AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Thu, 16 Feb 2017 15:37:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 The ones to watch! http://amfi.nl/the-ones-to-watch/ Thu, 16 Feb 2017 13:03:19 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17232 In case you missed the movies in cinema during Amsterdam Fashion Week: AMFI proudly presents the six fashion films that were made during the Fashion & Visual Culture programme!  We […]

The post The ones to watch! appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

In case you missed the movies in cinema during Amsterdam Fashion Week: AMFI proudly presents the six fashion films that were made during the Fashion & Visual Culture programme!  We hope you will enjoy them as much as we did!  =}}  https://vimeo.com/album/3247351

AMFIFashionFilms2017

Image taken from Wooden it be nice inspired by the collection of designer Christina Albrecht; made by Almut Pumpluen, Tessa Ponjée, Susanna Jansen, Sela Clark, Eva Busschers & Celeste Mostert.

The post The ones to watch! appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Triptiek 2017 Gallery http://amfi.nl/triptiek-2017-gallery/ Thu, 09 Feb 2017 17:25:18 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17228 As we can’t get enough from it, we present the best photos from the 2017 Triptiek event! Article by Roy Doron  2nd year International Fashion & Branding 250 AMFI students from […]

The post Triptiek 2017 Gallery appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

As we can’t get enough from it, we present the best photos from the 2017 Triptiek event!

Article by Roy Doron  2nd year International Fashion & Branding

250 AMFI students from all departments, 200 faculty members and professionals from the industry, and many, many friends and families came to support the young talents during the  annual second year students event Triptiek  on the 24th of January 2017 in Amsterdam’s Het Sieraad.  They saw brand presentations of 10 fashion concepts that were developed in only two weeks, and of course a spectacular fashion show.

The highlights of the event were caught on camera by two professional fashion  photographers, Cornelis Blokbergen and Mykola Bugai and three of our first year students at AMFI:  Magda Domagala, Kate Vasilieva and Miriam Rahel. We selected their best shots for you to enjoy!

 

More fun with the photo frame! (Photo by Miriam Rahel). Mykola - 34UNMUTE model posing for our photographer Mykola Bugai Students Emilija and Branco enjoying the UNCANNY experience (Photo by Mykola Bugai). Models circle line up during the final presentation. Ready to party! (Photo by Mykola Bugai). Mixing make-up and outfit in the Ka Paw presentation (Photo by Mykola Bugai). All white garment of Ka Paw (Photo by Mykola Bugai). Back shot of the Revolt collection (Photo by Mykola Bugai). 27's model walking the runway with confidence (Photo by Mykola Bugai). Students squeezing together in the frame at the photo-booth (Photo by Miriam Rahel). Vita from the brand Revolt 'tatooing' their brand logo on the arm of an admirer. (Photo by Magda Domagala). UNMUTE walking the runway, here still pretty dark – later tension would get released with their funny dance (Photo by Magda Domagala).by Miriam Rahel). Revolt model in close-up (Photo by Magda Domagala). Revolt models striking a fierce pose (Photo by Magda Domagala). Kapaw model making his way through the crowd (Photo by Magda Domagala). Aerial shot of the runway during the final parade at the end of the show (Photo by Magda Domagala). Backstage the UNMUTE team preparing their models for the show (Photo: Kate Vasilieva). Most fun part during the show: the UNMUTE models leaving the catwalk in an unexpected comical dance (Photo: Kate Vasilieva). the UNMUTE model getting ready backstage – she made a great entrance! (Photo: Kate Vasilieva). Back stage hair and make-up preperations for the presentation of the brand Symbiosis (Photo: Kate Vasilieva). Talk about fierce eye make-up! EPNY's model backstage preperations ( Photo: Kate Vasilieva). D'CEP models getting ready for the runway (Photo: Kate Vasilieva). Backstage make-up for the MAT.MAT model (Photo: Kate Vasilieva). Behind the scenes, make-up preperations on of the models of the brand 7 (Photo: Kate Vasilieva). Model cruising the stairs during the presentation of the MAT.MAT collection (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). The knitwear theme coming back in the 3-d brand presentation of Uncanny: the comfort of discomfort (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). Heavy structured knitwear in the collection of Uncanny (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). Dramatic long silhouettes in the collection of the brand Tonik (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). Symbiosis  contemporary dancer surrounded by the group members (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). Lead model of the brand Symbiosis paving the way on  the catwalk (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). Brand logo of team Revolt on the screen during the fashion show. Quite a few people got a Revolt tattoo that night! (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen) Model of the brand EPNY posing on the smokey runway. (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). Fairy tale opening of the show: Daan Lutgendorff  playing the cello under the inflatable moon. (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). All brand presented a collection of three outfits. Here the presentation of the brand 27 - a group that also presented an awsome brand video. (Photo: Cornelis Blokbergen). Cornelis-Daan-Lutgendorff-playing-the-cello-under-the-inflatable-moon. The EPNY models present the brand collection at Triptiek 2017 fashion show.

