lot about communicating and cooperating within such a different culture. When else will you get the luxury of someone (in this case AMFI, thanks Annet, Jan and Eva!) arranging a company in China for you where you will be able to gain work experience, do relevant research and make you see the inside of factories with your own eyes?! And all of this while exploring an amazing city together with 13 other AMFI students?! For me, the first month has already been a time of my life I will never forget.

 

If you want to know more, or have any questions; always feel free to contact me! – Sarah

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Is the Fashion Industry Really That Competitive? http://amfi.nl/fashion-industry-really-competitive/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 17:42:07 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19433   The fashion industry is known as an extremely competitive industry. It has grown tremendously over the years; around 1980 a rough amount of 34 million people were employed, today […]

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The fashion industry is known as an extremely competitive industry. It has grown tremendously over the years; around 1980 a rough amount of 34 million people were employed, today it has increased to approximately 80 million. The size of fashion crowd eager to work in the business has grown as well, as the amount of fashion schools popping up world wide. This as a result of fast-fashion making the term ‘fashion’ accessible for everyone, but also had the industry face serious trouble and changed the definition of what we used to perceive as competition. I spoke to three professionals  about their insights, experiences and the future of competitiveness.

 

Article by second year International Fashion & Branding student Zoë Akihary.

 

Special thanks to Annemieke van Beek (Co-creative partner Mart Visser), Leslie Holden (Head department of Design/MAFEC) and Jo Watson (Coordinator Denim minor and Brands & Identity)

 

Although fast fashion isn’t exactly the oldest term, it certainly has had the greatest impact, causing fashion to become the second most polluting industry of the world. We currently live in the content generation in which social media has increased everyone’s appetite for fashion and newness. One single ‘refresh’ button exposes us to an overload of new information and products. From the temptation of over-consuming, big retailers such as Zara now release new products every two weeks, by doing so, the retailer builds a certain hype and excitement surrounding ‘popular’ items that seem likely to disappear. Fashion is easily and quickly copied nowadays. This change of pace in production and competition has brought problems such as damage to the environment, loss of value, fashion waste and unethical behaviour.

 

These problems change how we see competition to work of solving these industry problems together. This generation is much more open about sharing, sourcing and working together, because there is an increasing amount of willingness of improvement. It’s a different culture in which we’re more keen to share and give information instead of being competitive individually. New methods, such as pre-competitive collaboration, are introduced. This basically means brands collaborating together to source out the right and sustainable materials in order to improve the sustainable era of the industry. Brands slowly realise they won’t be able to improve the pollutive industry on their own to make a real difference. There is no point in everybody developing their own individual materials when it’s harmful for the environment. We should invest in good, sustainable -production and materials and share those with each other strategically.

 

The key is to keep the consumer always in mind even as, the brand, brings their own values to the fore. We should continue to design clothes that epitomise great design and use high-quality materials, but now do think twice before ignoring issues of environmental responsibility and ethical production standards. Consumer’s expectations of fashion are changing and so must the industry’s. Adapting will be a challenge, a daunting and overwhelming one, but the brand that puts his or her values first, and the bottom line second, will stand out from the crowd.

 

So to conclude the fashion industry has now moved to a new era of competitiveness, one in which this generation is taking responsibility for the problems that had been caused recently, and is much more transparent. There is more industry, more job opportunities, but also a broader group being eager to take part in this industry and therefore improving it. Getting noticed and finding a job is the same challenge as back in the day, it will always depend on your own strengths, ambition and preferences. The fashion industry is just as competitive on the job market just like any other industry.

 

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What about the AMFI Master? http://amfi.nl/what-about-the-amfi-master/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 16:41:10 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19413 “It is motivating as hell, because you actually care about what you learn.”   Today, we have a chat with the twenty-year-old Constantin Whale, who’s born in Germany but lived […]

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“It is motivating as hell, because you actually care about what you learn.”

 

Today, we have a chat with the twenty-year-old Constantin Whale, who’s born in Germany but lived in Vancouver, Toronto, Switzerland and now Amsterdam. Together with his business partner, Kick van Doorn they created the creative platform Skandl. We talk about the master’s programme, about Skandl and he shares his tips & tricks for those who are  considering applying for the Master’s programme.
Article by third year Fashion & Branding student An-Sofie Vandecruys.

