Specialisations/Minors – AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Mon, 28 Oct 2019 15:58:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 32314050 Pitching a New Marketing Campaign to Converse http://amfi.nl/summer-mentorship-converse/ Mon, 05 Nov 2018 17:09:35 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19767 One thing we didn’t expect from this summer was to be invited by the Vice President of Marketing Converse Europe, for a week-long mentorship with the brand. And we would […]

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One thing we didn’t expect from this summer was to be invited by the Vice President of Marketing Converse Europe, for a week-long mentorship with the brand. And we would have never believed, at the start of the school semester, we would be sitting around the table with the Converse team, discussing the communication strategy for the next quarter. Not only that but we would be invited as special guests to pitch our very own ideas for the upcoming campaign.

By Roxanne van Zanden and Kathelijn Samuels 

4Outside of the Converse headquarters in London.

We might not have expected this dream opportunity but we both felt we were suitably prepared. At the start of our specialization, we deep-dived into the semester by entering the D&AD new blood awards. These awards give you the chance to show to the creative industries what you and/or your group are capable of. Big brands such as Adidas or organisations like the WWF share a brief with a real business challenge. Winning a yellow pencil award truly marks you out as one of the best. It can be the start of your future.

 

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Exploring the origin of the Chuck.

The D&AD awards were the perfect try-out for what came further down the road of our specialization, working with actual fashion brand industry briefs. The class was divided by brief and our own challenge was; “to help reconnect the teen female in London to the Chuck Taylor, using the key communication message all the stories are true” with a mobile-first campaign. After ten weeks of brainstorming, creative thinking, designing, and editing we were finally ready with a solution. All six groups working on the Converse brief visited the HQ in July to pitch to an illustrious panel of Converse Europe team members – the VP of Marketing Adrian Fenech, Brand Director Claudia Calori and Brand Design Lead Danicha Leliveld. It was an amazing opportunity to get some very valuable feedback from professionals in the actual working field.

 

Since our campaign idea was chosen as the best solution, the VP of Marketing invited us for a week mentorship in the holidays and to share our idea to the rest of the team. This purpose of this week was to learn how a creative idea would move forward from the pitch stage. We met with every member of the Marketing team including meetings with the Head of Culture and Entertainment – Rens van Mackelenbergh, who’s in charge of influencers. As well as other inspiring team members working in communications and retail to learn how the different functions work together in order to release a campaign in the market.

 

We had to pitch again, this time to the whole Converse brand/marketing team and it was just as nerve-wracking the second time around to convince the professionals of our idea. Afterwards, we had some personal one-to-one meetings with them and received feedback from different perspectives on our concept. Since we had made a 3-minute video we were able to show our research and thoughts in a short amount of time.  With every member being an expert in a different field, the feedback was diverse and on all the angles of what you actually need to think of while creating a real-life campaign for a brand.

 

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Insights into the pitch of the campaign idea.

After the meetings, we also got the chance to attend the monthly marketing “stand –up” meeting. It was very inspiring to see the VP of Marketing explaining all the stories and strategies behind the different campaigns and to learn how the brand plans all the communication stages throughout the quarter. What was really amazing to hear in this presentation was the fact that Converse and our own idea were so aligned. So, we might actually see some of our work come to life!

And, last but not least… We got seated by the Head of Culture and Entertainment – which means that we actually got treated as if we were some very important influencers ourselves, including access to the storage room to find us some clothes and our own Chucks!

 

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Joyful after digging into the depths of the exclusive Converse storage.

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Hong Kong Diaries #1: Sarah Slingsby http://amfi.nl/hong-kong-diaries-1-sarah-slingsby/ Mon, 07 May 2018 18:43:15 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19456 In our Hong Kong diaries we’ll meet three Fashion & Management students during their specialisation semester in Hong Kong & China. Here, they’ll write about their time spent abroad, share […]

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In our Hong Kong diaries we’ll meet three Fashion & Management students during their specialisation semester in Hong Kong & China. Here, they’ll write about their time spent abroad, share some tips and knowledge about the Hong Kong culture and the specialisation itself. This week International Fashion & Management student Sarah Slingsby (21 years old) talks about her first month in Hong Kong.

 

Article by third year Fashion & Branding student An-Sofie Vandecruys.

 

Why did you choose for the specialisation ‘International Production’?