The post Triptiek 2017 Gallery appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
iNDiViDUALS: balance between creativity and commercialism http://amfi.nl/individuals-balance-creativity-commercialism/ Tue, 07 Feb 2017 13:16:29 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17208 Last week iNDiViDUALS presented the new collection during a intriguing show. We spoke to three students to find out how the harmonious collection was created within 20 weeks. Article by […]

The post iNDiViDUALS: balance between creativity and commercialism appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Last week iNDiViDUALS presented the new collection during a intriguing show. We spoke to three students to find out how the harmonious collection was created within 20 weeks.

Article by Stephanie Barbian, 2nd Year International Fashion & Management. All photos by Team Peter Stigter.

 

iNDiViDUALS is a specialisation programme that fuses the three programmes offered by AMFI – Amsterdam Fashion Institute: Design, Management and Branding. Every season a new generation of students  develop the brand further. Each individual from each department is responsibly working according to a specific job role, constantly trying to respond to the Zeitgeist and aiming for a balance between creativity and commercialism.

Right before the show: making sure the models enter the catwalk in the right order.

Right before the show: making sure the models enter the catwalk in the right order.

Individuals Generation 22 presented its A/W 2017 Show on Wednesday January 25th at Loods 6. It was an impressing presentation of an inspirational collection showing a mixture of the 90’s grunge movement, the roaring 20’s era and the current Zeitgeist. Three Specialisation students Danique Grosjean (Fashion & Branding), Faralda Boerwinkel (Fashion & Design) and Mandy Muijs (Fashion & Management) shared their experience on working for iNDiViDUALS and especially of the making of Generation 22.

 

Starting with your concept idea: “3 am – what a time to be awake” what is behind it?

Mandy: “3 am – what a time to be awake. When it is 3 am and you find yourself in your bed asking yourself what the reason is for you to be awake, being annoyed and frustrated whilst at the same time you could be dancing in the club having the time of your life. There is a contradiction in your mind.”

 

What is the source of your inspiration and how did you implement it in the collection?

Faralda Boerwinkel: “The presented A/W 17 collection was inspired by the 90’s grunge movement and the roaring 20’s era. For us – both of these times matched in a way, in a way both of them were free and rebellious. Those feelings combined make the aesthetics of the collection. The 20’s dropped waistline and the iconic flannel shirt from the grunge movement are clear references we used. We clashed them with the current Zeitgeist.”

 

In what way does your influence/specialisation of department come back in the current collection?

Danique: “The branding team has the focus on the concept together with the design team and then develops it to the end. Next to that the branding team is generally concentrating on bringing the outcome to the outside world, to the public.”

 

Models in line: the Show is about to start

Models in line: the Show is about to start.

 

What are the responsibilities within the three departments?

Faralda: “For Design in general, we all have our main job role on which we focus the most, which might be a Fabric Manager, Trimmings Manager, Accessories Manager, Print Manager, Studio Manager and Collection Manager. You are the spokesperson of your own job.”

Mandy: “Within Management, everyone takes care of production. So, you will be responsible for two styles from the previous collection, as well as two styles from your own Generation’s collection. When design created the pattern, it is in your responsibility to develop it further. Next to that, each Manager also has their own job role, e.g. General Manager, Production Manager, Sales Manager, CSR Manager or Finance Manager.”

Danique: “In Branding the division is bigger, there is the corporate identity but also seasonal concept within your own Generation. Concerning the seasonal, we can be creative and free in making decisions. While the corporate identity always needs to fit the image, since the corporate identity makes the brand recognizable. When the process begins, the branding team stays as a group while each of us thinks and acts in their own job role until owning It completely after the concept phase.”

 

Managing behind the scenes

Managing behind the scenes

 

What was your biggest challenge while being a part of iNDiViDUALS’s Generation 22?

Mandy: “Communication was a challenge throughout working on Generation 22. Each individual thinks in a different way, especially when differentiating between the departments. Some things might appear logical to the Management students, which will result in a lack of communication, since the Design and Branding students might not know too much about it. It takes time to figure out how much knowledge each department has.”

Faralda: “You are aiming for doing everything as perfect as possible due to working for iNDiViDUALS, a real brand but at the same time you are still in the learning process what means that you cannot do everything perfect. That can be really frustrating.”

Danique: “I get what Faralda is saying, as for me the biggest challenge was being in between reality and school. You work in a real company, but you still have to realise that you are still at school as well.”

 

Generation 22 - job well done! Amfi Individuals A/W17/18 © Team Peter Stigter

Generation 22 – the fruits of a semester of hard work.

