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Fashion photography: captured from a different angle

A group of third and fourth year AMFI students have just started with the Fashion & Visual Culture programme. Design student Jessy Homburg is the first to share her experience, explaining how creating an innovative and meaningful fashion visual can take you on an unpredictable journey.   

Jessy Homburg, fourth-year Design student. Credit:  Jessy Homburg

Jessy Homburg, fourth-year Design student. Credit: Jessy Homburg

 According to the NY Times, an average person sees up to 5,000 marketing images a day.  For the average AMFI student, this is nothing. From year one, AMFI students are encouraged to find, analyse and create both fashion and non-fashion images that inspire, shock or at the very least, attract curiosity. Jessy Homburg and her fellow Fashion & Visual Culture peers needed to summon their skills. For their first assignment they made the leap from receiver to creator, and were given five days in which to pull out all the stops.

Jessy: ‘I wanted to create an image with a story. Yet for me, the challenge came in creating an image that is both strong and clear in its message.’ Transitioning back into AMFI after an internship in NYC with Diane von Furstenberg, Jessy found it difficult but important to find inspiration from existing images and combine these with her own, in order to create images in new and unforeseen ways. ‘The teachers insisted that we had to pull out all the stops; no holds barred. The craziest creations can come from unwanted mistakes and the ugliest photos can be the most interesting.’

A behind the scenes glimpse into the making of the final image. Credit:  Jessy Homburg

A behind the scenes glimpse into the making of the final image. Credit: Jessy Homburg

Inspired by the concept of intertwining nature and technology, Jessy began by collecting the necessary items. Fresh portobellos, Barbies and needles, all the ‘essential’ ingredients for an innovative fashion image. ‘I wanted to make something different, but it all turned out too literal.’

Stuck and frustrated, Jessy needed to vent. Facetiming with a friend on her iPad, Jessy explained how she was in need of a model, when both she and her friend had the epiphany of using her onscreen camera.  Fast forward through choosing the appropriate background, colour scheme and obtaining the right distance, and snap, an innovative and meaningful image was born. 

Jessy’s final image depicting the blurred line between the natural being and artificial intelligence. Credit: Jessy Homburg

Jessy’s final image depicting the blurred line between the natural being and artificial intelligence. Credit: Jessy Homburg

What Jessy gets a kick out of most is that the realness of the mushroom in combination with the clearness of the screen makes everyone wonder how and if the photo was Photoshopped.  It was merely the unpredictable outcome of a very creative idea. 

Text: second-year International Fashion & Branding student Travis Rice.

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