 

Constantin and a mate working @byAMFI

During an event which they organised at the byAMFI store.

 

So, Constantin, could you tell us something more about your background and why you chose for the AMFI Master programme?

I was studying sociology and I actually didn’t want to do anything with sociology. The only thing that kept it interesting for me was doing research. I was already working in fashion, for a contemporary menswear brand, and through that I connected with a lot of people within the industry. Entrepreneurship was something that I was always enthusiastic about and I knew that one day I wanted to have my own business, my own company. So, I started doing research on what I wanted to do next. Should I find a job or look for a study that offers something to me, in the direction of fashion and entrepreneurship? I somewhat stumbled upon the AMFI master’s programme. Surprisingly, it was kinda exactly what I was looking for. Because of my sociology background I didn’t want to do a theoretically masters with a lot of theory and research. Also, the fact that you have to start your own company was for me a very positive factor.  

Thus you applied and subsequently created Skandl. What is it and for whom?

Skandl is a creative platform, a service. It exists out of two sections. Firstly, there’s the commercial side, the digital agency. We provide digital strategy, which includes marketing, digital branding and contact strategy. We create a lot of media content, like lookbooks, videos, and photoshoots. Besides that, we do also content production and engagement marketing. That’s how Skandl generates revenue.

 

For example, we are now building a guide for small, sustainable brands to really communicate the values of sustainability, so they don’t have to use the common narrative of sustainability. We want these brands to communicate in a way that is cool and actually speaks to the people that don’t necessary care only about sustainability.

 

Secondly, which is a special thing we developed, is our creative network. This is where we try to find and support creators whether these are designers, producers, illustrators, graphic designers, photographers, etc. By giving them a platform and a commercial opportunity.

 

And what about the Master programme, what’s your experience?

It is a very multidisciplinary programme, because we are with a lot of people from different backgrounds who do different things. So they had to find a way to make all the information useful for all of us. The programme is divided between service and product. If your company is delivering a product than you follow classes in supply chain management. These are obviously not useful for me, so that is one distinction within the Master. It’s an interactive programme and the fact that we exist of a small group makes doing workshops easier and are also able to help each other. We think about scenarios with the teachers that we can apply to our company. It’s not boring at all, you actually want to go to class because you know you’re going to learn something useful. It is motivating as hell. And you care, you actually care about what you learn because everything you learn in class, you can apply to your own company.

 

In regards to the company, it has to be fashion and sustainable. You start with the Master thinking you have the idea that you want to execute, but it involves so much more. They encourage you to do a lot of research, which is nice because the idea I started with is nothing like what it is now, it is always changing, you know. But that keeps it interesting too.

 

It’s not only about you and your company, you have to help each other out and everyone you meet through these people. The Master acts like a safety net, they guide you, have a lot of expertise, a lot of connections. The teachers have maybe already failed for you which allows you to speed up things, because if I just moved here and I didn’t meet the people that I did whether it is through AMFI or the teacher network, I probably wouldn’t be where I am now and how my company has evolved.

 

You talk a lot about your company. It sounds like you get a lot of freedom within the programme, how’s that?

Of course, it is still a Master and you have to do certain assignments. Because it is an accredited programme, there are requirements. Sometimes you’re stuck in between. Like, do I focus on this now or put all my effort in my company and projects that you don’t get marks for? Sometimes you have to make a choice. It feels like you’re working two full time jobs but after awhile you get used to it.

 

And another thing I learned during the masters is a lot of entrepreneurs say don’t sleep, work like crazy, and don’t go socializing. But I don’t agree with that. If you’re in this kind of industry, like fashion, like music, you have to go out. That’s how you connect and meet people of the industry. It’s about finding the right balance and keeping things exciting.

 

The Master programme is fairly new. Was there room for feedback?

Yes, sure. Because we are the first years of the Master programme, it is still evolving and growing. We give feedback to the teachers so they can improve it for the next generations. We’ve already come up with some things than can be improved. The team of teachers is really proactive and changing things for the better, seeing what’s working and what’s not. I think that’s important to like to help them out.

 

And I wish we had class in the AMFI building as well, to connect also with the students from the Bachelor programme, as they may be maybe your target audience or you could network with the teachers. I would easier ask a teacher what they think because they’re all experts in the industry; it would be more useful for all of us I think.

 

And last but not least, would you encourage people to follow the Master programme?