 

The work Mandy, Danique and Faralda and all other 22 other talented AMFI students resulted in a successful and exciting A/W 17 show. The concept called “3 am – what a time to be awake” was converted into an experience on the runway by moments of storytelling, flickering lights and lively tunes balanced with the presented collection. Generation 22’s achievement is truly inspirational for prospective Generations.  More info on programme, as well as on the current and previous collections you can find at www.individualsatamfi.nl

 

 

The post iNDiViDUALS: balance between creativity and commercialism appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Behind the scenes of Triptiek 2017: the creation of a fashion brand http://amfi.nl/behind-scenes-triptiek-2017-creation-fashion-brand/ Mon, 30 Jan 2017 09:51:23 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17127 Last week AMFI’s annual Triptiek event hosted 10 fashion brands created by 250 students in mixed-departments groups. One of these brands is EPNY, a brand that pushes for equality and […]

The post Behind the scenes of Triptiek 2017: the creation of a fashion brand appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Last week AMFI’s annual Triptiek event hosted 10 fashion brands created by 250 students in mixed-departments groups. One of these brands is EPNY, a brand that pushes for equality and sustainability. We followed two talented students from EPNY during these two weeks of the project, and got an up-close pick on the creative process through their own experiences.

Article by Roy Doron, 2nd year International Fashion & Branding.

 
Week 1 – Clashing icons research and concept development. Anouk Brouwer and Fiona Matsumoto, second year students Branding and Management, explain together how their group came up with their concept: “We had an interesting clash of present and historical icons as a starting point for the concept. We started from thinking about how the fashion industry is linked to consumerism, and developed a concept upon reaction to human behavior and society norms.

EPNY (image taken from the brand video-shoot).

EPNY (image taken from the brand video-shoot).

How would you conclude your experience within this intensive first week?
Anouk: “During this project the lack of time pushes you. It proved me that I can do more than I thought I could. Also you understand your position in a big group because you naturally take upon different roles. You have the freedom to be a chameleon to obtain different roles because now at Triptiek you suddenly have the option to obtain different roles.
Fiona: “It was a preparation for the future regarding dealing with different departments within the fashion industry. Until now we were focused on aspects that are related only to one department, and now you literally see how different roles look like from mutual daily work. You get to see new student’s way of work which was for me another good preparation for the future.

Anouk and Fiona experimenting with brand shaping and materials.

Anouk and Fiona experimenting with brand shaping and materials.

Week 2 – Designing a 3-piece-collection and developing 2D and 3D brand presentation. During this week part of the group was busy with pitching their concept ideas to their AMFI coaches. Then they finished developing their visual identity; some group members worked on a brand book, some filmed a 30-second brand mood video for the runway and the others started to construct a 3D installation for the event. At the same time the design students from the group were focused on designing and sewing the 3 garments that were later presented in the fashion show.

The designers constructing the EPNY collection, 5 days before the Triptiek show.

The designers constructing the EPNY collection, 5 days before the Triptiek show.

Fiona: “As a manager, this week I focused on business related aspects of the project, like developing financial and investor plans. While touching this subject, I was also in daily touch with our designers and branders, to also take a look on their impressive work, developing our brand identity and garments in a very quick yet professional way.

Behind the scenes of the EPNY team during the second week; working on their 3D installation.

Behind the scenes of the EPNY team during the second week; working on their 3D installation.

How would you now, the day after Triptiek is over, conclude your experience with the whole project?
Anouk: ´´It might sound like a cliché, but I really learned much more than I imagined in this rollercoaster-ride called Triptiek. Not only did I get to know the different way of work of Managers and Designer’s, but I got to know how I react and work within a big group. The evening of the show was incredibly inspirational and fed me lots of energy for the coming semester. All vibes were good and I am proud of what we all accomplished within only two weeks!“

The EPNY models present the brand collection at Triptiek 2017 fashion show.

Foto6

The EPNY models present the brand collection at Triptiek 2017 fashion show.

The EPNY models present the brand collection at Triptiek 2017 fashion show.

The post Behind the scenes of Triptiek 2017: the creation of a fashion brand appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
3D craft – Everything is possible! http://amfi.nl/3d-craft-everything-possible/ Fri, 27 Jan 2017 15:35:05 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17110 The Hypercraft show last week was pretty amazing, but what was it like to design a collection on the computer? We interviewed three third year students about their experience with […]

The post 3D craft – Everything is possible! appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

The Hypercraft show last week was pretty amazing, but what was it like to design a collection on the computer? We interviewed three third year students about their experience with the design programme Lectra.

Article by Jelske Driessen, 2nd year International Fashion & Branding.

 
Monday the 16th of January was a special day for students of the minor 3D hypercraft. It was the day that finalised a semester of hard work and experimenting with the design programme called ‘Lectra’. This software allows designers and managers to skip parts of the pattern-making aspect of design and work digitally. The programme gives an impression of how the design will look like on the body. The students taking part in this minor are asked to come up with a concept and work out their designs in Lectra. Monday the 16th they introduced their collection by showing a short video clip, followed by a runway show presenting their designs.

