AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Tue, 24 Jan 2017 09:58:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Triptiek – 250 Students, 10 Brands, 0 Waste http://amfi.nl/triptiek-250-students-10-brands-0-waste/ Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:55:20 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17078 Walking through the AMFI halls you can feel that something special is happening this week. The annual Triptiek event will take place at Het Sieraad next Tuesday. Until then 250 […]

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Walking through the AMFI halls you can feel that something special is happening this week. The annual Triptiek event will take place at Het Sieraad next Tuesday. Until then 250 second year students are working full power in  mixed groups to create their fashion brands. We had a look behind the scenes and spoke to the team that is organizing the event.

Article written by Roy Doron and Marjolijn Oostermijer, second year International Fashion & Branding students.
Preparations for the photoshoot of the poster.

Preparations for the photoshoot of the poster.

Triptiek2017 will host 10 brands based on contemporary concept design and a sustainable zero waste vision. Each brand synthesizes historical and modern icons through a fashion concept.

 

This year’s Triptych theme is based on a clash of classical masters with contemporary dark romanticism. The concept and the visual identity of the whole event (?)is developed by another group of students, in charge of the event concept and planning. This team consists of 5 management and 5 branding second year students. The team is also working daily on finding sponsors and collaborations with different local companies for different aspects of the event including music, food and drinks, hair and makeup, photography, printing, floor planning and the event decoration.

 

Dark orange is the primary colour of this year’s Triptiek. Sarah Friedman (L) and Femke Castermans (R).

Dark orange is the primary colour of this year’s Triptiek. Sarah Friedman (L) and Femke Castermans (R).

The event team is working on providing the groups the full set up in the space to present their brands. The 3-piece-collection of each brand will be presented in a fashion show, with a garden as a centre piece, which will be surrounded by the runway. Around this garden, the groups will present their brands in a brand stand and a 3D installation.
 

The event management team developing this year’s concept.

The event management team developing this year’s concept.

Brandi LaCertosa, a Branding student who is part the event management team: “The 10 of us have come together from different departments; both the Dutch and International courses. We pull from our range of experiences and styles, and evaluated our personal strengths to determine where each could contribute the most. It is really a team effort, where every person is essential to create an amazing event. It is mind-blowing what 250 students can pull of in only three weeks – I can promise you the event is going to be extraordinary!”
 

Brandi LeCertosa from the event management team.

Brandi LeCertosa from the event management team.

 

Make sure to get your tickets for the event through http://www.triptiek2017.com/.

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]]> Life After A Win http://amfi.nl/life-after-a-win/ Tue, 17 Jan 2017 14:27:23 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17063 What does winning a (student) competition do for your study career? And how does it change you as a student?  We spoke to International Fashion & Branding students Travis Rice […]

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What does winning a (student) competition do for your study career? And how does it change you as a student?  We spoke to International Fashion & Branding students Travis Rice and Eleonora Kalabokas who last summer won the prestigious ISKO Denim Award.

Interview by Emma Wendt 2nd year Fashion Branding Student.

 

Travis (in white shirt) and Eleonora (black dress) during the Award Ceremony when they won the ISKO denim competition (Photo taken from Travis’ Portfolio).

Travis (in white shirt) and Eleonora (black dress) during the Award Ceremony when they won the ISKO denim competition (Photo taken from Travis’ Portfolio). Source: ISKO.

After having been advised by their Branding teacher AMFI students Travis Rice and Eleonora Kalabokas took the initiative to participate in the ISKO denim competition last summer. This international competition encourages young individuals to explore innovative approaches within creating and marketing denim on a global level.

 

Their experience was highly inspirational. It gave them both the realization that going all in and taking a risk comes with a reward in the end. A risk they took indeed! Their aim with their concept called “Roughhousing” was to shake up and disrupt conventionality within the denim industry. They wanted to make professionals uncomfortable. Targeting generation Z, their brand lies within a culture where ‘ugly reigns supreme’.

 

Being a part of this new generation of branders, I was intrigued into finding out what insight they can give into the future of the knowingly current plateaued denim industry. Also, what has this experience and win meant for their professional life within the business.

 

Can you describe your winning project?

“We were briefed to create a fictional brand and marketing campaign that would bring ISKO’s new denim fabric further. This new fabric enables one to move without restrictions once inside their denim and is therefore suitable for sports. According to ISKO, athleisure, a fashion trend in which sportswear is worn in other settings such as for casual hangouts, is an opportunity for denim to enter the market of performance wears. We thought the opposite. Denim remains denim. It once represented the rebellious counter culture, the feeling of freedom and ability to do whatever you feel like and that was exactly what we wanted to communicate.”

 

Has your perspective of the denim industry changed after doing the project?

