AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Fri, 26 May 2017 14:11:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 SNCT schenkt gelden stichting aan AMFI http://amfi.nl/snct-schenkt-gelden-stichting-aan-amfi/ Wed, 24 May 2017 09:40:43 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17946 Het bestuur van de stichting SNCT (Stichting Nederlandse Confectie Technici) heeft besloten de stichting te liquideren en de gelden van de stichting aan AMFI te schenken. De schenking komt ten […]

The post SNCT schenkt gelden stichting aan AMFI appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Het bestuur van de stichting SNCT (Stichting Nederlandse Confectie Technici) heeft besloten de stichting te liquideren en de gelden van de stichting aan AMFI te schenken. De schenking komt ten goede van onze studenten die dit jaar de International Production minor Hong Kong goed hebben afgerond.

 

De kern van dit programma is dat de geselecteerde studenten gedurende een periode van 12 weken aan het werk gaan bij confectie-fabrieken en/of aanverwante bedrijven in Hong Kong/Kowloon en Shenzhen/Guangzhou. Doel is het op doen van ervaring met en kennis van kledingproductie en de daarmee samenhangende logistiek. Dit bevordert het behoud van en het terugbrengen naar Nederland van kennis op deze gebieden. Met het oog op hun toekomst is het voor de studenten ook van belang intensief kennis te maken met de Chinese cultuur en management stijl.

 

AMFI is ten behoeve van dit programma een samenwerkingsverband aangegaan met Hong Kong Polytechnic University. De geselecteerde studenten krijgen gedurende 3 weken in Nederland intensieve lesprogramma’s in productiemanagement, logistiek, planning en kwaliteitsbeheersing. Daarnaast bezoeken zij in Nederland modebedrijven die in China produceren, kopen en verkopen. Met begrip voor deze processen kunnen zij dan in China ervaren/onderzoeken hoe deze verbeterd en versterkt kunnen worden.

 

Het verblijf van de studenten in China begint met 4 weken studie aan de HK Polytechnic voor intensivering en verdieping van de kennis  van Mandarijn en de Chinese cultuur en managementstijl. Daarna volgt gedurende 12 weken een individuele  stageperiode bij internationale bedrijven in China.

Photo by Anouk Bosma

Photo by Anouk Bosma

 

The post SNCT schenkt gelden stichting aan AMFI appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Turning yourself into a brand http://amfi.nl/turning-yourself-into-a-brand/ Fri, 19 May 2017 15:20:41 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17890 In the fourth semester of the Branding programme the students go on a more psychological route. Through the Brand Me project the students learn a lot  about themselves and about […]

The post Turning yourself into a brand appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

In the fourth semester of the Branding programme the students go on a more psychological route. Through the Brand Me project the students learn a lot  about themselves and about their classmates. AMFI.nl spoke with second year students Isabel de Kievit and Lindsey van Welzen about an intense semester.

Interview by Flora van den Berg (first year Int. Fashion & Branding). Photos by Isabel and Lindsey.

 

How was the switch from the third to the fourth semester?
“The Triptych project that was in between both semesters was rather heavy as we were working in big groups of more than 20 students, so it was nice to work on a somewhat less stressful assignment.” Lindsey tells us. “I thought it was  interesting to work on a more personal project. I really enjoyed working on something new that would be the start of something that continues for the rest of the school year”, Isabel adds.

Isabel (l) and Lindsey (r) with their brand concept.

Isabel de Kievit (l) and Lindsey van Welzen (r) during the second presentation of the Brand Me project.

What stands out to you about the fourth semester?
“It is a lot more specialised. It seemed to have more depth than the other semesters so far” says Lindsey. “We had to truly look at ourselves, but we have also learned how to create a brand out of someone’s characteristics. And, we elaborated a lot more on our brands than we did before.”

Isabel agrees: “It has become a lot more ‘real’ in a way. Mainly because there is an additional communication strategy, an online campaign and sponsored magazine. It feels very realistic.”

What assignments does the fourth semester consist of?
“It’s all about brand driven design and brand personality. The brand is the foundation”, explains Isabel. “The first product we had create were the Brand Me-boards, on which you needed to present your personal life path. During different classes  we discussed our stronger and weaker points. When something drastic had happened to you in the past it had to be on the board. We needed to have 3 or 4 basic values on the board and everything had to be connected to these values. But,we couldn’t design or style the board.”

A spread from the process book.

A spread from the process book.

“Yes, those psychology classes were intense”, says Lindsey. “The teacher would ask the most difficult questions, some of which you may not wanted to answer.”

“After that we had to create the Brand DNA-board. Those boards were swapped and you were linked to someone you may not have known very well. That person had to translate the personal story & DNA that was on the boards into a brand. It was quite a fun challenge, honestly”, says Isabel cheerfully.

What happens after that?

“Right now we are working on a brand- and communication strategy”, explains Lindsey. “The concept we were working on earlier needs to be translated into a fashion concept: How are you going to launch your brand? Where do you want to be? What is your position in the market? ”

“Following this we have to create a campaign magazine and an online branding campaign. We will be working on the concept in groups of four. Two people of the group will attend the Magazine classes, and the other two will attend the Online Campaign classes”, Isabel tells us. “In the end we have to deliver a process book, three A3 boards and a digital presentation for the campaign group, and one A3 board and the magazine, for the magazine group.”

Brand concept by Isabel and Lindsey

Brand concept by Isabel and Lindsey

This is the last semester before the flexibel programme starts, in which your can choose your own path. Are the next two years a lot on your mind?

“I think most of us think about it quite a lot”, says Isabel honestly. “We need to do a lot of research into what we would want to do after we graduate. At the moment I am working on my portfolio and a format of my presentation.”

“We have to orientate on the companies where we would like to do our internships, and where we would want to do our minors. The people who have already passed the assessment are already a bit further along in the process, I am still figuring out what I do want to do”, Lindsey adds.

“I have already arranged for my minor, but I am still working on finding the right internship,” Isabel explains to us. “I just want my portfolio, resume and cover letter to be in the same style. It is hard thoughto divide your time between the AMFI assignments and the internship interviews. Finding the balance can be difficult at times.”

And a great tip from Lindsey: “I think that just sending a letter isn’t enough, your application needs to be original. I think it’s smart to adjust your resume and cover letter to the brand you’re applying to.”