 

The atmosphere in the Zuiderkerk was quite hectic when I came in. I was very early so the adrenaline from the collection show was still in the air. The church was beautifully lit and very impressive. Near the beginning of the show more and more people came inside. Parents, friends and other AMFI students – all curious about the designs. The Hypercraft show is one to watch for everybody. Seeing the creations which are designed on the computer and to witness what the designers of the future are making is a surprising experience for everybody.
After the 3D-hypercraft event, I interviewed Thijs van der Laan (Design student), Merle Kolman (Design) and Myrna Slagt (Design student).

Can you tell me a what you took as an inspiration for your collection?

Thijs: “My concept started with watching a documentary about the other side of the feminism, it answered the question why men are often seen as more important. This starts with the upbringing of boys and how they are expected to perform well and not show too many emotions. My collection is about a guy who dreams about a world where this is different and where he can also be soft and emotional, like women…”
Myrna: “I never wear my own designs, since we as designers always work with size 34. So I decided to turn it around and design for women with a bigger size from the start. With my lingerie collection I wanted to show that bigger women are also powerful and beautiful.”
Merle: “My inspiration were the dandy’s from the 18th century. These are men who were very fashionable and stylish. I wanted to make a female version of the dandy.”

 

The Dandy inspired collection by Merle Kolman at the shoot (left) and in Lectra (right).

The Dandy inspired collection by Merle Kolman at the shoot (left) and in Lectra (right).

What were your expectations of working with Lectra?
Thijs: “I expected to go way more extreme than I actually did. With Lectra it is so much easier to do this because of the fast alterations you can make. I expected to really challenge the programme, but I ended up using it to perfect the fit and to correctly place the print on the pattern.”
Myrna: “I already worked with the programme. However, I wanted to learn more about it and elaborate it further. I must say it is not really fit for lingerie, because it is not yet developed enough. So that was a challenge I had to experiment with.”
 

The lingerie collection by Myrna Slagt in Lectra and finally worn by a fierce model on the runway.

The lingerie collection by Myrna Slagt in Lectra and finally worn by a fierce model on the runway.

Can you tell me how the Hypercraft minor affected you as a designer?
Thijs: “For me it made it a lot easier to experiment with my designs and create more variations. The programme is also a lot more convenient to work with compared to real life pattern making. It is cleaner, you can make copies, you can alter whenever and whatever you want.”
Merle: “As an intern at G-star I noticed how fast they were able to change the patterns of the clothing. So this was something I wanted to work with during this minor. I felt that for me the programme was quite flat and I also really needed to get used to the fact that I couldn’t feel the texture of the fabric.”
 

Thijs van der Laan and the models wearing his virbrant designs.

Thijs van der Laan and the models wearing his virbrant designs.

How do you think programs like Lectra change the future of design?
Thijs: “Smaller brands that work locally or small ateliers may not really use it yet, but I do think this will change in the future as well. It almost becomes inevitable since fashion changes so fast. Every year a brand gets more seasons and more collections. It also saves workspace, since you only need a computer.”
Merle: “I think that within the world of fast fashion it will be very useful to use the programme. It removes a step and it saves time and money. You can still work very specific like they do with haute couture. Besides that you can also easily change the fabric to see how it looks.”
Myrna: “It quickens the process and it is also a lot more sustainable. However for me it was also quite difficult to distance myself from the tangible process of design. So I do understand how this could be difficult for other designers within brands. But for the future it does make it so much easier to avoid mistakes or change the patterns.”
 

The post 3D craft – Everything is possible! appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Triptiek – 250 Students, 10 Brands, 0 Waste http://amfi.nl/triptiek-250-students-10-brands-0-waste/ Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:55:20 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17078 Walking through the AMFI halls you can feel that something special is happening this week. The annual Triptiek event will take place at Het Sieraad next Tuesday. Until then 250 […]

The post Triptiek – 250 Students, 10 Brands, 0 Waste appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Walking through the AMFI halls you can feel that something special is happening this week. The annual Triptiek event will take place at Het Sieraad next Tuesday. Until then 250 second year students are working full power in  mixed groups to create their fashion brands. We had a look behind the scenes and spoke to the team that is organizing the event.

Article written by Roy Doron and Marjolijn Oostermijer, second year International Fashion & Branding students.
Preparations for the photoshoot of the poster.

Preparations for the photoshoot of the poster.

Triptiek2017 will host 10 brands based on contemporary concept design and a sustainable zero waste vision. Each brand synthesizes historical and modern icons through a fashion concept.