“It is a very specialized industry. The construction and technology around denim is very complicated and extremely diverse in terms of branding. At the same time, the denim industry is stuck in conventional ways of producing and selling and therefore, is facing many challenges ahead.”

 

What do you expect for the future of the denim sector?

“What we expect for the future and what we wish for are two different things. Fashion and denim are evolving slowly. Looking forward, we want fashion to become forward focused. No longer worried about bringing back trends or pleasing the masses. People go for a new phone, because it’s unlike anything they’ve ever seen before. Why can’t fashion adapt that same mentality? Don’t give people what their heart desires, give them what they never even knew was possible.”

 

Are there any noticeable differences in your professional life after this win?

“Our presentation was well received and for this reason, we were asked to speak at Denim Premier Vision on the topic of targeting Generation Z. Taking part in and winning this competition meant that we as young creatives that are soon to be entering the work force are taken seriously. That our voice wants to be heard. However, our voice is not our opinion. What I would advise other students is always back-up your statements, research and findings. Talk to people, hear their testimonies, search the world high and low, READ, READ a lot and from various sources. Only then can you create a clear 360 degree perspective and really put the pieces together in a new and unexpected way.”

 

What did you learn on a personal level? Would you encourage other students to enter competitions?

“Definitely. We learned to really stick to your guts. If you are trying to do something new, innovative, ballsy, you get a lot of pushbacks (i.e. “Are you sure?” “This won’t work.” “Perhaps this is too provocative.” etc.). Fuck that! Words become thought, and thought becomes deeds. What we presented planted a seed in their minds, and hopefully, if we are as convincing as we think we are, that seed will sprout into unforeseen and brilliant action. Thus, this same approach we carry with us at AMFI.

All we can bring to AMFI and the fashion industry is ourselves, and not the watered down version. We put ourselves and all we’ve learned, experienced, and witnessed 110% into our work. No doubts – but certainly the research to back-up why we’re doing what we’re doing and why the world is ready for it (or needs it).”

 

How will this competition benefit your future in the denim industry?

“The competition and the denim minor have given us the foundation to understand the denim world from each and every angle. It is complex and many stakeholders are involved. Each stakeholder holds information, skills, and years of expertise to help perfect and evolve denim. Having this overview will allow us to think outside of traditional norms and incorporate change from each point.”

 

Photo 1 The opening slide to the Brand presentation - visualising and explaining the concept.

Photo 1 The opening slide to the Brand presentation – visualising and explaining the concept.

 

Photo 2 The models used are not professional, baring little to no make up conveying actuality.

Photo 2 The models used are not professional, baring little to no make up conveying actuality.

 

Photo 3 The slideshow is designed as common media layouts such as Google and Tinder. This makes it relatable for the current media focused youth, the now generation.

Photo 3 The slideshow is designed as common media layouts such as Google and Tinder. This makes it relatable for the current media focused youth, the now generation.

ISKO Denim Competition Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFD_OuVVtCQ

Link to Travis Rice’s Portfolio:

http://travis-rice.com/

Link to Eleonora Kalabokas’ Portfolio:

https://www.instagram.com/no-bakes/ 

 

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Searching for the perfect concept http://amfi.nl/searching-perfect-concept/ Wed, 11 Jan 2017 07:40:36 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17040 In year two of Fashion and Branding, branding students are introduced to the challenge of combining previous assignments and create the perfect retail-environment. Interview by Jelske Driessen 2nd year International […]

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In year two of Fashion and Branding, branding students are introduced to the challenge of combining previous assignments and create the perfect retail-environment.

Interview by Jelske Driessen 2nd year International Fashion & Branding.

On the day just before the Christmas break I spoke to two students who worked together for the past six weeks on a project called ‘Fashion Retail Environment’. This project is a combination of knowledge from two previous projects ‘Living Room Viewing Box’ and ‘Jeans Brand Data Base’– the first researching & visualizing target groups, the second providing an overview of the jeans market.  Students are asked to link the brand and a consumer group that is not yet targeted, and create a retail environment in which brand and consumer meet. I interviewed Lea Ermuth and Celia Freiling from International Fashion & Branding and asked them about their experiences.

The weeks of hard work are finally translated in a 3D presentation .

The weeks of hard work are finally translated in a 3D presentation .

Can you tell me a little bit about your concept?

“We brought together the jeans brand Edwin and a consumer tribe labeled ‘Selective Academics’, 40 plus wealthy men and women, focused on mothers. We wanted to include the Japanese heritage of the brand in the shop, but not in an obvious way. We took the floor culture of Japan (think about sitting and sleeping on the floor) and use it to give unusual retail experience. The center and the clothing display are on the same level as the ground. Our store is also completely transformable, so in no time you can remove the clothing and close the space, and you’ll get a seamless no nail open space that can be used for events and to built a community.”