Another spread of Lindsey and Isabel's process book.

Another spread of Lindsey and Isabel’s process book.

What was your favourite part of the fourth semester so far, and what was your least favourite part?
“The hardest part for me was to really open up in front of the class. I have been through quite some things in the past and it was difficult for me to tell them, as our class isn’t very close”, Lindsey tells us.

“I think my favourite part is that we get to work together now”, Isabel adds. “I have to work with a completely different style for this project, so I am really getting out of my comfort zone, I love that.”

The post Turning yourself into a brand appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
“Innovation is key” – the top end view http://amfi.nl/innovation-key-top-end-view/ Sun, 07 May 2017 08:48:39 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17819 We took a moment to sit down with Souraya Bouwmans- Sarraf, former dean of AMFI, and Irene Sparreboom who has recently assumed the position. Souraya finished her AMFI career with […]

The post “Innovation is key” – the top end view appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

We took a moment to sit down with Souraya Bouwmans- Sarraf, former dean of AMFI, and Irene Sparreboom who has recently assumed the position. Souraya finished her AMFI career with the IFFTI conference which took place in March. We asked both women to reflect on how they see AMFI and the fashion industry in general.

 

Interview by Blanca Heise and Sarah Friedman, 2nd year International Fashion & Branding. Illustration: Olga Andegaweńska.

 

Could you explain how you experienced your first day at AMFI?                                      

Souraya: “For me it was quite new since I did not have any experience in the educational field. From the concierge handing me the master key to the lovely bouquet on my new desk, I experienced a truly warm welcome when entering the school.”

Irene: “Having worked at the HvA, my experience was different but familiar. It was almost an average Monday morning except for the fact that I spend a full day meeting my new colleagues.”

Artist impression of Irene (left) and Souraya (r) by Olga Andegaweńska.

Artist impression by Olga Andegaweńska  of Irene Sparreboom (l) and Souraya Bouwmans-Sarraf (r).

Souraya, previously you worked at Randstad. What makes managing a fashion school different than managing an employment agency?

The educational dynamics. Randstad evaluates four times a year whilst for AMFI every graduate is actually an evaluation. Their four-year journey measures our skills to prepare our students for the fashion industry. Moreover, I learned to apply a different approach when managing my staff since teachers are more critical and stubborn. An action in the educational field starts with a discussion on how to tackle a situation.”

Irene, you have covered multiple positions within HvA as a teacher, educational expert and head of MIC/CO. How does AMFI fit into this career path?

“I had some time to look around for new possibilities since I felt the need to broaden my horizon. I enjoy working with creative and innovative people, I decided to accept the challenge when Souraya called me. Besides that, the fashion industry itself is new to me. It excites me to combine my knowledge with new initiatives.”

 

“We constantly have to be ahead

to stay relevant”

Souraya, do you have any tips regarding fashion education?

Innovation is key. We constantly have to be ahead of the current fashion and educational developments to stay relevant in such a fast pace industry. All staff is expected to take initiatives and to be up-to-date in these fields. This is something in which we already have been succeeding. AMFI embraces innovation and the future.”

The Dandy inspired collection by Merle Kolman at the shoot (left) and in Lectra (right).

Digital design from the study programme ‘Hypercraft’, illustrating how technological innovations were added to the AMFI curriculum over the last years (collection by Merle Kolman).

Souraya, during the first interview you spoke about your goal to make AMFI one of the best fashion schools in the world. How do view that ambition now?

We definitely succeeded in this. By deciding on what we were not going to do and by making crucial choices, we designed a more focused curriculum based on our reality school concept, technology and sustainability. This has helped us to show who we are and what we do and this made us noticeable in the industry.”

Irene: I agree and therefore I want to continue these ambitions. Keeping focus is of great importance. Times are changing. Having less people and less money available makes it a challenge to uphold our reputation and to improve it but it is possible.”

 

“The unique curriculum of AMFI

should be appreciated”

Irene, AMFI is part of HvA, how does this influence your ambitions?

AMFI is unique in comparison to the other HvA institutions. Fashion itself is differentiating. AMFI is great in her branding and implementing the reality school concept. Likewise, our specializations and minors are one of a kind, such as Individuals. These aspects make our school stand out in the industry. HvA should remain appreciative to this unique curriculum.”

AMFI just hosted IFFTI, the annual conference of leading fashion schools worldwide. How do you see the future of fashion and its education?

Irene: “The future is about working together. AMFI houses the entire fashion industry in their three departments and therefore we especially should embrace working together and sharing our knowledge.”

Souraya: “Sustainability will be core. The past couple of years’ passionate teachers have dedicated themselves to this. The educational system should be woken up. Students should be made aware that they can influence the future of tomorrow. Also creativity is of importance. We need to understand how we can feed and maximize our students’ creativity. Additionally, the teachers will have an even more coaching role and are favored on their expertise rather than being just a teacher. Our experts offer different perspectives on the industry. Working together with technology, sustainability and creativity will help us move forward.”

The importance of sustainability was highlighted during the last IFFTI conference, in which a third of the programme was dedicated to the topic.

The importance of sustainability was highlighted during the last IFFTI conference, in which a third of the programme was dedicated to this topic.

What influence will this future vision have on AMFI itself and its students?

Souraya: “To emphasize the importance of working together, I believe it could be interesting to have a general first year. Giving students the opportunity to choose their department at the end of the year. Also, being communicative is definitely a must for the professional of the future. AMFI has integrated this important skill in all three departments.”

Irene: “During their AMFI career student learn to self-reflect. AMFI helps them in the process to understand what they want, what their skills are and how they can achieve their personal goals.”

Now something different, but not less important for a fashion school. Has being the dean of AMFI influenced your way of dressing?

Souraya: “Well, I entered the school in suit since this was common at Randstad. Soon I realised that I need some new work attire without stepping away from my personal style. Clearly, there is an AMFI all-black uniform going on. Even my daughter noticed that the amount of black clothing I owned was growing.”

Irene: “It made me wonder if the dresses I had always worn before were AMFI-proof. Now I am more aware of what I wear since I have an exemplary role in this school, but I never loose sight of who I am.”

 

“The people make AMFI special.

This community is exceptional”

What makes AMFI special?