When I applied for AMFI I already saw the possibility of going to China within the flexible program, and I immediately thought of this as a great opportunity. I find Chinese culture and its art very inspiring, and visiting this country would give me so much life experience. However, I wasn’t sure at that time what I wanted to specialize in later, so I just kept it in the very back of my mind. When I realised during the second year that I wanted to focus on production, I thought this specialisation would be a once in a lifetime chance and an opportunity I should grab with both hands.

 

Management students in Hong Kong

The management students in Hong Kong.

 

What did you do in the first phase of the specialisation?

The specialisation starts off with three weeks of preparation at AMFI, including a one-week WRAP course, presentations on both a Chinese topic and the company you are placed at, and Chinese Mandarin lessons. After this there is one week of transfer to Hong Kong. Here you will start off with four weeks of Chinese language & culture classes at PolyU before starting at your company.

 

How is studying at the PolyU?

The campus is beautiful – however a bit confusing in the beginning – and has great facilities. Our teachers at the PolyU are master students who want to become Chinese Mandarin teachers for foreigners. It is great that while you learn a lot from them, they also learn a lot from you. Both from an educational point of view, as well as personally and culturally. The classes are quite serious in China; you can not be late, eat in class or lack participation. However, the teachers are incredibly nice and love to talk to you about their favourite restaurants in Hong Kong, their hometowns and where to go shopping.

 

meeting local people

Meeting the locals.

 

What do you do in class?

The classes are mainly from 09:30 – 12:20 and always start with reviewing the previous class, then learning new grammar and words and end with a drill (which means speaking the words over and over again until we pronounce them right). Once a week we have culture classes on food, music, drama and fashion. We also visit a museum twice. There is no homework, except reviewing previous and following classes, so there is enough free time to explore the city. There are three tests in total, which do require some studying, but the teachers prepare you very well, so there is absolutely no need to stress about this.

 

What are the main differences between AMFI and the PolyU?

The biggest difference for me is how the Chinese handle time. 5 minutes before the start of class we would have to start Whatsapping our classmates where they are and you would need a good reason to be late or miss class. Also, the classes always end right on the exact minute. We would repeat words until class is officially over, never too early. I would say that AMFI is more relaxed, informal and chaotic. I feel like the PolyU is very well structured.

 

How is Hong Kong?

I am enjoying myself immensely in this city! AMFI prepared us really well on the culture and how to behave in school and at work, which made the so-called “culture shock” easy. The city is mesmerizing and there is so much to see and do. I have been hiking in the mountains, visiting temples, tanning at the beach, going up in skyscrapers, experiencing nightlife and surrounding myself along thousands of (often slow walking) Hong Kongese people everyday. I had to get used to the massive amount of people around me all the time and the typical “Chinese smell” as we all call it here, which is hard to get used to. Walking along the food stands you will smell and see crazy things, like chicken feet and all kinds of (alive!) fishes you can choose to eat. Everyday I see crazy stuff, but I really love it, because it is such a different world here and I still can’t believe I get to experience it for myself. Overall, I found it quite easy to settle down in Hong Kong; transport is super easy and convenient, all signs are in English, most people also speak English and I never feel alone with all my AMFI peeps around me.

 

Crab

Plenty of alive seafood to choose from.

 

Why would you recommend people to do this specialisation?

Don’t do it because you want to learn the Chinese language; it is really, really difficult and hard to make progress in such a short amount of time. However, it is great to know the basics and be able to say some basic sentences to impress people. I think the Chinese lessons are great, because you get to learn from Chinese students who are around the same age as you, which makes the differences in culture very clear and super interesting. The most important part of this specialisation is yet to come though: working at a fashion company in Hong Kong or China and writing a research and advice report for them. I will be working at Perfect Moment, a luxury ski-, surf- and activewear brand, which has their production and sourcing office in Hong Kong. I will have four visits to factories in China and will be able to see the production process with my own eyes in the country where 80% of all clothing production takes place. It is a great opportunity if you would like to work in production, because China is a leading country in fashion production, and working here will teach you a lot about communicating and cooperating within such a different culture. When else will you get the luxury of someone (in this case AMFI, thanks Annet, Jan and Eva!) arranging a company in China for you where you will be able to gain work experience, do relevant research and make you see the inside of factories with your own eyes?! And all of this while exploring an amazing city together with 13 other AMFI students?! For me, the first month has already been a time of my life I will never forget.