Yes, if you want to start your own company, and if you have the drive to do your own thing, for sure. If you’re just doing it to get another degree, definitely not, just go get another degree instead. You should really care about the company that you’re starting and how this Master is going to be a tool to get there. I don’t think anyone in the program looks at it, like ‘oh I want to get a degree’. Everyone is very focussed on how this will help their businesses, and that is the main objective of the masters and it definitely should be.

 

Do you have tips or key advice for people who are thinking about starting their own business and applying for the programme?

I know this will sound cliché but pick something that you can see yourself doing everyday. You must want to think about everyday because you will end up thinking about it and working on it everyday. I am thinking about things related to my own company all day long. Also, don’t only think about it, but talk about it to other people as well. Don’t think of it as like this special idea that only you have and that someone would want to steal it, because that’s not the reality. The company is eventually going to become what it is, because of how you execute your idea. If someone else had your idea it would look totally different.

 

Don’t be scared to get feedback from people and share and talk about your idea. Also don’t be so set on that one idea, it’s just an idea and it will evolve and change. You should be open to change, and be flexible, especially within the Master programme because you’re going to get feedback all the time from people who really know what they’re talking about and work in the industry or have their own company. They will give you feedback and what you think will work, might not, so you’ll have to adapt it. Those are the main three things that are important, even if you would want to start your business without going through the programme, these are some things you should really consider.

 

For more information:

@skandl

http://createskandl.com/

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Why did he come back? http://amfi.nl/why-did-he-come-back/ Tue, 10 Apr 2018 10:45:51 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19373 For the sake of creativity, we decided to introduce you to a blog in a style that’s not only aesthetically pleasing, but also matches with the topic of the blog: […]

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For the sake of creativity, we decided to introduce you to a blog in a style that’s not only aesthetically pleasing, but also matches with the topic of the blog: Martin Margiela.

 

Text and visuals by Noémie Ninot, first year International Fashion & Branding.

 

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A recap of Fashion Week: reread the most talked about moments and shows http://amfi.nl/recap-fashion-week-reread-talked-moments-shows/ Tue, 13 Mar 2018 13:11:17 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19397 February’s fashion month is finally wrapped up with Nicolas Ghèsquieres spaceship collection for Louis Vuitton ending Paris Fashion Week last Tuesday. This article comes just in time to refresh the […]

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February’s fashion month is finally wrapped up with Nicolas Ghèsquieres spaceship collection for Louis Vuitton ending Paris Fashion Week last Tuesday. This article comes just in time to refresh the memory with what went down after a month filled with shows, shows and shows.

 

By third year Fashion & Branding student An-Sofie Vandecruys.

 

Set at Calvin Klein AW18

Set at Calvin Klein AW18.

 

Raf Simons for Calvin Klein surprised once again with his popcorn farmhouse set. Simons is known for making divergent statements with metaphorical references to the American movie scene. This time the catwalk floor was filled with popcorn as a suggestion that movies are the only thing that keeps the American coasts and mainland together. Or is it maybe, because we all eat popcorn and like to watch, observe and judge? Apart from the conceptual approach from Simons, his designs were a combination of different styles (check print, oversized coats, sleek snits) merged in a unanimous whole.

 

Calvin Klein AW18

Calvin Klein AW18.

 

One show that definitely stood out from the crowd was the one of Sies Marjan which revealed an intense play of shading colours going from bright pink to dark purple, alternated with some deep brown and green tones. Besides the mesmerizing colour palette, the designs were a mix of elegant long dresses, classic trench coats with a sturdy touch and long pants combined with long shirts.

 

Sies Marjan AW18

Sies Marjan AW18.

 

Bold, statement coats with eighties inspired influences as we’ve seen in the collections of both Calvin Klein and Marc Jacobs. Besides the oversized silhouettes remarkable were the the bold primary colours leaving a mark on the whole Marc Jacobs collection.

 

Marc Jacobs AW18

Marc Jacobs AW18.

 

Apart from the big designer houses, a lot of smaller fashion designers presented their winter. collections. Feminine, quite loose silhouettes and lots of layering was seen in the collections of Prabal Gurung, Nanushka, Rosie Assoulin and Maryam Nassir Zadeh.

 

Rosie Assoulin

Rosie Assoulin AW18.