Souraya: “No doubt, the people! Living in this digital age everything can be copied except the people. The ambitious AMFI community, which is proud and always goes the extra mile is exceptional.”

Irene: “Definitely the people! It is an honor to work with the AMFI crowd.”

Souraya, what are you going to miss most about the school?

There is one thing that I will miss most; the daily struggle of our students dragging their suitcases up and down the stairs. Besides that, it is fulfilling to see our students develop and graduate after four years. They leave with confidence and ready to captivate the fashion industry.”

 

You can read the first interview with Souraya here, more on the Hypercraft programme here and more on the latest IFFTI conference here.

The post “Innovation is key” – the top end view appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
They hacked denim http://amfi.nl/they-hacked-denim/ Thu, 04 May 2017 14:51:37 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17795 AMFI students Eleonora Kalabokas and Renske Koster took part in the 48-hour event Denim Premiere Vision Hackathon. Their skills gained from the denim minor, as well as their ability to […]

The post They hacked denim appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

AMFI students Eleonora Kalabokas and Renske Koster took part in the 48-hour event Denim Premiere Vision Hackathon. Their skills gained from the denim minor, as well as their ability to work under time-pressure were tested. They left with new friendships, bigger networks and inspirational findings into what will shape the future of denim.

Interview by Emma Wendt, student Int. Fashion & Branding.

 

What was the  goal of the Hackathon?

Renske & Eleonora: “The end goal was to design a concept that answered the question: ‘what is the future of Denim.’ It could consist of anything that focused on current problems within the industry. We were 25 students and worked in groups of 5. We got the opportunity to work with people within different disciplines and nationalities, including fashion marketers, designers and developers. This contributed to the experience being highly stimulating.”

Eleonora concept developing with her group, showing how important teamwork was throughout the process.

Eleonora concept developing with her group, showing how important teamwork was throughout the process.

You were part of the Denim minor at AMFI. Did that help you during the marathon?

Renske & Eleonora: “We were a lot more specialized than the other university students. It was quite evident that we were more knowledgeable on the subject of denim fabrics, details and finishings, and how the industry operates. With this, the others in our groups trusted us.”

What was the most memorable thing you brought back to Amsterdam?

Renske: “It was inspiring to see the broad range of innovative ideas created, all very much valuable for the future and the industry. Also to see how people from different cultures and backgrounds came together united and worked as a team.”

Eleonora: “I came to the Hackathon with no expectations, but was pleasantly surprised to see everyone’s unified appetite for change. It was like a little cohesive community. Everyone dressed the same and enjoyed small talk on shared obsessive interests on topics such as denim washings.”

What in your opinion are the most intriguing happenings within denim, its trends and innovations?

Renske: “I found it interesting to see how much of it was focused on the integration of fashion with technology. The winning team’s concept included an app where one could change the fit and size of jeans. Furthermore, the product itself was also interchangeable. One company that also focuses on technology is French based brand Spinali, who created a technological device. It vibrates on the jeans indicating the wearer if they should go left or right.”

Eleonora: “I find it very cool that other fabrics, such as corduroy, are being experimented with in the same way as denim, giving it the equivalent look and feel. Denim is also being produced at higher qualities making it suitable for formal wear. Alternative fabric manipulation tools are being used, such as lasers. This creates the desired faded lines without the jeans losing their authentic look. There is no doubt that denim is becoming more of a fashion product rather than just work wear. ”

Eleonora’s notes whilst she was brainstorming with her group.

Eleonora’s notes whilst she was brainstorming with her group.

Has your perspective of the denim industry changed after doing the hackathon?

Renske & Eleonora: “No, it has remained the same. The denim minor has done a great job at giving us the realistic picture of the industry. There were some ideas we had not heard of before, but overall we came to the event understanding the complexity of the denim world, it is almost like a washing machine.”

What do you expect for the future of the denim fashion sector?

Renske & Eleonora: “It is very much a growing fashion sector with 5 billion jeans produced yearly. Like sneakers, denim is normal and a greater necessity. It is however facing some challenges, including its environmental impact and sizing. The next few years will be focused on finding solutions to these problems, helping the industry to expand. Already, brands are looking at fit and how to produce for a wider body type platform. Shape memory is no longer only used with higher end jean brands such as Levis but also now Zara. The future will be focused on low to middle market brands that are becoming more popular in denim with consumers. Also, ingredient branding will expand, like Denham for example, promoting transparency within companies.”

Did you come into the hackathon with any main objectives and were they achieved?

Renske & Eleonora: “Our main objective was to show our faces and to have a greater role in the already small world of denim. It is so important to be engaged, meeting the professionals especially to have a chance at being a part of the world in the near future. This was definitely achieved, we made many new contacts, both friends and industry professionals.”

Taken on the first day of the Premiere Vision event, Renske is contentedly socializing with fellow students and fashion professionals.

Taken on the first day of the Premiere Vision event, Renske is contentedly socializing with fellow students and fashion professionals.

What was the biggest challenge you faced throughout the hackathon?

Renske: “We worked intensively 24 hours straight, hence staying awake was a struggle. It was also sometimes hard working in a multinational setting. Three in my group were from France, including my coach. They had a difficult time speaking English, which caused tension in the communication. This added negatively to the already stressful situation of the pressure of coming up with a good idea in a short period of time.”

Eleonora: “The panel wanted the concept to be semi feasible but also out of the box. I was constantly questioning myself. Could this product really sell? They pushed us to ask questions such as these, which motivated me to reach for a higher level. There was a lot of compromising which took a little time to get used to. After a while everyone wanted to have his or her own space which one had to respect. It was an intense experience.”

How will this hackathon benefit your future in the denim industry?

Renske & Eleonora: “The contacts gained will help expand our network for future job potentials. We were also the first ones to participate in such a denim hackathon. This makes for an interesting story. It also will show on our CV’s that we are open to thinking innovatively and creatively.”

What role does the young generation have in shaping the future of denim?

Renske: “The millennials, us, we are going to make a difference. Our generation is so open to change and innovation. We also value sustainability so much more. It is common sense to add sustainability when talking about anything within the fashion sector. Even though it was mandatory, everyone reflexively added sustainability to their Premiere Vision concepts. This shows how evidently the subject is ingrained into our brains.”