 

This year’s Triptych theme is based on a clash of classical masters with contemporary dark romanticism. The concept and the visual identity of the whole event (?)is developed by another group of students, in charge of the event concept and planning. This team consists of 5 management and 5 branding second year students. The team is also working daily on finding sponsors and collaborations with different local companies for different aspects of the event including music, food and drinks, hair and makeup, photography, printing, floor planning and the event decoration.

 

Dark orange is the primary colour of this year’s Triptiek. Sarah Friedman (L) and Femke Castermans (R).

Dark orange is the primary colour of this year’s Triptiek. Sarah Friedman (L) and Femke Castermans (R).

The event team is working on providing the groups the full set up in the space to present their brands. The 3-piece-collection of each brand will be presented in a fashion show, with a garden as a centre piece, which will be surrounded by the runway. Around this garden, the groups will present their brands in a brand stand and a 3D installation.
 

The event management team developing this year’s concept.

The event management team developing this year’s concept.

Brandi LaCertosa, a Branding student who is part the event management team: “The 10 of us have come together from different departments; both the Dutch and International courses. We pull from our range of experiences and styles, and evaluated our personal strengths to determine where each could contribute the most. It is really a team effort, where every person is essential to create an amazing event. It is mind-blowing what 250 students can pull of in only three weeks – I can promise you the event is going to be extraordinary!”
 

Brandi LeCertosa from the event management team.

Brandi LeCertosa from the event management team.

 

Make sure to get your tickets for the event through http://www.triptiek2017.com/.

The post Triptiek – 250 Students, 10 Brands, 0 Waste appeared first on AMFI.

]]> Life After A Win http://amfi.nl/life-after-a-win/ Tue, 17 Jan 2017 14:27:23 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17063 What does winning a (student) competition do for your study career? And how does it change you as a student?  We spoke to International Fashion & Branding students Travis Rice […]

The post Life After A Win appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

What does winning a (student) competition do for your study career? And how does it change you as a student?  We spoke to International Fashion & Branding students Travis Rice and Eleonora Kalabokas who last summer won the prestigious ISKO Denim Award.

Interview by Emma Wendt 2nd year Fashion Branding Student.

 

Travis (in white shirt) and Eleonora (black dress) during the Award Ceremony when they won the ISKO denim competition (Photo taken from Travis’ Portfolio).

Travis (in white shirt) and Eleonora (black dress) during the Award Ceremony when they won the ISKO denim competition (Photo taken from Travis’ Portfolio). Source: ISKO.

After having been advised by their Branding teacher AMFI students Travis Rice and Eleonora Kalabokas took the initiative to participate in the ISKO denim competition last summer. This international competition encourages young individuals to explore innovative approaches within creating and marketing denim on a global level.

 

Their experience was highly inspirational. It gave them both the realization that going all in and taking a risk comes with a reward in the end. A risk they took indeed! Their aim with their concept called “Roughhousing” was to shake up and disrupt conventionality within the denim industry. They wanted to make professionals uncomfortable. Targeting generation Z, their brand lies within a culture where ‘ugly reigns supreme’.

 

Being a part of this new generation of branders, I was intrigued into finding out what insight they can give into the future of the knowingly current plateaued denim industry. Also, what has this experience and win meant for their professional life within the business.

 

Can you describe your winning project?

“We were briefed to create a fictional brand and marketing campaign that would bring ISKO’s new denim fabric further. This new fabric enables one to move without restrictions once inside their denim and is therefore suitable for sports. According to ISKO, athleisure, a fashion trend in which sportswear is worn in other settings such as for casual hangouts, is an opportunity for denim to enter the market of performance wears. We thought the opposite. Denim remains denim. It once represented the rebellious counter culture, the feeling of freedom and ability to do whatever you feel like and that was exactly what we wanted to communicate.”

 

Has your perspective of the denim industry changed after doing the project?

“It is a very specialized industry. The construction and technology around denim is very complicated and extremely diverse in terms of branding. At the same time, the denim industry is stuck in conventional ways of producing and selling and therefore, is facing many challenges ahead.”

 

What do you expect for the future of the denim sector?

“What we expect for the future and what we wish for are two different things. Fashion and denim are evolving slowly. Looking forward, we want fashion to become forward focused. No longer worried about bringing back trends or pleasing the masses. People go for a new phone, because it’s unlike anything they’ve ever seen before. Why can’t fashion adapt that same mentality? Don’t give people what their heart desires, give them what they never even knew was possible.”

 

Are there any noticeable differences in your professional life after this win?

“Our presentation was well received and for this reason, we were asked to speak at Denim Premier Vision on the topic of targeting Generation Z. Taking part in and winning this competition meant that we as young creatives that are soon to be entering the work force are taken seriously. That our voice wants to be heard. However, our voice is not our opinion. What I would advise other students is always back-up your statements, research and findings. Talk to people, hear their testimonies, search the world high and low, READ, READ a lot and from various sources. Only then can you create a clear 360 degree perspective and really put the pieces together in a new and unexpected way.”