Landing in rainy London, the LGBTQ+ inspired collection of Christopher Bailey for Burberry was remarkable. The whole collection was a trip down memory line bringing back trends and styles of Bailey’s time as creative director. This show was both a tribute to the LGBTQ+ movement and a goodbye from Bailey self, who wove some typical Burberry elements in the collection. Riccardo Tisci, former director of Givenchy, will follow up Bailey.

 

info@imaxtree.com

Burberry AW18.

 

Fun fact, the Queen of England, yes Her Majesty, made a surprise appearance on the front row at Richard Quinn’s AW18 show. She was there to present the designer with the first ever Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design.

 

Arriving in Milan where everyone was beyond excited for Alessandro Michèle fall show for Gucci. Expectations are high as BoF ranked Gucci as the second hottest brands of 2017, just landing under Balenciaga. The decor was an operation room with the well-known green blue floors and bright cold lights. The most random, and most Instagrammed look, were models carrying around a replica of their head. The collection nevertheless was good, but not one of Michèle’s bests. Gucci wasn’t the only one to bring animals to the catwalk. At the Tod’s show, models walked around with cute puppies.  

 

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Gucci AW18.

 

In Paris, Simon Porte Jacquemus announced that he will start with his own menswear line called L’Homme Jacquemus. This is definitely a collection that I will be forward to look upcoming June during the Men’s Fashion Week.

 

The set of Dior took three weeks to build in Musée Rodin. The collection was a throwback to the end of the sixties which are known for a lot of student protest in Paris. This angle was the inspiration of Chiuri who used the crochets, the embroideries and the patchworks and designed them through Dior’s luxury lens.

 

Mention worthy was the show of Loewe were Anderson brought 15 different coats to the catwalk. Balenciaga let women and men walk together on the runway for the first time. The whole production process was done through technology. The models’ bodies were 3-D scanned, the “fittings” happened in a computer file and then prototypes of the designs were printed out. Traditional fabrics were bonded into a lightweight foam. The result of this fabric melt was models walking in their identically shaped razor-sharp, sleek, basque-waisted jackets and coats.

 

Balenciaga AW18

Balenciaga AW18.

 

Balenciaga AW18.

Balenciaga AW18.

 

Rei Kawakubo, for Comme des Garçons, created a show from frills and fantasy which embodied her vision of Comme des Garçons Campas. Designs were a merger of crinolines, lace, and flowers.

 

Comme des Garçons AW18

Comme des Garçons AW18.

 

And that’s it, yet another month of fashion has passed by. But with all the interesting shows, points of view, and conceptual collections, the top of the fashion industry didn’t bring, in my opinion, important issues to light. Big, corporate industries didn’t address any of the sustainability issues that the fashion world faces today. We remain in a system where there are hundreds of new collections presented each six months, from clothing to shoes, to bags, to jewellery, and even to make-up. It’s a shame that we still cheer on a system that encourages us to buy new clothes every season while our closets are bulging out of stuff. It’s too bad that big fashion designers and magazines aren’t communicating, or using, new, more sustainable, producing techniques.

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The Ultimate Guide on How to Survive the AMFI Intake Days http://amfi.nl/ultimate-guide-survive-amfi-intake-days/ Tue, 27 Feb 2018 12:41:05 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19286 Curiosity meets excitement. When damp hands are bundled with hopeful faces, it’s time for the AMFI Intake Days. The moment that gives potential new students the chance to let them […]

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Curiosity meets excitement. When damp hands are bundled with hopeful faces, it’s time for the AMFI Intake Days. The moment that gives potential new students the chance to let them show their suitability for the Amsterdam Fashion Institute as well as the fashion world. In the following, we provide you with five tips and tricks on how to survive the AMFI Intake Days successfully.

 

Article by Katharina Gerken.

 

  1. DON’T PANIC

First and probably one of the most important rules to prepare yourself mentally: don’t panic. Being nervous on your Intake Day is totally normal, since you want to show the best version of yourself on this special day. AMFI isn’t aiming for a harsh intake procedure, it is all about finding out if you and AMFI would be a good match. The environment at AMFI is super helpful and open-minded, so don’t be afraid to ask for help.  And always keep in mind: you are not the only one. A lot of applicants managed to survive the Intake Days, so can you.