Eleonora: “We have a very different mindset than the older generation who work the way they always have done and think of sustainability as perhaps an extra burden for high profit. For us, sustainability does not necessarily stand for something resulting in the compromising of money. It is an added value that can be worked with, also cost efficiently.”

AMFI student Femke Jonkmans was part of the team that won the Denim Premiere Vision Hackathon – congrats to her!

A sample from Maritas denim showcased at the Paris Premiere Vision event.

A sample from Maritas denim showcased at the Paris Premiere Vision event.

All photos form  Premiere Vision Denim Facebook Page except for the photo of notes (Eleonora Kalabokas).

The post They hacked denim appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
byAMFI: for students, by students http://amfi.nl/byamfi-students-students/ Tue, 02 May 2017 07:44:48 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17806 byAMFI is changing! Lead by a new intern, Denise Admiraal, our Statement Store at Spui is transforming into a self-participating, dynamic platform for all AMFI students. We interviewed Denise about […]

The post byAMFI: for students, by students appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

byAMFI is changing! Lead by a new intern, Denise Admiraal, our Statement Store at Spui is transforming into a self-participating, dynamic platform for all AMFI students. We interviewed Denise about this exciting project.

Interview: Roanne de Kluizenaar, 2nd year Fashion & Management. Images:  Roanne de Kluizenaar & byAMFI.

 

Denise, what would your perfect byAMFI be like?

“A truly creative spot for all the amazing creative people at AMFI. Not only the happenings within the space are dynamic but the room as well. We can watch inspiring movies/documentaries there, share thoughts at a big table, give lectures, set up exhibitions, do yoga to release the school stress or whatever you want to do! The possibilities are endless. We have the space here and we should use it wisely, profitable for every AMFI student and use it as an extension of the AMFI building.”

Denise Admiraal started enthusiasticly as new byAMFI intern.

Denise Admiraal started enthusiasticly as new byAMFI intern.

Tell me something about yourself, how did you become the new byAMFI intern?

“I’m a 3rd year Fashion & Branding student. Last semester I did the specialization Brands & Innovation. After that I started an internship, but soon discovered that I value social connections and being active in the field more than sitting behind a computer from  9 to 5. In the past I often took on a leading role in projects in and outside of school and during my specialization I realized that I would like to deal with all kinds of people, managing a project and set things in motion. Coincidentally I was approached by Xandra Manuputty, asking me if I was interested in helping to give other meanings to the byAMFI Statement Store. So I became the new intern of byAMFI, transforming the byAMFI platform is my internship project. I was immediately enthusiastic; I feel that I can develop my personal learning goals in this exciting yet challenging project.”

All AMFI students can pitch their ideas for byAMFI this week!

All AMFI students can pitch their ideas for byAMFI this week, Tue-Thurs from 10am to 6pm.

What are the plans for the transformation of  byAMFI?

“I visualize a dynamic meeting spot for all AMFI students. What you currently see at AMFI is that many students are rather individualistic. Everybody is busy doing their own projects. Of course there are some partnerships during a semester, but in the end everybody stays on their own island. I hope to create a place where students from all years and all departments can come together and see how much knowledge we all share together. And realize what we can create with that knowledge! This byAMFI platform should become a project for students and by students. It must have an atmosphere where it is cozy, fun and yet a place where we can really learn something.”

The byAMFI store offers a big space to work together and gather creative minds. Come by and check it out!

The byAMFI store offers a big space to work together and gather creative minds. Come by and check it out!

Why do you think AMFI students need such a place?

“We are part of the HvA, but we are a little bit different than the rest. First of all: our school is all about fashion. It is hard to get accepted into AMFI, it is a highly recommended school and we all work very hard. I feel AMFI students need a place where we can gather our creative minds outside the walls of AMFI. A place with chill vibes where you can work on your projects and connect with fellow students at the same time.”

How will this platform influence the future fashion students?

“It will offer experiences in practice. A possibility could be to invite fashion professionals to the platform, offering changes as well. What we will do here does not necessary has to be about fashion. It can be so much more, there are so many other factors that influence fashion and fields that are connected to it. Think of the influence of the digital world, trends in food, spiritual movements, politics. This platform is not about the perfect AMFI picture – as far as there is such a thing. It is about giving room to the amazing creative minds of our students. Giving them a place where they can share and learn from each other, becoming even better future fashion professionals with more knowledge.”

 

You have ideas for the new byAMFI platform? Come to the Pitch Days this week! Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10am to 6pm.

 

In case you cannot pitch your ideas this week: leave them in the box on the AMFI stairs.

In case you cannot pitch your ideas this week: leave them in the box on the AMFI stairs.

 

The post byAMFI: for students, by students appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
A journey through time in order to move forward http://amfi.nl/journey-time-order-move-forward/ Wed, 26 Apr 2017 15:39:14 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17756 The graduation project of Design student Thijs van der Laan will result into six outfits inspired by the famous painting The Ship’ by Salvatore Dali. In this interview Thijs looks […]

The post A journey through time in order to move forward appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

The graduation project of Design student Thijs van der Laan will result into six outfits inspired by the famous painting The Ship’ by Salvatore Dali. In this interview Thijs looks back at his years at AMFI, talks about his graduation project and some first ideas of his future.

 

Article and photos by Stephanie Barbian, student Int. Fashion & Management.

 

Do you remember the time you got into AMFI? What expectations did you have?

“I was quite young when I started AMFI, I was 17 and I just got out of high school. The only thing I knew was that I wanted to do something creative. So I ended up looking into art schools and realised that I really liked fashion. I applied at AMFI without sewing skills and without portfolio, and I still got in. The lack of skills and experience turned my first year at the school into quite a chaotic time.  I doubted if I could even do it, but after the first year after my skills had improved and my time at AMFI went quite well. To be honest,  I actually did not know what to expect at the start. I only knew that I liked fashion, the image and the world around it. For me it is an art form.”

"For me fashion is a form of art."

“A vision is also about gettting to know your skills.”

Did your vision on fashion change over the years?

“Definitely. I was selected for the honours program, in which I started to develop some kind of direction. In the program I learned what I can do and how I can achieve that, and what I did turned out to be what I like. A vision for me varies from what you enjoy and what you can do. So for me the case is that I am quite good at making patterns. That is why I would like to go into direction of construction. So a vision is also about getting to know your skills.”

Do you have a fashion role model?