 

If you want to know more, or have any questions; always feel free to contact me! – Sarah

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Snap together for animals http://amfi.nl/snap-together-animals-2/ Wed, 08 Nov 2017 14:16:52 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=18926 Third year Fashion & Branding students Violette van den Berg and Aron Meier won the ‘New Blood’ Award at D&AD (Global Association for Creative Advertising & Design Awards) with a campaign for […]

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Third year Fashion & Branding students Violette van den Berg and Aron Meier won the ‘New Blood’ Award at D&AD (Global Association for Creative Advertising & Design Awards) with a campaign for the NGO brand and anti- fur organization – ‘Resepect for Animals’. Their campaign is feautred on the Trend Tablet website.

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Watch the promo video here:
 

 

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Snap Together for Animals http://amfi.nl/snap-together-animals/ Fri, 30 Jun 2017 07:26:26 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=18330 How do you make a generation with a 3-second attention span care about an issue far removed from their daily life? We met up with Violette van den Berg and […]

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How do you make a generation with a 3-second attention span care about an issue far removed from their daily life? We met up with Violette van den Berg and Aron Meier, 3rd year Branding students and winners of the 2017 ‘New Blood’ award at D&AD (Global Association for Creative Advertising & Design Awards) with a campaign for the NGO brand and anti- fur organization – ‘Resepect for Animals’.

 

Article by Tesa Pavic (2nd year Int. Fashion & Management) and Roy Doron (2nd year Int. Fashion & Branding).
Violette & Aron (Photography: Tesa Pavic)

Violette & Aron on the stairways we all know very well (Photography: Tesa Pavic).

This July AMFI is celebrating the students creative execution as the different pencil awards of 2017 will be handed to the winners. Just before the ceremony begins they share with us the story of their successful campaign.

Starting as a part of the Brands & Identity specialisation the campaign was developed under the coaching of Jo Watson, Casimir Morreau & Pepe Villaverde. They helped us create an idea which elevates our own work into something better. It was a great opportunity, Violette explains.

The aim of Aron and Violette was to change people minds by creating a contemporary campaign so they can think differently about fur. It’s really just about questioning the perception of people on a certain subject.” Aron points out: “We choose this brief (out of 16 options) as it was the most linked to fashion – meaning we could have a relevant perspective in comparison to other candidates. As fashion has a long history with fur, we thought it would be interesting for us to tap into that subject and explore why people wear fur.”

Since 1962 the D&AD Pencil has represented the very best in design and advertising

Since 1962 the D&AD Pencil has represented the very best in design and advertising

As most of the D&AD applicants come from advertising or communication schools, by choosing this brief they created a competitive advantage with their fashion culture and experience. “I think it really allowed us to think out of the box. Branding pushes you to develop a long story and think in a certain way. Advertising students think differently in a more disruptive way of creating ideas. They have to create a lot of them to have a really good one.”

Violette elaborates: “It is not visual, you do not put things together which look beautiful. You write 150 different posts-its and you stare at them for hours. You to talk many people and try to understand the psychology and motivation behind people’s actions. You try to understand the social media ecosystem, how people interact with each other, what motivates them.”

"Our opportunity lies in those who still make up their mind: the always-connected Generation Z"

“Our opportunity lies in those who still make up their mind: the always-connected Generation-Z.”

When asked about the aim of their campaign and the target audience, Aron explains that “the campaign is aiming to change the behavior of people by using online tactics. We understood that you can’t really change the mind of someone who has been wearing fur for a long time. For example, if they have been wearing fur for thirty years they must have a close relationship with fur because it is such a sentimental garment. So we thought whose mind can we change? The future generation – Generation-Z”.

The choice for Snapchat as their communication tool seemed obvious, as Violette explains: “Generation-Z’s favorite app is Snapchat so we looked at the platform and we discovered the filters. A lot of them have fur animals. Users put dogs, foxes and rabbits on their faces but they never think about the fact that these animals are killed for fur.”

"We remove digital representations of animals, like the Snapchat lenses, to show the young generation that real animals are in urgent need of their help."

“We remove digital representations of animals, like the Snapchat lenses, to show the young generation that real animals are in urgent need of their help.”

In today’s digital era, there are probably more people that interact with these animals through Snapchat, rather than in real life. Aron and Violette found the opportunity in the apps visual presentation to engage with their target audience. “With the time that we had I think we did the best that we could. Of course after a project you think we could have done things differently, like the storytelling of the video for example, but overall we are very proud of the final product.