 

  1. START IN TIME WITH YOUR GIVEN ASSIGNMENT

All students at AMFI are extremely familiar with sleepless nights before a deadline. Therefore, we would like to prevent you from a stressful all-nighter. The given assignment might challenge you, but don’t forget: it is doable if you start early enough. Being creative sometimes takes time, therefore make sure to start right away to be satisfied with the outcome of your project. This attitude might save you within your AMFI career.

 

  1. WORK STRUCTURED

One thing our teachers love? Working with Process Books! A way to work perfectly structured is to divide your assignment in several phases such as research, decision-making and evaluation. Therefore, you work in a critical way and teachers can directly see your self-development as well as your way of self-reflecting, which is a main learning aim at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute.

 

  1. ENGLISH IS NOT THE BIGGEST OBSTACLE

As it is for the majority, English might not be your mother language. You might be afraid to make mistakes, but learning a language fluently is all learning-by-doing. Trust me, your English will improve with time and at the Intake Day, there is definitely room for mistakes. Overcome your fear and try to speak as loud and clear as you can, the rest will come with time.

 

  1. BE YOURSELF  

Last but not least, BE YOURSELF! Easy said, but staying true to yourself is a crucial element for your Intake Day. During your interview, in which you talk to AMFI teachers and students, try to be as honest and genuine as possible. On your Intake Day, AMFI wants to get to know you – not someone you’re trying to pretend to be. Trust in yourself and you will rock your Intake Day at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute.

 

In this spirit to all the applicants – enjoy your Intake and make it one of a kind.

 

(Big thanks to Cornel Doornebosch (Second Year Int. Fashion & Design), Sanne Lejeune (Second Year Int. Fashion & Management) and Luisa Temmen (Int. Fashion & Branding Applicant) for giving me a personal and inspiring insight of their Intake Day.)

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The AUAS has appointed Valérie Lamontagne as professor of Fashion http://amfi.nl/auas-appointed-valerie-lamontagne-professor-fashion/ Thu, 22 Feb 2018 08:54:15 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19271 The Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (AUAS) has appointed Canadian Dr. Valérie Lamontagne as professor of the Fashion Research and Technology research group at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute (AMFI). Lamontagne […]

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The Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (AUAS) has appointed Canadian Dr. Valérie Lamontagne as professor of the Fashion Research and Technology research group at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute (AMFI). Lamontagne will start her professorship, affiliated to the Faculty of Digital Media and Creative Industries, this month and will move to the Netherlands this year. The AUAS is looking forward to welcoming her.

 

As a wearables designer, curator and researcher, Lamontagne brings a lot of knowledge to the professorship, where various areas of expertise meet. Research and innovation, for example, take place in a multidisciplinary setting, from virtual and industrial design to human movement science and from philosophical to historical contexts. Lamontagne will be focussing on researching creative applications for the use of technologies in fashion, that span interests in new models of manufacturing and fabrication, intelligent textiles, to technologies for the future of retail and marketing.

 

Fashiontech technologies

In addition, Lamontagne will be engaged in making full use of leveraging emergent technologies to create new platforms for fashion that we wear in the everyday. “Specifically, I will be looking at fashiontech technologies that can be applied to the current material and social landscapes of fashion use, fabrication and aesthetic.”

 
A great deal of experience
Dr. Lamontagne brings a great deal of experience and international contacts to the AUAS. The designer holds a PhD in ‘Performative Wearables: Bodies, Fashion and Technology’ from Concordia University in Montreal (2017), where she was Adjunct Professor in Design and Computation Arts. Furthermore, Lamontagne is the owner and designer at 3lectromode, a wearables electronics atelier dedicated to avant-garde crafting and consulting in fashionable technologies. She is also the founder and director of the Fashiontech Festival in Montreal.
 
This is not Lamontagne’s first time in the Netherlands. She regularly travels all over the world to speak on the subject of fashion and technology at conferences and exhibitions, and has visited our country in the past. In this respect, she collaborated with the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen (2014) on the exhibition ‘The Future of Fashion is Now’, and has previously lived in Rotterdam (2011) for a PhD research stay at V2_Institute for the unstable media.
 
Link between research and education

 The AMFI is looking forward to collaborating with Lamontagne. “We are delighted that she will be joining us and we are looking forward to working with her, to connect research and education in an innovative and creative direction”, according to director Irene Sparreboom.
 