“Rei Kawakubo from Comme Des Garçons and Rick Owens are definitely my fashion role models. Both designers are completely doing their  own thing and they are pushing the boundaries of fashion. Next to that, they are still designing with a purpose. Their designs are not only art pieces. Their garments are not necessarily created to make people more beautiful. They are ahead of time.”

Tell me about your graduation project.

“The concept is quite broad. The idea is to have a journey through time;  what was crazy in the past and is normal now. It is about us never reaching the ‘ultimate normal’ since there will always be people acting differently and changing the boundaries of being normal. In that way, we always keep on moving forward, there is always a response. The world is chaotic right now, so I believe that it is important to re-create humanity and to bond. So in a way it is about moving through time on one hand, and on the other hand about people coming together. It will result in 6 outfits and matching 2D works.”

Inspiration for Thijs' collection from his Process Book.

Inspiration for Thijs’ collection from his Process Book.

What was your starting point? How did you come up with your project?

“I got inspired by this painting called ‘The Ship’ by Salvatore Dali. The painting shows a human being carrying sales from a ship on its back while walking out of the sea. My idea of the journey of time arose from the painting and the fact how Dali uses the metaphor of a person being a ship which sails through time.

Where do you want to be in a couple of years?

“My future is quite open. I would like to work in a company working with patterns, but never losing the part of being creative since that is really important for me. I want to gain more experience and I my demands are not too high yet. Another option is working for a commercial company and at the same time establish something private next to that where I can embrace my creativity. The last option would be the ultimate thing for me personally.”

Are you prepared for the industry? How do you feel?

The education at AMFI is focused on the industry. On one side, I believe that through the education I am prepared, but on the other side – there are so many things you cannot learn at school. The design program at AMFI is focused on the students developing their personal style, whereas in a commercial company the design process is proceeded in a different way. But during my internship time at Yang Li in London I learned a lot, I worked full time and was always with the designer.

Another peek into Thijs/ Process Book, revealing the line up.

Another peek into Thijs’  Process Book, revealing the line up.

What do you dread mostly in the coming months?

“I am very restricted in time, which means that I have to make decisions and stick to them. I am a bit afraid of ending up not being completely satisfied, regretting the decisions I made. Everything goes really fast, which also makes it quite realistic and comparable to the industry. Right now, I am trying to trust my instincts.”

 

This is interview is part of a series on AMFI students who are currently graduating. See the previous interview here.

The post A journey through time in order to move forward appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
A brand as a safe place for young queers http://amfi.nl/brand-safe-place-young-queers/ Wed, 19 Apr 2017 05:48:10 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17706 Graduation. For some students the most nerve wracking part of their study – for others a party. We follow three graduates in this semester. Branding graduate Travis Rice is creating […]

The post A brand as a safe place for young queers appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Graduation. For some students the most nerve wracking part of their study – for others a party. We follow three graduates in this semester. Branding graduate Travis Rice is creating his own brand: “My graduation project needed to be something that screamed me 110%.”

 

Interview by Blanca Heise, 2nd year Int. Fashion & Branding. Photos by Blanca & Travis.

 

Do you remember when you got in to AMFI?

“A little. It feels ages ago. Yet, I was helping with the intakes this Spring, which got me reflecting on my own intake day. I remember being very naive and I had a superficial idea about fashion and even more about branding. I don’t feel that I really thought of fashion beyond the garments and I can say with certainty that I was not aware of the breadth and depth of the industry.”

Travis on the Amstel campus courtyard: “Amfi taught me how to stick to my guns.”

Travis on the Amstel campus courtyard: “Amfi taught me how to stick to my guns.”

Did your vision on fashion change over the years at AMFI?

“I’ve learned that I actually knew more than I thought. I just needed the vocabulary and the tools to realize this. Throughout my years at the institute, I feel I have obtained a third eye and ear, allowing me to gain new and different views upon the whole world, not only on fashion. A view which has made me critical, yet honest and a little unhinged at times. However, if AMFI has taught me anything it is to stick to your guns. Additionally I would say AMFI has taught me to constantly find the connection between things and constantly ask why. Specifically on branding, I realize how immense branding can be and what influence it has on people’s lives. Especially today, brands have more influence than corporations and governments.”

What motivated your graduation topic?

“For my graduation project I did not want to create a project that gives me enough credits to pass. For me, it needed to be something that I am passionate about, proud of, and screamed me 110%. I also know that the projects I do best in, are the ones that are the closest to my heart. Projects containing my own twist and personality. Taking my strengths that I have built through AMFI and making them shine, in order to create something meaningful, that could even perhaps be launched into reality.”

Travis’ working station at home, dedicated to his graduation project.

Travis’ working station at home, dedicated to his graduation project.

What is the starting point for your project?

“I will create my own brand concept based on the idea of genderqueerness. I got inspired by my own experiences being gay and how growing up in a small town in the USA and now living in Amsterdam, has altered my perspective on a lot of conventions. Mainly, to completely throw conventions out the window or at the very least question them. Unfortunately the gay community is not always a united one and I want to create a platform which brings a change to this, amongst many other things. What is important in this concept is that being queer is a mentality and not a sexuality. And that many desire to be different, but queers dare to be different.

My project is specifically targeting the youth to make an accessible and affordable high-street brand. A fashion brand for young queers that has the potential to be the safe place many don’t have. Trust me, I know. Thus I want my brand to give queer youth the courage to stand-up, be shameless, as they freely create an identity for themselves that is reflective of who they are.”

Currently, the solution for genderless clothing is to go gender-neutral, however, the target group/Gender-Expansive (depends on which image you pick), show the direction Travis wants to go.

Currently, the solution for genderless clothing is to go gender-neutral, however this image (Gender-Expansive) shows the direction Travis wants to go.

What is your future goal?

“Working as a teacher in my previous career has made me aware of the change you make, which I sometimes miss in the fashion industry. The spotlights seem to always go to designers, models or the hottest new item. This is a small fraction of what truly goes on, and in my eyes, the least important. I either hope to work for a brand that is seeking to make social, political, and/or environmental change. If I cannot find one that suits me, I’ll launch my own. It is time we as members of the industry #getourshittogether and find ways to better the world and not just take from it.”

 

You can read & see more about Travis on his website!