"We disrupt their use of social media by creating a frustration" - 'Snap Together for Animals'

“We disrupt their use of social media by creating a frustration” – ‘Snap Together for Animals’

Yearly people from all over the world send in their submission(s),  following only 18 of them to recieve an award. With another AMFI group that won, Lara Wagner & Eleonora Kalabokas, AMFI is slowly but surely becoming a yearly must-watch competitor at the D&AD!

 

"We disrupt their use of social media by creating a frustration" - 'Snap Together for Animals'

“We disrupt their use of social media by creating a frustration” – ‘Snap Together for Animals’

 

To watch their really inspiring video, visit the campaign page on the D&AD website.

 

 

 

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iNDiViDUALS: balance between creativity and commercialism http://amfi.nl/individuals-balance-creativity-commercialism/ Tue, 07 Feb 2017 13:16:29 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17208 Last week iNDiViDUALS presented the new collection during a intriguing show. We spoke to three students to find out how the harmonious collection was created within 20 weeks. Article by […]

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Last week iNDiViDUALS presented the new collection during a intriguing show. We spoke to three students to find out how the harmonious collection was created within 20 weeks.

Article by Stephanie Barbian, 2nd Year International Fashion & Management. All photos by Team Peter Stigter.

 

iNDiViDUALS is a specialisation programme that fuses the three programmes offered by AMFI – Amsterdam Fashion Institute: Design, Management and Branding. Every season a new generation of students  develop the brand further. Each individual from each department is responsibly working according to a specific job role, constantly trying to respond to the Zeitgeist and aiming for a balance between creativity and commercialism.

Right before the show: making sure the models enter the catwalk in the right order.

Right before the show: making sure the models enter the catwalk in the right order.

Individuals Generation 22 presented its A/W 2017 Show on Wednesday January 25th at Loods 6. It was an impressing presentation of an inspirational collection showing a mixture of the 90’s grunge movement, the roaring 20’s era and the current Zeitgeist. Three Specialisation students Danique Grosjean (Fashion & Branding), Faralda Boerwinkel (Fashion & Design) and Mandy Muijs (Fashion & Management) shared their experience on working for iNDiViDUALS and especially of the making of Generation 22.

 

Starting with your concept idea: “3 am – what a time to be awake” what is behind it?

Mandy: “3 am – what a time to be awake. When it is 3 am and you find yourself in your bed asking yourself what the reason is for you to be awake, being annoyed and frustrated whilst at the same time you could be dancing in the club having the time of your life. There is a contradiction in your mind.”

 

What is the source of your inspiration and how did you implement it in the collection?

Faralda Boerwinkel: “The presented A/W 17 collection was inspired by the 90’s grunge movement and the roaring 20’s era. For us – both of these times matched in a way, in a way both of them were free and rebellious. Those feelings combined make the aesthetics of the collection. The 20’s dropped waistline and the iconic flannel shirt from the grunge movement are clear references we used. We clashed them with the current Zeitgeist.”

 

In what way does your influence/specialisation of department come back in the current collection?

Danique: “The branding team has the focus on the concept together with the design team and then develops it to the end. Next to that the branding team is generally concentrating on bringing the outcome to the outside world, to the public.”

 

Models in line: the Show is about to start

Models in line: the Show is about to start.

 

What are the responsibilities within the three departments?

Faralda: “For Design in general, we all have our main job role on which we focus the most, which might be a Fabric Manager, Trimmings Manager, Accessories Manager, Print Manager, Studio Manager and Collection Manager. You are the spokesperson of your own job.”

Mandy: “Within Management, everyone takes care of production. So, you will be responsible for two styles from the previous collection, as well as two styles from your own Generation’s collection. When design created the pattern, it is in your responsibility to develop it further. Next to that, each Manager also has their own job role, e.g. General Manager, Production Manager, Sales Manager, CSR Manager or Finance Manager.”

Danique: “In Branding the division is bigger, there is the corporate identity but also seasonal concept within your own Generation. Concerning the seasonal, we can be creative and free in making decisions. While the corporate identity always needs to fit the image, since the corporate identity makes the brand recognizable. When the process begins, the branding team stays as a group while each of us thinks and acts in their own job role until owning It completely after the concept phase.”

 

Managing behind the scenes

Managing behind the scenes

 

What was your biggest challenge while being a part of iNDiViDUALS’s Generation 22?

Mandy: “Communication was a challenge throughout working on Generation 22. Each individual thinks in a different way, especially when differentiating between the departments. Some things might appear logical to the Management students, which will result in a lack of communication, since the Design and Branding students might not know too much about it. It takes time to figure out how much knowledge each department has.”