 

What did you learn on a personal level? Would you encourage other students to enter competitions?

“Definitely. We learned to really stick to your guts. If you are trying to do something new, innovative, ballsy, you get a lot of pushbacks (i.e. “Are you sure?” “This won’t work.” “Perhaps this is too provocative.” etc.). Fuck that! Words become thought, and thought becomes deeds. What we presented planted a seed in their minds, and hopefully, if we are as convincing as we think we are, that seed will sprout into unforeseen and brilliant action. Thus, this same approach we carry with us at AMFI.

All we can bring to AMFI and the fashion industry is ourselves, and not the watered down version. We put ourselves and all we’ve learned, experienced, and witnessed 110% into our work. No doubts – but certainly the research to back-up why we’re doing what we’re doing and why the world is ready for it (or needs it).”

 

How will this competition benefit your future in the denim industry?

“The competition and the denim minor have given us the foundation to understand the denim world from each and every angle. It is complex and many stakeholders are involved. Each stakeholder holds information, skills, and years of expertise to help perfect and evolve denim. Having this overview will allow us to think outside of traditional norms and incorporate change from each point.”

 

Photo 1 The opening slide to the Brand presentation - visualising and explaining the concept.

Photo 1 The opening slide to the Brand presentation – visualising and explaining the concept.

 

Photo 2 The models used are not professional, baring little to no make up conveying actuality.

Photo 2 The models used are not professional, baring little to no make up conveying actuality.

 

Photo 3 The slideshow is designed as common media layouts such as Google and Tinder. This makes it relatable for the current media focused youth, the now generation.

Photo 3 The slideshow is designed as common media layouts such as Google and Tinder. This makes it relatable for the current media focused youth, the now generation.

ISKO Denim Competition Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFD_OuVVtCQ

Link to Travis Rice’s Portfolio:

http://travis-rice.com/

Link to Eleonora Kalabokas’ Portfolio:

https://www.instagram.com/no_bokas/ 

 

The post Life After A Win appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Searching for the perfect concept http://amfi.nl/searching-perfect-concept/ Wed, 11 Jan 2017 07:40:36 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17040 In year two of Fashion and Branding, branding students are introduced to the challenge of combining previous assignments and create the perfect retail-environment. Interview by Jelske Driessen 2nd year International […]

The post Searching for the perfect concept appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

In year two of Fashion and Branding, branding students are introduced to the challenge of combining previous assignments and create the perfect retail-environment.

Interview by Jelske Driessen 2nd year International Fashion & Branding.

On the day just before the Christmas break I spoke to two students who worked together for the past six weeks on a project called ‘Fashion Retail Environment’. This project is a combination of knowledge from two previous projects ‘Living Room Viewing Box’ and ‘Jeans Brand Data Base’– the first researching & visualizing target groups, the second providing an overview of the jeans market.  Students are asked to link the brand and a consumer group that is not yet targeted, and create a retail environment in which brand and consumer meet. I interviewed Lea Ermuth and Celia Freiling from International Fashion & Branding and asked them about their experiences.

The weeks of hard work are finally translated in a 3D presentation .

The weeks of hard work are finally translated in a 3D presentation .

Can you tell me a little bit about your concept?

“We brought together the jeans brand Edwin and a consumer tribe labeled ‘Selective Academics’, 40 plus wealthy men and women, focused on mothers. We wanted to include the Japanese heritage of the brand in the shop, but not in an obvious way. We took the floor culture of Japan (think about sitting and sleeping on the floor) and use it to give unusual retail experience. The center and the clothing display are on the same level as the ground. Our store is also completely transformable, so in no time you can remove the clothing and close the space, and you’ll get a seamless no nail open space that can be used for events and to built a community.”

 

re2

A closer look at the Fashion environment designed by Lea and Celia.

What retail environments inspired you and would you recommend to us?

“No actual existing retail environment inspired us, but mostly exhibitions. The Jean Tinguely exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum was an amazing example for bringing experience to an art exhibition. Alexander Girard who is currently exhibited at the Vitra Design Museum also inspired us. We did not believe in looking at existing retail environments to come up with a new concept. It has all already been done. We believe in the interaction of design, art, fashion and architecture to create something exciting and alluring.”

 

What is the best about working in pairs?

“It was very nice having two people completely into one project, so you always have someone to talk to and make decisions together, which makes it a lot easier. And of course you can also motivate each other.”

 

What did you like most about the project?

“Working in pairs! But of course also the final execution. You’ve put so much work into it as there are so many parts to this project and on the last couple of days you really see everything come together and you see it all on one board. It is a great feeling when it then turns out to be a strong whole.”

 

How is this project different from previous projects at AMFI?