 

re2

A closer look at the Fashion environment designed by Lea and Celia.

What retail environments inspired you and would you recommend to us?

“No actual existing retail environment inspired us, but mostly exhibitions. The Jean Tinguely exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum was an amazing example for bringing experience to an art exhibition. Alexander Girard who is currently exhibited at the Vitra Design Museum also inspired us. We did not believe in looking at existing retail environments to come up with a new concept. It has all already been done. We believe in the interaction of design, art, fashion and architecture to create something exciting and alluring.”

 

What is the best about working in pairs?

“It was very nice having two people completely into one project, so you always have someone to talk to and make decisions together, which makes it a lot easier. And of course you can also motivate each other.”

 

What did you like most about the project?

“Working in pairs! But of course also the final execution. You’ve put so much work into it as there are so many parts to this project and on the last couple of days you really see everything come together and you see it all on one board. It is a great feeling when it then turns out to be a strong whole.”

 

How is this project different from previous projects at AMFI?

“First of all the group work, and due to the group work the scale of the project is so much bigger. This project was a combination of fashion, design, graphic design and architecture. Therefore we also needed to learn new design programs, like Vectorworks in which you can design 3-d.”

 

How is this project important for a brander?

“It introduces you with the retail aspect of Branding. For a brander who sees a future in retail environments or working for a brand this project is very accurate and revealing. And even if you do not end up working in retail environments, you do know what it is all about.”

 

What tip can you give a future AMFI student that will do this project?

“Start early. Also very important is to divide your work carefully from the beginning, and recognize each other’s skills. Another important aspect is to always reflect on your decisions and if it fits to your concept.”

 

How do you see the future of retail and the fashion environment?

“What was very clear to us was that it is all about the experience. You have to give customers a reason why they should go to a physical space instead of shopping online. It was clear that this was a trend in retail and thus a way to survive in the future. Shops are not only shops and the experience becomes more important than selling products.”

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Denim students take on Italy! http://amfi.nl/denim-students-take-italy/ Wed, 28 Dec 2016 17:29:41 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17021 By Eva van Stekelenburg, 4th year Fashion & Branding (and Denim student!)   Last month, the students of the minor Denim took a trip to Italy, where they visited the […]

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By Eva van Stekelenburg, 4th year Fashion & Branding (and Denim student!)

Image: Inspecting denim samples at chemical company ‘Nearchimica’ (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Image: Inspecting denim samples at chemical company ‘Nearchimica’ (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

 

Last month, the students of the minor Denim took a trip to Italy, where they visited the important factories that make the denim world go round, including the Candiani Mills. The Denim Minor is an AMFI minor that unites all three departments of the Institute (Branding, Management and Design) and is welcoming exchange students as well. Together they work on creating a sub brand for an already existing brand. This semester sub brands are created for for G-Star, Denham and Kings of Indigo (also known as K.O.I.). With its hands-on approach, it is an exciting minor that feels like a reality school programme. As a part of the minor students get to experiment in the Amsterdam-based ‘Blue Lab’ denim laundry, collaborate with the famous Candiani Denim Mills as well as visit the headquarters of the brand they are working for. It’s an opportunity to establish many new contacts and discover the intricate world of denim.
 

Image: Cotton being spun at the Candiani Mills (Image by Eva van Stekelenburg)

Image: Cotton being spun at the Candiani Mills (Image by Eva van Stekelenburg)

Along with minor coordinators Jo Watson, and – not to be missed – denim enthusiast Guido Kerssens we met in the early hours of the day at Schiphol, where we smoothly checked in despite some oversized hand-luggage. During the flight most of us took advantage to doze off and dream about perfect twill weaves and Italian Selvedge denim. After our touchdown in the Italian countryside of Milano we made our way over to the Candiani Denim Mills. Here, (the very handsome) Simon was awaiting us and wished us a warm welcome to the factory – literally, with homemade oven spaghetti dishes and the softest mozzarella, salads and Bresaola.
 

Image: Simon from Candiani explaining the denim production process on-site. (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Image: Simon from Candiani explaining the denim production process on-site. (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

At the Candiani Mills we revised the samples we had sent out to be made – based on our technical packs. We got to meet the factory workers that had made our jeans samples and experience hands-on what it’s like to collaborate with a factory – interesting! We also got a facility tour from Simon and we got to see the actual denim production process, from raw cotton till a finished pair of jeans.

 

Image: Discussing our designs at Candiani (Image credits: Eva van Stekelenburg)

Image: Discussing our designs at Candiani (Image credits: Eva van Stekelenburg)

Next stop was the world’s biggest trim supplier ‘Prym’, located in a beautiful valley two hours from Milano. Here we got a guided tour of the whole facility in English-Italian. Amongst all the buzzing machines and mechanical devices (making a tremendous amount of noise) we found buttons in production for Louis Vuitton, Won Hundred, Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein. Once again we realized there is so much still to learn when it comes to the production of clothes!