Faralda: “You are aiming for doing everything as perfect as possible due to working for iNDiViDUALS, a real brand but at the same time you are still in the learning process what means that you cannot do everything perfect. That can be really frustrating.”

Danique: “I get what Faralda is saying, as for me the biggest challenge was being in between reality and school. You work in a real company, but you still have to realise that you are still at school as well.”

 

Generation 22 - job well done! Amfi Individuals A/W17/18 © Team Peter Stigter

Generation 22 – the fruits of a semester of hard work.

 

The work Mandy, Danique and Faralda and all other 22 other talented AMFI students resulted in a successful and exciting A/W 17 show. The concept called “3 am – what a time to be awake” was converted into an experience on the runway by moments of storytelling, flickering lights and lively tunes balanced with the presented collection. Generation 22’s achievement is truly inspirational for prospective Generations.  More info on programme, as well as on the current and previous collections you can find at www.individualsatamfi.nl

 

 

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3D Hypercraft: pioneers in Fashion Design http://amfi.nl/3d-hypercraft-pioneers-in-fashion-design/ Sun, 01 Mar 2015 22:45:57 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=14244 Fashion design is a type of sculpting. The fabric is sculpted into a garment. – After Frank Zappa (1940-1993) AMFI’s Lectra Awards is organised annually to recognise talent in fashion […]

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Fashion design is a type of sculpting.
The fabric is sculpted into a garment.
– After Frank Zappa (1940-1993)

AMFI’s Lectra Awards is organised annually to recognise talent in fashion design and product development as well as creative exploration of 3D virtual garment prototyping. AMFI is one Lectra’s many educational partners who are helping bridge the technological gap in the field of fashion design. 

3D Hypercraft goes beyond a physical fashion collection to explore virtual garment construction in relation to form, detailing and application. Students investigate groundbreaking pattern making techniques, and how they operate in relation to all of the other variables of a garment within a virtual environment. ‘The freedom to test hypotheses and assumptions has a significant effect on the creative process’, says lecturer Ineke Siersema, who has published research on this very phenomenon. The AMFI Lectra Awards are designed to recognise excellent work and facilitate discussion about design outcomes and experiments.

Virtual Fashion Design 3D Hypercraft Etienne Cootjansa

Personal collection ‘Being’ by Etienne Cootjans.

Fashion Managers completed a technical design collection with a focus on high performance fabrics on assignment from companies, while Fashion Designers created a personal design collection based on a muse or tribe. The twenty-week programme begins with developing paper and Modaris 2D pattern drawing, and interacting with a 3D avatar. Assignments require a physical and virtual study of pattern design, material, fabric drape, details, layering, prints and haberdashery. For example, a designer can test the effects of changing placement of a print, the gauge of a knit, or the width of a seam on the body in real time. Once their virtual pre-collections have been developed, students test properties of their chosen fabrics in the lab. They can then attempt to simulate some of these properties in terms of fit and motion in a virtual space.

Virtual Fashion Design 3D Hypercraft Sarissa Bong & Jildou Abma

Protective rainwear collection for the Ministry of Defense by Sarissa Bong and Jildou Abma.

‘Students who develop their collections with the use of virtually simulated garments have shown that they are able to significantly reduce the number of physical garments and enhance their designs’, says lecturer Sandra Kuipers in her latest research on the potential of 3D technologies.’The reduction of costs and lead times may be an important reason for the fashion industry to implement virtual garment simulation. It can be argued that overproduction and the environmental footprint may be a secondary reason to stress the need to include these new innovations and knowledge based solutions into the fashion cycle.’

Virtual Fashion Design 3D Hypercraft Saskia Fell

Personal Collection – “Trapped in my own mind” by Saskia Fell.

Our 2015 jury for the awards: Inge van Lierop, Senior Fashion Designer at Vlisco; Fashion & Design alumnus and Lichting nominee Lisi Herrebrugh; Isabelle Foucart, Marketing Manager at Lectra; chaired by AMFI’s Peter Leferink. The judges criteria were based on how successfully the available tools were utilised and the extent to which the project shows special ambition or expertise. Sarissa Bong and Jildou Abma won the prize for best technical design collection. Etienne Cootjans took home third, Saskia Fell the runner-up, and Sarah Mayer first prize for best personal design collection. After congratulating the winners, Head of Fashion & Design Leslie Holden remarked: “Your work is a pioneering example for the new generation of fashion industry professionals.”