“First of all the group work, and due to the group work the scale of the project is so much bigger. This project was a combination of fashion, design, graphic design and architecture. Therefore we also needed to learn new design programs, like Vectorworks in which you can design 3-d.”

 

How is this project important for a brander?

“It introduces you with the retail aspect of Branding. For a brander who sees a future in retail environments or working for a brand this project is very accurate and revealing. And even if you do not end up working in retail environments, you do know what it is all about.”

 

What tip can you give a future AMFI student that will do this project?

“Start early. Also very important is to divide your work carefully from the beginning, and recognize each other’s skills. Another important aspect is to always reflect on your decisions and if it fits to your concept.”

 

How do you see the future of retail and the fashion environment?

“What was very clear to us was that it is all about the experience. You have to give customers a reason why they should go to a physical space instead of shopping online. It was clear that this was a trend in retail and thus a way to survive in the future. Shops are not only shops and the experience becomes more important than selling products.”

The post Searching for the perfect concept appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Denim students take on Italy! http://amfi.nl/denim-students-take-italy/ Wed, 28 Dec 2016 17:29:41 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=17021 By Eva van Stekelenburg, 4th year Fashion & Branding (and Denim student!)   Last month, the students of the minor Denim took a trip to Italy, where they visited the […]

The post Denim students take on Italy! appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

By Eva van Stekelenburg, 4th year Fashion & Branding (and Denim student!)

Image: Inspecting denim samples at chemical company ‘Nearchimica’ (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Image: Inspecting denim samples at chemical company ‘Nearchimica’ (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

 

Last month, the students of the minor Denim took a trip to Italy, where they visited the important factories that make the denim world go round, including the Candiani Mills. The Denim Minor is an AMFI minor that unites all three departments of the Institute (Branding, Management and Design) and is welcoming exchange students as well. Together they work on creating a sub brand for an already existing brand. This semester sub brands are created for for G-Star, Denham and Kings of Indigo (also known as K.O.I.). With its hands-on approach, it is an exciting minor that feels like a reality school programme. As a part of the minor students get to experiment in the Amsterdam-based ‘Blue Lab’ denim laundry, collaborate with the famous Candiani Denim Mills as well as visit the headquarters of the brand they are working for. It’s an opportunity to establish many new contacts and discover the intricate world of denim.
 

Image: Cotton being spun at the Candiani Mills (Image by Eva van Stekelenburg)

Image: Cotton being spun at the Candiani Mills (Image by Eva van Stekelenburg)

Along with minor coordinators Jo Watson, and – not to be missed – denim enthusiast Guido Kerssens we met in the early hours of the day at Schiphol, where we smoothly checked in despite some oversized hand-luggage. During the flight most of us took advantage to doze off and dream about perfect twill weaves and Italian Selvedge denim. After our touchdown in the Italian countryside of Milano we made our way over to the Candiani Denim Mills. Here, (the very handsome) Simon was awaiting us and wished us a warm welcome to the factory – literally, with homemade oven spaghetti dishes and the softest mozzarella, salads and Bresaola.
 

Image: Simon from Candiani explaining the denim production process on-site. (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Image: Simon from Candiani explaining the denim production process on-site. (credits: Hugo Henri Guthan, Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

At the Candiani Mills we revised the samples we had sent out to be made – based on our technical packs. We got to meet the factory workers that had made our jeans samples and experience hands-on what it’s like to collaborate with a factory – interesting! We also got a facility tour from Simon and we got to see the actual denim production process, from raw cotton till a finished pair of jeans.

 

Image: Discussing our designs at Candiani (Image credits: Eva van Stekelenburg)

Image: Discussing our designs at Candiani (Image credits: Eva van Stekelenburg)

Next stop was the world’s biggest trim supplier ‘Prym’, located in a beautiful valley two hours from Milano. Here we got a guided tour of the whole facility in English-Italian. Amongst all the buzzing machines and mechanical devices (making a tremendous amount of noise) we found buttons in production for Louis Vuitton, Won Hundred, Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein. Once again we realized there is so much still to learn when it comes to the production of clothes!

 

During our trip we also visited chemical company Nearchimica. Fellow Denim Minor student Jade van Straalen (3rd year Fashion & Management ) also visited the factory: “In the early morning on Wednesday we went to Legnano to the Nearchimica Spa factory. We had a great presentation about their sustainable processes and dyestuffs. I really appreciated they admitted to areas where they could still improve as they feel they are still using too much water and chemicals with which they can never be completely sustainable. Personally, I am still convinced ‘sustainability’ is often used as a marketing tool and you never know how sustainable a factory really is. By changing a little small thing you can already say that it is ‘sustainable’. So it’s hard so say, when is something really sustainable?”
 
