AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Mon, 05 Dec 2016 10:13:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Style Research Interview http://amfi.nl/style-research-interview/ Mon, 05 Dec 2016 10:13:08 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16847   Fashion & Branding student Ella Possek interviews Fashion & Design student Floortje Mantel about her Style Research project.   What was the project about?   Style Research is about […]

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Fashion & Branding student Ella Possek interviews Fashion & Design student Floortje Mantel about her Style Research project.

Floortje Mantel

Floortje Mantel

 

What was the project about?

 

Style Research is about investigating a neighborhood in Amsterdam, in our case Eastern Docklands, by observing tribes and styles, both historical and contemporary. Eventually, as a group, we had to come up with a new style and concept.

 

Why is this project important for fashion studies?

 

As a fashion students you constantly have to come up with new ideas and new styles, instead of copying elements which you have already seen. It is about clashing the unexpected, and I believe that in this way, one can come up with great new inspiring concepts.

 

What are you most proud of?

 

Well, I think it is about me coming up with styles that I have never expected. I was able to look further than what I thought to be my style, and I believe that this is something to truly be proud of.

Floortje's research

Floortje’s research

What have you learned about yourself?

 

I found out that I like things that people might consider as ugly. I really like the way it comes together in this spread for example, the structuralism which is being disrupted. It gives me the feeling that something is not right, it is disturbing.

 

What came as an obstacle and how did you overcome it?

 

I had no idea of how to use Indesign or Photoshop, which I have overcome by watching tutorials on Youtube and on lynda.com. But the best way to learn is by just trying and figuring it out by yourself! Just make mistakes! Eventually you learn from these.

 

What knowledge or which new skill have you gained?

 

Indesign and photoshop obviously! But also connecting things that usually would not connect. This can be done only by looking into the meanings behind the elements of a certain style, picking the important ones, and from there thinking of a way to use these differently.

 

What tip would you give to a future student?

 

Just go for it. Don’t think too much, don’t question yourself. Just stick your thoughts in. Make mistakes, create weird analyzes! Just start working instead of being afraid to actually experiment.

 

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Under the Tuscan Sun http://amfi.nl/under-the-tuscan-sun/ Thu, 01 Dec 2016 15:25:41 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16836 Italy Trip 2nd Year Fashion & Management Article by Stephanie Barbian 2nd year Fashion & Management   Yesterday: the rainy Netherlands. Today: walking underneath the Tuscan sun! The second year […]

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Italy Trip 2nd Year Fashion & Management

Article by Stephanie Barbian 2nd year Fashion & Management

 

Yesterday: the rainy Netherlands. Today: walking underneath the Tuscan sun! The second year Fashion & Management students started their five-day trip to Bella Italia. The purpose was to learn more about four different Italian fabric factories and to get inspired by beautiful Florence.

 

The first stop was at Tonello, an Italian company specialised at garment finishing technologies.  The company’s focus lies on denim. The company organised a tour that started with a presentation introducing their way of working and thinking. By using the newest technologies, the company is able to finish each piece of denim in the most sustainable way. Tonello introduced NoStone, a new denim-washing system developed by the company in collaboration with Levi Strauss & co. The system is based on a stainless-steel abrasive drum, which is fastened to the washing-machine cylinder using the mechanical rather than the chemical nature of the washing process. Therefore, the NoStone process reduces water consumption, emission, production costs and processing time. The next destination was the almost 130 years old company Berto located in Bovolenta, a small town in the province of Padova. Berto is specialised on manufacturing fabrics entirely in Italy, making sure that craftsmanship, innovation and quality are on the top of the company’s philosophy.

 

Up next were visits to the companies Gruppo Il Colle and Beste, both located in Prato. The first is specialised in fibre dying for textiles, including stable, top and yarn dying. Gruppo Il Colle is aiming to achieve the highest quality possible by combining tradition and innovation. The in 1992 established company Gruppo Beste, gave us an insight in their textile designing, dyeing and finishing processes. The company especially caught our attention and interest, when showing us the fabrics they provide to high-end brands like Burberry.