 

During our trip we also visited chemical company Nearchimica. Fellow Denim Minor student Jade van Straalen (3rd year Fashion & Management ) also visited the factory: “In the early morning on Wednesday we went to Legnano to the Nearchimica Spa factory. We had a great presentation about their sustainable processes and dyestuffs. I really appreciated they admitted to areas where they could still improve as they feel they are still using too much water and chemicals with which they can never be completely sustainable. Personally, I am still convinced ‘sustainability’ is often used as a marketing tool and you never know how sustainable a factory really is. By changing a little small thing you can already say that it is ‘sustainable’. So it’s hard so say, when is something really sustainable?”
 
“At Nearchimica we also had a tour of all the different machines. The only downside to machines is that there are so many interesting things happening inside the machine it’s a pity you can only look at the outside.” One example of where we all would like to see what is happening inside is in a Jeans-Baking-Oven-Box machine. With stretch being used more often in jeans, most of us thought stretch was determined by the weave of the fabric. To our surprise there was another method:  a chemist at Nearchimica informed us that there are ‘oven’ machines that can determine the amount of stretch in a material – its elasticity – depending on how long the fabric is baked. The longer the fabric is ‘baked’, the less stretch it contains.
 

Image credits: Hugo Henri Guthan (Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Image credits: Hugo Henri Guthan (Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Over the duration of these four days in Italy, we visited countless factories that produced all elements that make up a deceivingly ‘simple’ pair of jeans. We learned that in reality, jeans are all but simple!

We already knew that for one pair of jeans an average of 6000 liters of water is needed, but actually seeing the whole production process is quite something different than just reading about it. It was also interesting to see how all the firms are working on making the production process more sustainable and I realised that as a Branding student I can add to that in the future. For instance by informing consumers they can participate in making fashion more sustainable by educating them about how to take care of clothes!

 

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Clash show part 2- Marni en Versace http://amfi.nl/clash-show-part-2-marni-en-versace/ Fri, 23 Dec 2016 09:02:46 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16994  Stephanie Barbian 2nd Year Fashion & Management student The 2nd year Fashion & Design student’s aim was to find the balance between their assigned luxury brand and the sportswear brand […]

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 Stephanie Barbian 2nd Year Fashion & Management student

The 2nd year Fashion & Design student’s aim was to find the balance between their assigned luxury brand and the sportswear brand Nike, which would result in a perfect “Clash”.
 
The student’s latest project was called Studio, in which design students are positioned as commercial designers within the four brands Gucci, Balenciaga, Marni and Versace. After researching, building concepts and designing collections, Clash brands uniting both the values of the mother brand and the values of the sportswear brand Nike were established. The outcomes were shown to the students, teachers and public on the annual Clash Show at Kohnstammhuis.
 
Eight Fashion & Design Students were selected to share their ideas behind the concept and the design.
 
Kateryna Boiko – Marni men
“My group and I worked according to a self-created trend forecast. We chose the 90s, which perfectly combines the balance of serious but also playful designs. The collection is a lot about Marni connected with Nike’s street feel. We were not thinking about economical shapes or innovative materials, the feel counted the most for us. All my garments have a ¾ length aiming to give the wearer the possibility to wear them any time. Our approach on sustainability was the inspiration of using production leftovers from the original brands resulting in trading and reusing fabrics within my Clash group.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

Kim van den Brule – Marni women – denim
“I used the high-fashion way of constructing pattern. I made a bodysuit of denim, which was really challenging since a bodysuit always needs to fit well and my selection of fabric is special in that case. What is really cool about Marni, is the timelessness. While researching the collections, body silhouettes and exciting prints were always present, however everything can be mixed with each other. My group and I took over these values for our Clash brand and combined it with comfort and innovation; Nike’s brand values. The result of this is high fashion with a streetwear feel. As an addition to my designs, I created sunglasses and jewellery made out of PVC by using the laser cut. What I find interesting about the laser cut is that I was able to create my accessories without any waste.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

Maud Op’t Land – Marni women
“What I especially like about this project is the combination of the heritage of a luxury brand with a sportswear brand, which is known by everybody. For me it was most important to look at the mother brand Marni, I wanted to create something special but still wearable matching the Nike perspective. Marni stands for a recognizable colour combination and exaggerated elements. My outfit includes really long sleeves and a silhouette inspired by Marni. Next to that, the inspiration of Marni is also noticeable in the usage of polka dots, which in my case are three-dimensional pompoms placed all over my pants. Nike is about multifunctionality and comfort; in my outfit the jacket is reversible and my pockets are detachable, which gives the wearer more options to wear the outfit.”