The post A brand as a safe place for young queers appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Stay tight for a new magazine http://amfi.nl/stay-tight-new-magazine/ Tue, 18 Apr 2017 05:53:08 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17682 Last Thursday students of the minor Fashion & Editorial Branding presented four options for new editions of Garment. The 2014 AMFI magazine may be re-launched at the end of June. […]

The post Stay tight for a new magazine appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Last Thursday students of the minor Fashion & Editorial Branding presented four options for new editions of Garment. The 2014 AMFI magazine may be re-launched at the end of June. This year’s theme: Tights!

Text and image by Hannah Purner, 1st year Int. Fashion & Branding.

 

Tights seem to be a  garment that is rather uneventful as a theme for a magazine, but it turned out to lead to pretty amazing outcomes. Last Thursday each of the four teams in the minor created a stand to present their work, transforming a normal art classroom into a showcase of different views on magazines and the nylon fashion piece.

Stretching the ways you can read a magazine - Elisa van Barneveld, Maartje Weekers, Loïs Groenstege, Sven Ponthofer & Channa Cohn.

Stretching the ways you can read a magazine – Elisa van Barneveld, Maartje Weekers, Loïs Groenstege, Sven Ponthofer & Channa Cohn.

“Our magazine is inspired by the raw, unpolished and experimental side of fashion. The content on tights is not only covered by the actual garment, but we also focus on the tightness that we experience in fashion. Restrictions and boundaries, which we want to push a little further”, Sven Ponthofer explained. How to handle and read that magazine was not clear to me at first, so I had to find out about this unusual choice of style. “The original thought was to encourage the reader to make the magazine more personal. They always present their content in a specific order, but ours you allows you to change it the way you like. It also gives you the possibility to just take one article with you, so you don’t have to carry the whole heavy piece. The articles are related as they all deal with tights or tightness in fashion, but they can be read separately as well.”

Femme van Gils, Millie Harris, Fanny Alavoine, Melodie Balan, Rachel Douglass, Lola Vogels

The poetic tights explorers – Melodie Balan, Fanny Alavoine,  Millie Harris, Femme van Gils, Lola Vogels & Rachel Douglass.

“We all value garments a lot more when there is a story behind it, so we went on looking more into the story of tights and the individual that wears them. We used analog photography, because it is quite an intimate form of photography, which goes with our theme”. Getting those unique images was definitely an adventure for itself. “Most of the people we found on Instagram, one girl we randomly spotted at the university campus. We didn’t want models, we wanted real characters. One time, we had a shoot and the person didn’t show up, so I just went across the street to look for people and found this gorgeous girl. She just came with us, we snapped her pictures and now she’s in the magazine. Making the magazine was not always that easy, but in the end everything came together”.

Alexandra Mann, Carli Bureynejad, Eefje Kouwenberg, Elizabeth Thomas, Amber van Bussel, Maud Vos

In fishnets we trust – Carli Bureynejad, Amber van Brussel, Maud Vos, Elizabeth Thomas, Eefje Kouwenberg & Alexandra Mann.

“Our topic is to change the perspective on tights, how they’re perceived and how they are worn. The tone of voice of our magazine was all about being loud, bizarre and unpredictable, so we wanted every page to be a surprise.” When asked about time management and working process, Alexandra Mann answered: “Through the whole project we had designated jobs, but it blended together aswe needed to help each other out as well. Definitely lots and lots of teamwork in the process. We were given nine weeks, which are split up. Basically the first five weeks are all about developing the brand, the concept for the magazine and we had to argue why ours is worth printing. The other weeks we have to develop the product; all the writing, the photo shoots and the graphic design. So it was at a pretty fast pace.”

Isabel Dingle, Julia van Veen, Pim Spoor, Emily Stevenson, Iman Chin, Naomi ter Woord

Let tights tickle your imagination – Iman Chin, Pim Spoor, Isabel Dingle, Emily Stevenson, Julia van der Veen & Naomi ter Woord:

“We created an escape to let your alter ego run wild. Therefore we used tights as the object that makes your inner quirkiness come out”. How this is done, can be seen by three main chapters that talk about the distortion of tights. “We have interviewed lots of interesting people, like a guy that uses leggings and tights to transform himself into a different character every day. Our magazine is playful, daring and mischievous and we expressed that in graphic design and colors that are a bit weird, bright and bold. The acceptance of being weird was a big topic for us. In our chapters we talk about how tights can be used in different ways and that they are not for your legs only. So basically, fashion as a performance, dramatic and playful”, Isabel Dingle explains.

 

After visiting this exhibit of four inspiring issues of Garment, one will definitely find himself with a new look onto tights. Never would I have thought that there were that many facets to this particular piece of clothing. Many students agreed that the theme was a good choice. Tights as a garment are quite unusual, but a bit overlooked. So it makes sense to and to put the spotlight on it. Next job for the students is to come up with a publishing brief: in the months to come we’ll find out how and if they can publish their magazine and in what format – stay tuned!

 

Read more about the 2014 version of Garment here

 

 

The post Stay tight for a new magazine appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Honours Design: Making talent shine http://amfi.nl/honours-design-making-talent-shine/ Tue, 11 Apr 2017 12:39:45 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17672 Last week the annual selection of the AMFI Honours Program took place and the names are soon to be published. To find out according on what criteria the students will […]

The post Honours Design: Making talent shine appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Last week the annual selection of the AMFI Honours Program took place and the names are soon to be published. To find out according on what criteria the students will be selected, Peter Leferink gave short introduction into the program and its importance.

 

Interview by  Stephanie Barbian, 2nd year International Fashion & Management.

 

Why is it important to have the Honours Program?

“The essence of the program is based on one hand that we simply do have a number of highly talented and excellent students and on the other hand that there is a huge demand for excellence in the professional fashion world. We are surrounded by critical thinkers, by people with different visions, by people who are willing to take an extra step. It is my personal belief that a lot of educational programs have a mediocre outcome; kids being trained to fit in, so the program is an opportunity for selected students to get extra attention and guidance in order to make their talent really shine.”

What is the idea of the program and what is the outcome?

The idea is to motivate the students to make us of their creative freedom to the full extend. AMFI is encouraging and motivating the students with the help of the coaches to get to the end product of this program, the mini collection. The mini collection consists of three outfits established from their own vision and showing their own handwriting.”