Photo by Dominique Lafond

Photo by Dominique Lafond

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Triptych 2018: “Always have an open mind.” http://amfi.nl/triptych-2018-always-open-mind/ Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:00:42 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19303 Three departments, 10 groups and three weeks. A few weeks ago the second year students of AMFI went on the rollercoaster called ‘Triptych”. Everyone approached the project in a different […]

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Three departments, 10 groups and three weeks. A few weeks ago the second year students of AMFI went on the rollercoaster called ‘Triptych”. Everyone approached the project in a different way, and had different experiences and learning moments. Reporter Zoë Akihary spoke to Wes, a second year Fashion & Branding student about his experience.

 

Article by Zoë Akihary.

 

Could you tell us a little bit about yourself and something you expected to learn from Triptych?

My name is Wes and I’m a Fashion & Branding student. Beforehand I heard a lot of experiences and stories about Triptych, but I approached the project with an open mind. We had a very nice group with clear communication, which was great. I wanted to have a leading role during the project, because I’m normally more on the background waiting for something to happen. I like doing my own thing. But by working in a big group, I learned that I’m able to be a good leader. That was something I hadn’t tried before, so it was interesting for me to see what is was like to turn my way of working around. By doing so I developed my communication, organisation and leading skills.

 

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Wes developing his photography and visualisation skills during Triptych. He’d love to do the minor Fashion & Visual Culture next year.

 

What was a surprising element in the process of the project?

I didn’t expect that the communication could be so clear within such a big group. Everyone respected each other and had an open mind towards their peers. Besides that, I found it very important that everyone did something they felt comfortable with, or had the chance to develop themselves in certain areas they wanted to. That’s eventually what this project is all about; to focus on other aspects of the fashion industry and have the freedom to develop yourself.

 

What was your role during Triptych?

What I have learned during Triptych is to listen to other people. I have developed my English skills by speaking to others a lot. It was also very interesting to see the development of a concept from someone else’s perspective, which was very inspiring.During the project I learned how important clear communication is, because everything has to be in one line, in order to come up with a consistent brand DNA. A tip: Always explain to the rest of your group what you are doing. Other than that, I was mostly responsible for the concept, brand book and visualisation.

 

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Group 2 ‘Catalyst’: a great dynamic between the branders, managers and designers.

 

All second year students explore the options for the flexibele programme in the third and fourth year. Were you able to use Triptych as a starting point for the upcoming two years?

First I didn’t really have a clue which direction I wanted to go in, in the flexible program, but during Triptych I have realised that I’m very interested in visual communication and conceptual photography. I find photography and film very interesting as well as communicating a certain message through visuals.

The feedback we got back from the teachers on our concept, was that, without explanation needed, it really stood out compared to the other concepts. This made me realise that our brand was indeed visualised very well, and that that is what I’m good at.

 

If you look back at the past three weeks. Was there something you would have done differently?

The communication between 25 people went quite well most of the time, but we took all decisions together. Next time it’d be better to choose three ‘decision-takers’ of each department, three students who are very involved so we can cut off the ends much quicker. Besides that, I’d give the tip to investigate the remaining two departments beforehand so you can be much more understanding and open-minded towards their contribution!

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Triptych 2018: “I didn’t expect to be sad that it’s over!” http://amfi.nl/triptych-2018-didnt-expect-sad/ Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:40:33 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19264 At the end of the third semester it’s time for annual project Triptych. This is an exciting moment for second year branders, designers and managers as they merge together and […]

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At the end of the third semester it’s time for annual project Triptych. This is an exciting moment for second year branders, designers and managers as they merge together and create a brand based on two icons within 2.5 weeks. Reporter Zoë spoke to Jitske from the “Catalyst” group. She is a manager who developed her creative writing and visual communication skills during the project.

 

Article by Zoë Akihary.

 

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Second year Fashion & Management student Jitske.

 

Could you tell us a little bit about yourself and something you expected to learn from Triptych?

My name is Jitske and I’m a second year Fashion & Management student. We have just finished Triptych and I didn’t expect to be so sad that it’s over! During the project my aim was to develop my visual communication skills. Our group had an overload of branders, so it was easy for me to get involved and help throughout the process. As a manager I’m not used to go very in-depth with the visualisation and internal branding part of a concept, so the branders kindly helped me with how to approach a visual by introducing me to the terms ‘denotation’ and ‘connotation’. I sat in on the brainstorm sessions of the branders, but sometimes it looked like they had such a different mindset when it came to research, concepts and visual communication. After a while I think it really did help me a lot to participate those sessions. I was prepared to go through a 3-week long hell, but after day one, I figured it’s actually very inspiring to work in such a big and mixed group.