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

Wannes Akop – Versace men
“The Clash project really fits to the Zeitgeist of fashion right now. A lot of brands start with this trend; it is all about mixing high end with high street. For me, the combination Versace and Nike was achieved throughout finishing. If I think about Versace, I picture shine and glamour, which is not really up to my alley but by applying foil which melts on fabrics a shiny texture was created. What I link with Nike is the need of being visible when doing sports, reflective band is attached to my design as a detail reminding of Nike. The detachability of a garment plays a huge role in my collection. My bomber jacket is originally attached to the pants through zippers, giving the wearer the total freedom to create any style he wants. For me, the idea of sustainability comes down to multipurpose and detachability.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

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Clash Show part 1- Gucci & Balenciaga http://amfi.nl/clash-show-part-1-gucci-balenciaga/ Thu, 22 Dec 2016 08:59:21 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16982 By  Stephanie Barbian 2nd Year Fashion & Management The 2nd year Fashion & Design student’s aim was to find the balance between their assigned luxury brand and the sportswear brand Nike, which […]

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By  Stephanie Barbian 2nd Year Fashion & Management

The 2nd year Fashion & Design student’s aim was to find the balance between their assigned luxury brand and the sportswear brand Nike, which would result in a perfect “Clash”.
 
The student’s latest project was called Studio, in which design students are positioned as commercial designers within the four brands Gucci, Balenciaga, Marni and Versace. After researching, building concepts and designing collections, Clash brands uniting both the values of the mother brand and the values of the sportswear brand Nike were established. The outcomes were shown to the students, teachers and public on the annual Clash Show at Kohnstammhuis.
 
Eight Fashion & Design Students were selected to share their ideas behind the concept and the design.
 
Naouar Abri – Gucci men – denim

“When I was young, I loved to experiment with denim. I made exciting skirts from old jeans. After a while, I was done with it but through AMFI I got back to it. I was selected to do Gucci men and the brand offered a lot of freedom to come up with various ideas. My group and I went for the classic Gucci core values combined with the innovative aspect of Nike when designing our collection. My design included classic pants with a silicone coating combined with a sporty sweater. I manipulated material used for the sweater through cooking it with marbles to create a new and exciting shape. All in all, my group’s concept is all about being genderless, blurring menswear with womenswear. Just like Gucci does it – changing the genders.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

 

Juris Efernis – Gucci women – denim

“For me, what Nike was doing for Gucci concerning my designs, was calming it down. Gucci is very eclectic, whereas Nike is about movement, minimalism and colour blogging. Nike gave me the direction I wanted to go, taking off from the core of Gucci; its silhouette, prints and textures. Inspired by denim, I wanted to use the material in a different and more exciting way, to not get the feel of it in the first place. I used untreated denim not only for the appearance but also to include sustainability, since dyeing is harmful for the environment. Next to that, in every design of the collection a QR code is implemented either in embroidery or print with the purpose of increasing the value of the garments through giving access to events and discounts for the youth.”

 

Photo by Anne Hospers

Photo by Anne Hospers

 

Ruben Vogt – Balenciaga men

“To see the combination of Balenciaga and Nike as a whole in my outfit was the most important for me. I was inspired by Demna Gvasalia, Balenciaga’s new artistic director, who is deconstructing classical garments. My outfit was based on the idea of deconstruction a construction; my coat has a clear structure through the webbing but it is deconstructed by different cut outs. Also, seeing the surface of fabrics plays a huge role in my design. Referring to the architectural style Brutalist, the surface of my material is manipulated to create a rough look. To include the sportswear aspect, I applied reflective tape to inlay of the coat, so whenever the wearer moves you will always see a certain light in it through the reflection.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

 

Marta Fernandes Lopez – Balenciaga women

“We focused on Balenciaga’s brand values and connected these with small sportswear elements to refer to Nike. My coat has a curved shape in the front part, a typical aesthetic for the mother brand Balenciaga. Throughout the use of the material tencel and details in bright colours the sportswear feel is connected with silhouettes inspired by Balenciaga. The outfit is seasonless not only in means of having the ability to detach but also through stepping back in the choice of colour, sticking with a plain colour palette.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

 

 

 

 

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Sustainability: live what you’ve learned http://amfi.nl/sustainability-live-youve-learned/ Mon, 19 Dec 2016 13:40:10 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16889 By Celia Marie Freiling, 2nd year student International Fashion & Branding As fashion students we learn about the consequences of the fashion system on a daily base. We are urged […]

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By Celia Marie Freiling, 2nd year student International Fashion & Branding

As fashion students we learn about the consequences of the fashion system on a daily base. We are urged to think about sustainable solutions. I wondered how this impacts the lives of my fellow students and  asked a few of them what changes they made in their everyday life since they started at AMFI.