"Guiding students who have a story to tell, is very special."

“Guiding students who have a story to tell, is a special thing for me to do.” Photo by Milan Gino.

What criteria do you follow to select the students?

“We work according to the AMFI competences, which include research skills, decision-making, actualisation skills, presentation skills, organisation skills and lastly evaluation skills. The outcome of these skills per student always play an important role. Next to that we pay attention to the products they have created over the study time at AMFI and also things they do outside AMFI.

The teachers’ opinions also play a role in the selection, even though it is quite hard to consult them about their experience with the students, since experiences are personal and always differentiate.

At the end, it is also about the personal institution; if I start talking to students at the very beginning, I sort of already know if they could fit the program.”

What do students get out of it?

“The most interesting thing each student gets out of this, is probably self-confidence. It is very important especially for creative people to establish confidence since most of them are highly insecure and at the same time highly perfectionistic. They are always afraid to fail and to make mistakes. Apart from this, students who took part in the program mostly have an easier time in the following semesters and are willing to put an extra effort in their work, what also increases their chances of better career opportunities. The Honours Program students are capable to be more critical about what they do, the quality of their work and value the power of collaboration.”

What is your experience of the program?

“Personally guiding people who heartily believe that they have a story to tell, is a special thing for me to do. The students differentiate so much and we if we chose a student who is not doing too well, it is especially intense to get the student to the point in which they start acting and creating. So according to our selection, it can be very hard, but also meaningful and inspiring to help the students to get the best out of the program, it is a very fulfilling feeling for me to guide the students and see how they develop.”

 

 Interviews with some of the selected students will be online soon!

The post Honours Design: Making talent shine appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Berlin is never Berlin http://amfi.nl/berlin-never-berlin/ Mon, 10 Apr 2017 09:11:34 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17648 “Paris is always Paris and Berlin never is Berlin.” Opening with a quote migt be a bit corny,  but with this one I simply could not resist as it is […]

The post Berlin is never Berlin appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

“Paris is always Paris and Berlin never is Berlin.” Opening with a quote migt be a bit corny,  but with this one I simply could not resist as it is just too true to not bring it in. Everybody that has been to Berlin before will instantly understand. Everybody who hasn’t, will understand after reading about the first-year Branders’ trip to the capital of Holland’s neighbour Germany.

 

Words by Hannah Purner.

 

Berlin is always sung about from the treetops and as creative Branders we for sure needed to find out what all the fuzz was about.  Firsty we had to shake off any prejudice about Germany and its inhabitants – No humour? The love of following rules? White socks in sandals? Clearly anybody that believes in these stereotypes has never been to Berlin; these are Berliners! Even their mayor himself proclaimed the now famous Berlin anthem “Berlin: Poor. But sexy” This call rang out loud and clear: Berlin is constantly changing, in resistance to the very notion of anything normal or conformist. It is creative, liberal, individual and runs with the ‘anything goes’ mind-set that simply does not give a hoot if you are gay, straight, student, punk, professional or a freak. Berlin is one giant sea of eclectic, swirling, shaking, skint neighbourhoods surrounding one dull, bombed-out-and-rebuilt-in-commie-concrete centre.

 

Of course its history is impressive, but this city has so much more to offer. One day we  walked 13 kilometres just looking for the Berlin Wall. Despite tired feet nobody complained, because there was simply no time to do so. There were so many little alleys, crazy street art hotspots and abandoned places to be explored!

So, no humour? Just take a closer look at some graffiti and street art and laugh your butt off about some hilarious, but also rebellious pieces. Following rules? If you just look at the activist youth of this city you will e realize that Berlin is everything but a follower of rules. Our guide  told us that in one neighbourhood inhabitants actually set the new Subway Sandwiches store on fire twice because they simply did not want it in their territory. And once and for all, white socks in sandals? This may describe the typical sixty year old German tourist on holiday, Berliners definitely take a flying leap around this one. They amaze with crazy styles such as headphones as belts or like one described herself: “the tranny from the block”.

 

As Paris is always Paris, but Berlin never is Berlin. This visual report  only gives so much of an impression of this always changing city, but are sure worth showing. After just a few days in this city we became fan forever.

This place full of popping graffiti and street art is called ‘The Dead Chicken Alley’. It had its birth during the time period of the Mauerfall. The desire for freedom and breaking the rules led to numerous cultural movements such as a group of young people calling themselves ‘The Dead Chickens’. They bought this alley to be able to freely express ideas and messages. Photo by Marie Van Puyenbroeck.

This place full of popping graffiti and street art is called ‘The Dead Chicken Alley’. It had its birth during the time period of the Mauerfall. The desire for freedom and breaking the rules led to numerous cultural movements such as a group of young people calling themselves ‘The Dead Chickens’. They bought this alley to be able to freely express ideas and messages. Photo by Marie Van Puyenbroeck.

 

With more and more of their cafes and restaurants coming into existence, Backstube Schiller proves to be successful with their four principles: self-made, regional, fresh and ‘long live diversity!’ They truly live up to their name giver poet Friedrich Schiller’s saying “Only the cheerful, only the peaceful soul, bears the perfect”. Photo by Hannah Purner.

With more and more of their cafes and restaurants coming into existence, Backstube Schiller proves to be successful with their four principles: self-made, regional, fresh and ‘long live diversity!’ They truly live up to their name giver poet Friedrich Schiller’s saying “Only the cheerful, only the peaceful soul, bears the perfect”. Photo by Hannah Purner.

Right before these fashion students went even more crazy: Voo Store in Kreuzberg. It is an exploration of modern design, visual culture and the future of luxury retail combined with an in-house café. The store has its focus on a selection that becomes a possession for life and serves more the longevity within design as opposed to short-lived trends. Photo by Yasmine Hilhorst.

Right before these fashion students went instantly crazy: Voo Store in Kreuzberg. It is an exploration of modern design, visual culture and the future of luxury retail combined with an in-house café. The store has its focus on a selection that becomes a possession for life and serves more the longevity within design as opposed to short-lived trends. Photo by Yasmine Hilhorst.

Art can be very interactive, as shown in this shot of a camera and a TV. Most of us kept referring to it simply as “surveillance”, but there was more to it. Taken in the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum. Photo by Leonie Miller-Aichholz.