“At Nearchimica we also had a tour of all the different machines. The only downside to machines is that there are so many interesting things happening inside the machine it’s a pity you can only look at the outside.” One example of where we all would like to see what is happening inside is in a Jeans-Baking-Oven-Box machine. With stretch being used more often in jeans, most of us thought stretch was determined by the weave of the fabric. To our surprise there was another method:  a chemist at Nearchimica informed us that there are ‘oven’ machines that can determine the amount of stretch in a material – its elasticity – depending on how long the fabric is baked. The longer the fabric is ‘baked’, the less stretch it contains.
 

Image credits: Hugo Henri Guthan (Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Image credits: Hugo Henri Guthan (Estonian exchange student from Danish TEKO)

Over the duration of these four days in Italy, we visited countless factories that produced all elements that make up a deceivingly ‘simple’ pair of jeans. We learned that in reality, jeans are all but simple!

We already knew that for one pair of jeans an average of 6000 liters of water is needed, but actually seeing the whole production process is quite something different than just reading about it. It was also interesting to see how all the firms are working on making the production process more sustainable and I realised that as a Branding student I can add to that in the future. For instance by informing consumers they can participate in making fashion more sustainable by educating them about how to take care of clothes!

 

The post Denim students take on Italy! appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Clash show part 2- Marni en Versace http://amfi.nl/clash-show-part-2-marni-en-versace/ Fri, 23 Dec 2016 09:02:46 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16994  Stephanie Barbian 2nd Year Fashion & Management student The 2nd year Fashion & Design student’s aim was to find the balance between their assigned luxury brand and the sportswear brand […]

The post Clash show part 2- Marni en Versace appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

 Stephanie Barbian 2nd Year Fashion & Management student

The 2nd year Fashion & Design student’s aim was to find the balance between their assigned luxury brand and the sportswear brand Nike, which would result in a perfect “Clash”.
 
The student’s latest project was called Studio, in which design students are positioned as commercial designers within the four brands Gucci, Balenciaga, Marni and Versace. After researching, building concepts and designing collections, Clash brands uniting both the values of the mother brand and the values of the sportswear brand Nike were established. The outcomes were shown to the students, teachers and public on the annual Clash Show at Kohnstammhuis.
 
Eight Fashion & Design Students were selected to share their ideas behind the concept and the design.
 
Kateryna Boiko – Marni men
“My group and I worked according to a self-created trend forecast. We chose the 90s, which perfectly combines the balance of serious but also playful designs. The collection is a lot about Marni connected with Nike’s street feel. We were not thinking about economical shapes or innovative materials, the feel counted the most for us. All my garments have a ¾ length aiming to give the wearer the possibility to wear them any time. Our approach on sustainability was the inspiration of using production leftovers from the original brands resulting in trading and reusing fabrics within my Clash group.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

Kim van den Brule – Marni women – denim
“I used the high-fashion way of constructing pattern. I made a bodysuit of denim, which was really challenging since a bodysuit always needs to fit well and my selection of fabric is special in that case. What is really cool about Marni, is the timelessness. While researching the collections, body silhouettes and exciting prints were always present, however everything can be mixed with each other. My group and I took over these values for our Clash brand and combined it with comfort and innovation; Nike’s brand values. The result of this is high fashion with a streetwear feel. As an addition to my designs, I created sunglasses and jewellery made out of PVC by using the laser cut. What I find interesting about the laser cut is that I was able to create my accessories without any waste.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

Maud Op’t Land – Marni women
“What I especially like about this project is the combination of the heritage of a luxury brand with a sportswear brand, which is known by everybody. For me it was most important to look at the mother brand Marni, I wanted to create something special but still wearable matching the Nike perspective. Marni stands for a recognizable colour combination and exaggerated elements. My outfit includes really long sleeves and a silhouette inspired by Marni. Next to that, the inspiration of Marni is also noticeable in the usage of polka dots, which in my case are three-dimensional pompoms placed all over my pants. Nike is about multifunctionality and comfort; in my outfit the jacket is reversible and my pockets are detachable, which gives the wearer more options to wear the outfit.”

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

Wannes Akop – Versace men
“The Clash project really fits to the Zeitgeist of fashion right now. A lot of brands start with this trend; it is all about mixing high end with high street. For me, the combination Versace and Nike was achieved throughout finishing. If I think about Versace, I picture shine and glamour, which is not really up to my alley but by applying foil which melts on fabrics a shiny texture was created. What I link with Nike is the need of being visible when doing sports, reflective band is attached to my design as a detail reminding of Nike. The detachability of a garment plays a huge role in my collection. My bomber jacket is originally attached to the pants through zippers, giving the wearer the total freedom to create any style he wants. For me, the idea of sustainability comes down to multipurpose and detachability.”

 

Photo by RvHfoto

Photo by RvHfoto

The post Clash show part 2- Marni en Versace appeared first on AMFI.

]]>