 

Lea (Fashion & Branding):

“I’m eating vegan and I stopped buying ready-made food. I’m cooking a lot at home and take it to school when needed. I get a lot of my inspiration through blogs like shanyaraleonie.com.

I’m proud that I stopped using any animal (tested) products and I already noticed I’m becoming more minimal when it comes to clothing. Ideally I want my clothes to fit more situations so I will need and buy less!”

 

Lea (F&B)

Lea (F&B)

Francesca (Fashion & Management):

“Since I’ve started at Amfi I have become really more conscious about fashion and its consequences because we urged to look at different approaches. The website copenhagenfashionsummit.com gives a lot of solutions for sustainable fashion. It shows a lot of videos that are sort of Ted-talks-on-fashion-only.  Some of them really helped me develop some of the projects I did at AMFI. In the future I would love to go into retail and find solutions to make sustainability in fashion a normal issue in the industry.”

 

Francesca

Francesca

Lea (Fashion & Management):

“I’m trying to buy only organic products as well as locally sourced products from the market. When I go shopping I refuse to use plastic bags, so I take a reusable bag. Emmajohn.nl is a blog that inspires me every day to live a zero waste life, not only with lifestyle tips but also recipes!”

 

Lea (F&M)

Lea (F&M)

 

Victoria (Fashion & Management):

“I started eating vegan one year ago, which I think is already more sustainable. Furthermore I joined Lena-the fashion library (lena-library.com) in Amsterdam where you can borrow clothes. So without buying something I have always access to new clothes, but not at the expense of people and the environment!”

 

“Conor (Fashion & Management):

“I’m wearing my socks twice before I wash them! Seriously, if we would all wash our clothes less often, it would save so much water! We often treat our clothes not the right way so they start to look used sooner. One many online guides on how to treat your clothes with care: http: link.

 

Conor

Conor

Katharina (Fashion & Branding):

“Something that really has changed in the last year is that I think twice before I buy something.

That is how we started a girls group to swap our clothing. We now meet bi-weekly and so end up with a different wardrobe every fortnight. Rehash clothes is a platform, where you can exchange your clothes for free and find a community for it.”

 

Katharina

Katharina

Sofia (Fashion & Branding):

“In the last year I became more conscious about my whole way of living. I realized that I was buying too many clothes and became more confident with the wardrobe I have. I started eating vegan because of the documentary Food Choices on Netflix. It is not only about food, but also open your eyes about other global issues we are facing today. It inspired me for my professional future: I plan to become part of a small brand that is not as profit oriented as like the big companies and conscious and educating towards the consumer.”

 

Sarah & Claire (Fashion & Branding):

“We are buying a lot vintage or at flea markets. Vintage pieces tend to have more character than clothes you get at H&M or Primark and usually have a better quality! Furthermore we are informing ourselves about the brands we buy. Ecouterre.com is a nice website to find out how brands implement sustainability into their collections and projects.”

 

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The path to real innovation http://amfi.nl/path-real-innovation/ Fri, 16 Dec 2016 13:47:59 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16963 Written by Marisol Reuter, 4th year student Int. Fashion & Branding Brands & Innovation is a future thinking specialization that focuses every year on a new trend. After extensive research […]

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Written by Marisol Reuter, 4th year student Int. Fashion & Branding

Brands & Innovation is a future thinking specialization that focuses every year on a new trend. After extensive research into the topic, we create innovative concepts and prototypes for fashion brands in 2026. This year’s trend: Realness.

 

So, what is real? Are some things more real than others? And what does Realness mean in the fashion industry? Some of the broadest and possibly most mindf*cking questions out there. With an average of 9 billion answers, this is the kind of question perfectly suited for a specialisation like Brands & Innovation.

With this in mind, 25 students started discussing, mind mapping and researching the meaning of what is real – resulting in around 70 different answers and angles. To quote some of my fellow students: “To me, real is something I can explain. Something that is and feels natural”, says Iris Mateboer who wrote an article about how we can be fooled and how we can hack our brains in order to see reality. Lisa Steur on the other hand, decided to focus on how real children are, as they behave without being influenced by judgment or shame. On a different note, Florien Mes asked herself if anything around us could be considered real as we might just as well live in a computer simulation.

 

Luxumbra, our first group product, combines the articles, interviews and photo series of all students; a bible offering insight into the diversity of the Realness trend.

Luxumbra, our first group product, combines the articles, interviews and photo series of all students; a bible offering insight into the diversity of the Realness trend.

 

All can be true; none of it can be true. And that is the beauty and excitement of this topic: the definition of Realness is personal – and so is this specialisation.