Art can be very interactive, as shown in this shot of a camera and a TV. Most of us kept referring to it simply as “surveillance”, but there was more to it. And yes, this was indeed taken in the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum, after a visit to Voo Store – the happiness lasted. Photo by Leonie Miller-Aichholz.

What do a light bulb, a lemon and a happy AMFI student have in common? They shine in brightly! A creative Brander always keeps a watchful eye for the beauty in the everyday life. Photo by Lucas Yiu Ka Yam.

What do a light bulb, a lemon and a happy AMFI student have in common? They shine in brightly! A creative Brander always keeps a watchful eye for the beauty in the everyday life. Photo by Yiu Ka Yam.

 

 

 

These high-rise bunkers in the Humboldthain Park still exist as they could not be blown up after the war to not ruin the train racks next to it. Today they are visited by joggers that give themselves a challenge by running up the hill or by creative heads to take pictures. Photo by Lukas Schwering.

These high-rise bunkers in the Humboldthain Park still exist as they could not be blown up after the war to not ruin the train racks next to it. Today they are visited by joggers that give themselves a challenge by running up the hill or by creative heads to take pictures. Photo by Lukas Schwering.

If you are a vegan, Berlin is the perfect city for you. For once everybody that tries to eat no-animal products will be one happy little human, because the offer has no end. And enjoying a smoothie and a lovely piece of vegan cake on a rooftop terrace does not sound too shabby either. Photo by Hannah Purner.

If you are a vegan, Berlin is the perfect city for you. For once everybody that tries to eat no-animal products will be one happy little human, because the offer has no end. And enjoying a smoothie and a lovely piece of vegan cake on a rooftop terrace does not sound too shabby either. Photo by Hannah Purner.

Gloomy weather never stopped anybody from having a little photoshooting – even if the studio/hostel room had very small dimensions. Photo by Lisa Licht.

Gloomy weather never stopped anybody from having a little photoshooting – even if the studio/hostel room had very small dimensions. Photo by Lisa Licht.

What is Berlin without a walk along the longest remaining section of the Berlin Wall, The East Side Gallery. Many of the artworks by international artists on this concrete canvas are regularly updated by civilians, as the exclamation against Trump shows. Photo by Hannah Purner.

What is Berlin without a walk along the longest remaining section of the Berlin Wall, The East Side Gallery. Many of the artworks by international artists on this concrete canvas are regularly updated by civilians, as the exclamation against Trump shows. Photo by Hannah Purner.

This shop redefines the term of ‘vintage shopping’. For most students some high end vintage is almost impossible to acquire, but the store ‘Good Things Will Happen Soon”’ makes quality vintage and jewelry available for an affordable price – every small-budget-fashion-lover’s dream. Photo by Lisa Licht.

This shop redefines the term of ‘vintage shopping’. For most students some high end vintage is almost impossible to acquire, but the store ‘Good Things Will Happen Soon”’ makes quality vintage and jewelry available for an affordable price – every small-budget-fashion-lover’s dream. Photo by Lisa Licht.

A typical activity for a regular Amfi student in her natural habitat. Photo by Anouchka Gauthier.

A typical activity for a regular Amfi student in her natural habitat. Photo by Anouchka Gauthier.

“The values of a brand are reflected in everything they do” is what Branders are told almost every day. This little restaurant definitely is a good example for that. ‘Klub Kitchen’ shows their love for fresh, homemade and healthy food in their interior as well; customers refer to it as a clean, earthly-coloured “find-yourself-spa” with a bunch of greenery. Photo by Lisa Licht.

“The values of a brand are reflected in everything they do” is what Branders are told almost every day. This little restaurant definitely is a good example for that. ‘Klub Kitchen’ shows their love for fresh, homemade and healthy food in their interior as well; customers refer to it as a clean, earthly-coloured “find-yourself-spa” with a bunch of greenery. Photo by Lisa Licht.

Of course we also had to check out Berlin’s famous Techno scene. Having no personal experience with this genre whatsoever, walking into ‘Tresor’ was like entering a whole new world, almost like being on another planet. An experience not to be forgotten. Photo by Hildward Werleman.

Of course we also had to check out Berlin’s famous Techno scene. Having no personal experience with this genre whatsoever, walking into ‘Tresor’ was like entering a whole new world, almost like being on another planet. An experience not to be forgotten. Photo by Hildward Werleman.

The RAW Area is an alternative cultural place that shows that everything commercial is not welcome here. It is grey and colourful at the same time, due to bedraggled buildings decorated with exciting street art. Being in this area, whose future is uncertain these days, feels like strolling around on an unknown planet. Photo by Hannah Purner.

The RAW Area is an alternative cultural place that shows that everything commercial is not welcome here. It is grey and colourful at the same time, due to bedraggled buildings decorated with exciting street art. Being in this area, whose future is uncertain these days, feels like strolling around on an unknown planet. Photo by Hannah Purner.

There is not much more to say about this image but this: Doesn’t it totally give you the Berlin vibe? Photo by Lukas Schwering.

There is not much more to say about this image but this: Doesn’t it totally give you the Berlin vibe? Photo by Lukas Schwering.

 

Spotted: A typical Amfi student in her natural habitat. Photo by Anouchka Gauthier.

What would an Amfi student in Berlin be without taking an enormous amount of fashionable pictures that could almost go into a magazine. What can you say, we would definitely fit into the Berlin lifestyle. Photo by Anouchka Gauthier.

All cultural and creative aspects aside, this trip had one major experience that was very important: As cheesy as it may sound, it gave us the opportunity to grow closer together. Photo by Anouchka Gauthier.

All cultural and creative aspects aside, this trip had one major experience that was very important: As cheesy as it may sound, it gave us the opportunity to grow closer together. Photo by Anouchka Gauthier.

Translated into English this sign saying „Wish for everything“ was spotted on the rooftop terrace of the Shopping Centre “Bikini Berlin”. In combination with more sayings in other languages as well, these signs sent out the positive and encouraging vibe Berlin is known for. Photo by Hannah Purner.

Translated into English this sign saying „Wish for everything“ was spotted on the rooftop terrace of the Shopping Centre “Bikini Berlin”. In combination with more sayings in other languages as well, these signs sent out the positive and encouraging vibe Berlin is known for. Photo by Hannah Purner.

The post Berlin is never Berlin appeared first on AMFI.

]]>