Virtual Fashion Design 3D Hypercraft Sarah Mayer

“Third Planet From the Sun” – Sarah Mayer

Fashion & Design students also created short concept films representing the story behind their collections with content from their creative process. Those who attended their 3D Hypercraft show at Studio K know how remarkable many of these films were. Curious about the collections? Watch the 3D Hypercraft show, click through the 3D Hypercraft photo album or Lectra Awards photo album on Facebook.

Sarah Mayer 3D Hypercraft pattern and outfit

Sarah Mayer’s pattern and simulation.

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3D Hypercraft: Playing with reality http://amfi.nl/3d-hypercraft-playing-with-reality/ Mon, 10 Feb 2014 09:50:32 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=11877 ’It’s as if I was in a computer game. Once you know the rules, you can play for hours’, explains Design student Jennifer Droguett. This “game” is 3D virtual prototyping […]

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’It’s as if I was in a computer game. Once you know the rules, you can play for hours’, explains Design student Jennifer Droguett. This “game” is 3D virtual prototyping software developed by Lectra. Designing clothes with this technology can feel like playing a game with an avatar and is all part of the 3D Hypercraft programme at AMFI.

Some examples of Sebastian’s beautifully tailored menswear collection, Light Prospector.

Some examples of first prize winner Sebastian Pleus showing his beautifully tailored menswear collection, Light Prospector.

Last week AMFI organised the fifth Lectra Awards where nineteen students presented their work to a jury of industry professionals and Lectra representatives. The four pairs of Management students were briefed to design sportswear specifically for the bicycle brand Bio-racer. They chose their own target market and developed a concept around their individual brand. The results were shop-ready, exciting and innovative. At the start of the programme the twelve Design students were given a carte blanche within their collection concept. The only restriction was to create three outfits where prints and knits are developed. The advice being given to experiment and test the boundaries of designing in 3D simulation and they did just that.

Picture 1: From left, 1st prize for Management students Alicia de Groot and Isabelle Schuijt, 1st prize for Design student Sebastian Pleus, public prize for Lisi Herrebrugh, 2nd prize for Design student Denise van Gent and 3rd prize went to Mirona Meseure.

Picture 1: From left, Alicia de Groot and Isabelle Schuijt (1st prize Management), Sebastian Pleus (1st prize winner Design), Lisi Herrebrugh (public prize), Denise van Gent (2nd prize Design) and Mirona Meseure (third prize Design). Photo: Ineke Vijn

The sentiments towards the software were all in the same vein. Initially it was met with apprehension and after a quick learning period, the world of design as we know it bursts open. Design students Shanita de Vries and Marijn Rikken commented that the ability to change patterns and colours in the blink of an eye meant that suddenly one’s designs drastically changed, and sometimes for the better. Without the software, it would take a few physical samples in order to realise the final garment, whereas now only one sample is needed. Properties of materials can be changed within the software, as well as stitch types and other important details. This means that for every virtual garment, you are able to see what it would look like and how it will drape in reality, down to the very last detail. Critics argue that technology stifles creativity, while these students argue that it enhances and validates the creative process.

A step by step view of designing in Lectra to producing in reality. This is Alicia de Groot and Isabelle Schuijt’s work which won for clear research in fabric and finishings.

A step by step view of designing in Lectra to producing in reality. This is Alicia de Groot and Isabelle Schuijt’s work which won for clear research in fabric and finishings.

When asked if this software would replace the need to learn pattern making Lectra’s Marketing Manager Isabelle Foucart states that without that critical knowledge, the virtual garment could never look as good. And it all did look very good. Prizes were awarded to students who fully pushed the boundaries of the software. Sandra Kuijpers and Ineke Siersema, both teachers at AMFI, have developed the 3D Hypercraft programme over the years and stress the value of learning software like this for young graduates. Sandra: ‘For companies such as Adidas and Nike the virtualisation of their collections is already implemented. By reducing samples they reduce costs, that’s a fact.’ Ineke: ‘Fashion companies like Dior Homme and other fashion brands are following. They will all need the 21st century designers that graduate with these 3D skills in their portfolio.

Denise van Gent’s designs were creative and experimental and pushed the boundaries of the Lectra software.

Denise van Gent’s designs were creative and experimental and pushed the boundaries of the Lectra software.

Text by Jade Wilting, 2nd year International Fashion & Management student.

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