For the first time at AMFI, I felt I had absolute creative freedom. While it’s obvious that there are still criteria to meet, there is no right or wrong. Because, who is supposed to tell you that your vision on Realness is not correct?

This semester goes far beyond fashion and gives us the opportunity to focus on what you think is interesting. At all times, coaches challenge you to leave the desk: experiment, talk to people, share ideas, watch movies (I have never watched that many movies for an AMFI semester!), go to the theatre, travel, and so on. Soon you will notice that almost anything can be inspirational and a starting point for a ‘Realness discussion’. As Lisa Steur put it: “I can be more experimental and let loose from all the rules I set myself. It challenges me to dare and do more.”

Our field trip to Texel for example, proved that meeting cows, hiking through the mud and being isolated from media and daily struggles, can feel rather liberating and real. By creating uncommon rules such as “All people are identified by numbers instead of names. You can only talk to each other by number”, we were able to create our own reality and approach our research topic from a new angle.

 

Field trip to the island Texel: How real is a landscape that is entirely man-made?

Field trip to the island Texel: How real is a landscape that is entirely man-made?

 

And yes, I have to admit that there are times of doubt and frustration, as I am overwhelmed with information and don’t know how to filter it. Having that much creative freedom and the constant drill to not only think outside the box, but preferably outside the universe can be difficult and exhausting. Finding the right way of working and doing things that will spark your personal creativity is key. And yes, this can also mean going to a party, meditating or reading comic books.

During this semester, you will learn to discover which of these learning and creating methods work best for you and what subjects will get the best ideas out of you. With sometimes peculiar approaches, such as ‘think of your favourite animal and then see how you can apply their traits to your concept’, this semester has given me the opportunity to get out of my comfort zone. With toolshops of hands-on making, drawing as well as strategic concepting and marketing, we get a broad range of inspirational tips where every creative mind is being challenged in its own way.

 

The maker’s week opens eyes and minds to new possibilities of creating a prototype of your idea.

The maker’s week opens eyes and minds to new possibilities of creating a prototype of your idea.

 

As the name suggests, Brands & Innovation is all about innovative thinking. It is about finding your personal vision on innovation and looking at the fashion industry as well as society from a different angle. And above all, it is about shaping the future with the knowledge of yesterday, the creativity of today and the tools of tomorrow.

 

If you want to find out more about what we do, check out our website and Instagram page:

 

http://www.amfiinnovative.nl/
@amfiinnovative

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“Love what you are doing” http://amfi.nl/love-what-you-are-doing/ Thu, 15 Dec 2016 09:46:06 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16950 Interview by Marjolijn Oostermeijer, 2nd year Int. Fashion & Branding Generations of students will have good memories about the drawing classes by Martin Coppes and Anke Louwerse. This week AMFI says […]

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Interview by Marjolijn Oostermeijer, 2nd year Int. Fashion & Branding

Generations of students will have good memories about the drawing classes by Martin Coppes and Anke Louwerse. This week AMFI says goodbye to both teachers whose positivity will be greatly missed. In this short interview they look back on their memories at our school. No doubt more stories will follow during their farewell party.

 

Martin Coppes and Anke Louwerse in the AMFI garden

Martin Coppes and Anke Louwerse in the AMFI garden

After a combined 57 years of teaching, drawing teachers Martin Coppes and Anke Louwerse retire from their jobs at AMFI. Anke started 32 years ago at one of the schools that later became part of AMFI, the Charles Montaigne academy. At that time all students had an obligatory 2-3 hours of drawing per week. She taught mostly first and second year students, so a quick estimate is that well over a thousand students have been infected by the positivity of Anke! The numbers of Martin should not be far behind, as he taught at AMFI for 25 years, from first years to graduates…and we are pretty sure quite a few former students every now and then still think about his dreamy blue eyes. ;)

 

Do you remember your first day of teaching? 

Anke: “I remember it perfectly. I was very nervous as I explained the assignment. It was a class with a model who took on a pose and I said ‘start’ – and then… Nothing happened! Students were just staring at me… And then I realized I forgot to hand out the paper!”

Martin: “Anke and I knew each other professionally and I had been teaching before. I replaced Anke when she was pregnant and had been in front of a class before, so maybe that is why I don’t have any specific memories about my first day. I do remember a lot of the students being excited about having a man in front of the class for a change!”

 

What are you going to miss most about AMFI?

Anke: “The students! “

Martin: “ Agree with Anke and I will miss most of all my mentor students. I’ve always been a mentor for the international classes and in that role I always followed them from the start all the way to their graduation. That creates a bond that once in a while leads to class dinner parties in my studio.”