 

What was for you a surprising element in the process of the project?

I didn’t expect the communication to be so clear. With almost 30 people in the group, with different opinions, I expected endless discussions all the time when we were about to make decisions. Gladly, this didn’t happen at all during Triptych. Everyone was open to the ideas of their teammates. We found a way to combine all these different thoughts into a lot of different ideas. Then, we merged all our best ideas together into a concept we all agreed on.

 

What was your role during Triptych?

To gain more broad experience in the fashion industry I focused more on branding within the project. I helped creating the future scenario, kept the process book up-to-date and helped writing the pitches. It was great to do something completely different from Management for a few weeks, because even after the Christmas break, I was not mentally prepared yet to work with numbers again.

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Behind the scenes of the installation of Jitske’s group ‘Catalyst’.

 

In the second year you’re exploring your options for the flexibel programme. Did Triptych help you to find out what direction you’d like to go to?

Definitely! Next year I hope to do the minor Fashion Theories in which you research fashion with a cultural approach. This means I have to write essays, so during Triptych I wrote a lot of texts which was good practice for the future.

 

If you look back at the past three weeks. Was there something you would have done differently?

Well, I think sometimes we were a bit too enthusiastic, which may sound a bit odd. We threw so many creative ideas on a pile, that eventually, we had to ditch quite some elements. For us, the concept was very clear, but it was harder to follow for an outsider. So to the people for next edition of Triptych, I’d say: keep asking people from outside of AMFI, or at least outside of your group, for feedback, as they are eventually the customers who have to understand the concept.

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An account of Triptych in analogue http://amfi.nl/account-triptych-analogue/ Wed, 14 Feb 2018 07:32:02 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19251 For reporter Emma Smit was Triptych 2018 a way to explore her passion for analogue photography, as she captured the entire a process on a disposable camera.   Images and […]

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For reporter Emma Smit was Triptych 2018 a way to explore her passion for analogue photography, as she captured the entire a process on a disposable camera.

 

Images and article by Emma Smit.

 

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After the concepting phase of Triptych, the branders sit together with the fashion managers and designers to carefully explain and discuss conceptual starting points. Open communication is very important when creating a consistent brand identity. After everyone is up to date and ready to get their hands dirty, the designers start sewing the garments. The stress is on.

 

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Here are some branders doing some intense research into the minds of Frida Kahlo and Miley Cyrus. Triptych 2018 was all about finding inspiration in the lives and work of two icons. Brand distinctiveness is requisite when attracting your audience. This is why analysing and deconstructing their motivations can be a very tedious, but interesting process.

 

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After finding some conceptual starting points for our brand, we started analysing the images. Moodboards are the necessary building blocks when it comes to visually communicating your ideas. Practice makes perfect. Here are some of the students from The Tv is Off deconstructing some conclusions and giving feedback on each other’s moodboards.

 

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Developing a logo is very exciting. Triptych teaches students how to work collaboratively, while still being friendly and looking at things with constructive criticism. Here we see some branders agreeing on a logo they came up with. Seeing hard work come to life puts a smile on everyone’s faces.

 

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Students from management, design and branding all come together to make Triptych a night to remember. We teach and help each other with the things we have learned over the last 2 years at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute. By bringing diverse opinions together we strengthen our collaboration skills which will qualify us for the real world.

 

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The designers spent all night and day working to get the outfits done. They know what hard work feels like. Whilst shooting the images to further enhance the brand identity, the designers get to see their garments come to life.

 

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Experimenting, sketching and discussing, is something students at AMFI know all too well. Here we see students discussing the final details before starting to sew the garments. Colours, extravagant patterns and using the correct fabrics can make or break a look.

 

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The students create a concept, design the garments, make them and then of course plan the photoshoot. Here we see some students deciding on hair and make-up that fits their visual identity. Elba van den Heuvel models for The Tv is Off brand photoshoot. Designers tend to her to make the outfits look magical. After Triptych, this garment will be recycled and guaranteed a second life.

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