Anke: “And I’ll miss the drawing classroom. We always call it ‘The Cathedral’ because of the high ceilings and the beautiful light. It is in the building next to the AMFI-building and has a pleasant atmosphere. Oh, and I’ll definitely miss the nice coffees I always got during the breaks.”

Martin: “When we started we were mostly in the drawing room and during a meeting we would discuss the progress of students, which worked well for me – so I definitely won’t miss filling in forms and all the other bureaucracy that got added to the job in later years!”

 

What is your best memory of your time here?

Anke: “In Dutch you have the word ‘geluk’ (meaning: happiness), and ‘gelukt ‘(meaning:  succeeded). Whenever I had a really good class with motivated students, being on a roll while teaching and good results it always gave a feeling of happiness and succeeding: Geluk en gelukt!”

Martin: “For me the best memories involve the moments my mentor students graduated. I’d seen them for four years steadily develop and mature. Seeing them finally graduate and succeed in reaching their goal always made me very happy.”

 

What is one of the funniest memories of your time here?

Martin: “My students had to draw feet. They didn’t like that because they thought feet were awful, stinky and ugly. So I gave them homework to every day clean or massage the feet of their loved ones, or their own feet. All students ended up liking feet and drawing them! At the end of the year I received a big drawing of the footprints of all of my students.”

Anke: “Once a student lost one of her contact lenses in the toilet. She was very upset because at that time contacts were quite expensive. I ended up with my hands in the toilet trying to find it for her… I can’t even remember if I got it or not!”

Martin: “And I remember a student who drew the model ‘mirror-wise’, but perfectly. That was really a curious phenomenon and interesting – I did not really follow her later on, but I wonder now if she might have been a bit like Leonardo da Vinci, who wrote mirror-wise.”

 

What plans do you have now you have more free time?

Martin: “We are both professional artists, so I’m definitely going to paint more. I also have an old Morris Minor, a 60 year old car that really would love my attention.”

Anke: I promised some people to paint their portraits, so I’ll finally get on with that. I’m also a reader at ‘de Voorleesexpress’ an initiative where volunteers read to children. So I’ll be reading stories to two adorable children. I love it!”

 

Any last tips for the students?

Anke: “Many students are afraid of drawing because it involves giving something personal and that can be threatening. So I would say: discover the pleasure of drawing and try out all kinds of materials! The most important thing is to like what you are doing and have fun with it!”

Martin: “Everything you have to do, do it with love. That’s also why my students had to love their feet first. The same goes for me. I’ve had a lot of pleasure during my years at AMFI and was always was proud to be a teacher at this school. Dedication and love, those are the main things in work and life.”

 

 

You can follow Anke and Martin and see their work on their websites.

 

www.ankelouwerse.nl

www.martincoppes.com

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Getting to know the product – part 2 http://amfi.nl/getting-know-product-part-2/ Wed, 14 Dec 2016 07:45:18 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16943 First semester in fashion – Prototype The first years from all departments at AMFI are in mixed classes during their first semester. The students work on three projects. Last week […]

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First semester in fashion – Prototype

The first years from all departments at AMFI are in mixed classes during their first semester. The students work on three projects. Last week they received their grades of the second assignment. We asked them about their experiences.  Interview by Marjolijn Oostermeijer.

 

killian-vos-pt3

 

Project: Prototype

Student: Killian vos

Department: Fashion & Branding

Interview: Marjolijn Oostermeijer

 

What was the project about?

It was about conceptual designing and getting to know the basics of sewing, both by hand and with the machine. We also had classes about technical drawing, and fabrics and techniques like dyeing and weaving. It was very exciting to design and create our own garment, even though it was done with some stress and time pressure. A great overall experience!”

 

What are you most proud of?

“My sketches, I worked really hard on them. And of course the final prototype itself.”

 

killian-vos-pt2

 

What have you learned about yourself?

“I used to be really perfectionistic, but I had to let that go during the project: there was too much to do! I still want to do it right, but I managed to not be the perfectionist I normally am.”

 

What was an obstacle, and how did you overcome it?

“The sewing, I really struggled with the seam book. To be honest: I didn’t really like it, so I still have to finish it.”

 

What knowledge/which new skill did you gain?

I gained a lot of knowledge about fabrics while making the fabric book. I think this is important for an AMFI student. Knowing how to sew can always come at hand.”

 

Why is this project important for fashion studies?

“Every fashion student should know about fabrics, construction and the design process. As I will enrol into the Branding department next semester, at first I thought making a prototype would not be very relevant for me. Now I realise that even a seam could play a crucial role in the communication of your brand.”

 

What tip would you give to a future student?

Always make sure you set and make your personal deadlines. Don’t leave anything for the last moment because you’ll end up with a pile of work, no time to sleep and you will possibly miss your deadline in the end.”

killian-vos-pt4

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