 

Berto

Berto

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Berto 

 

Luckily we had a whole day to discover Florence. We started off with visits to museums of locally based brands. The Gucci museum shows the high-end’s brand trade mark bags, from the brand’s birth until the present, as well as the most stunning garments customised for special events. The Salvatore Ferragamo museum guided us from the starting point of the brand to the most famous pieces of designers like Issey Miyake’s Plastic Body, Hussain Chalaya`s Coffee Table Skirt and Christopher Makos’ Altered Image. Rather impressive!

 

Gucci museum

Gucci museum

Gucci museum

Gucci museum

 

Architectural styles like Renaissance and Gothic in combination with the charming Italian houses create a vibe that impressed us all while exploring the streets of Florence. The city sparkles full of history, seen in architectural masterpieces as the Palazzo Pitti, el Duomo, Santa Maria Novella. All the stores focus on Italian craftsmanship. It is generally known that the quality of Italian leather ware and Italian fabrics is the highest, but to be able to spy into small ateliers and shops made us understand and appreciate the value of Italian made goods even more.

At our last night we had to say goodbye to the city, which is only lightened up by streetlights in the dark. Florence won our affections and it is most likely that some of my fellow students will find their way back to the city after their study at AMFI.

 

el-duomo

Duomo

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Fashion & Visual Culture: more than just a pretty picture http://amfi.nl/fashion-visual-culture-just-pretty-picture/ Wed, 30 Nov 2016 11:13:06 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16817 By Laura Meijnen, 4rd year AMFI Fashion & Visual Culture student   In less than a week, the ByAMFI store will exhibit the work of 35 AMFI minor Fashion & […]

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By Laura Meijnen, 4rd year AMFI Fashion & Visual Culture student

 

In less than a week, the ByAMFI store will exhibit the work of 35 AMFI minor Fashion & Visual Culture students. The minor is a program for third and fourth year students who create meaningful fashion photography and film. After the first ten weeks in which we focused on photography, I met up with fellow Fashion & Branding students Gail van der Hoeven and Joep Maasdam to discuss their creative process and to reflect on their experience as image-makers. What can we expect to see of them in the exhibition?

The work Gail presented at the end of the photography period. the-work-gail-presented-at-the-end-of-the-photography-period

It has been ten weeks since we started this minor: how would you describe your experience so far?

Gail: “It has been great so far! After finishing the minor Fashion & Editorial Branding in which we launched a magazine with a group of 38 people, it feels amazing to work by myself again as it allows me to develop my own style in styling, photography and storytelling

Joep: “Same for me! I am enjoying every minute of it: ever since I started AMFI, this minor is something I always aimed to do. The program is quite intense and therefore demands a lot of perseverance, but it has led to results that make me super proud. My goal for this minor was to find a deeper meaning within images, and until now that has worked out really well. The classes push me to further develop my skills, resulting in my personal style becoming clearer every day. I start to understand what personally attracts me to an image, and how I can convey that in imagery myself.”

 

Up until now, what has been your biggest surprise?

Joep: “It’s way more pleasant than I thought it would be! However, it is still a lot of work and this minor asks for focus and time. You are constantly on the hunt for inspiration and create new imagery and meaning from the research you’ve done on a daily basis.”

Gail: “I think the main thing that surprised me, is the amount of time I spend on my process book. The process book makes up 50% of our grades and is therefore very important, however, I make a lot of ‘gut-feeling’ decisions, which are not as easy to explain for others to understand.”

 

The minor visual culture is divided into two parts: one that focuses on photography and one that focuses on film. For the first part, you picked a designer that inspired you to create meaningful images: can you briefly explain how this worked for you?

Joep: “Yes, and I am glad we had too! It took some time to find the right designer. I found a lot of upcoming innovative designers that matched my personal style, but most of them weren’t surprising enough to me. My final pick – upcoming label Namilia – had just done their first show in NY, and their message was so strong, both politically and socially, that it sparkled my imagination from the very first moment. I don’t just want to make aesthetically pleasing images – for me this minor really is about conveying a meaning. ”

Gail: “My designer is very well known as I picked Alexander McQueen. After hours of intense researching, I simply wrote down all of my associations and started collection objects that matched with them or started making them myself. Turns out that my mom and dad’s collections of uncommon items such as fossils, were more useful than I ever expected.”

Joep: “It is true that the best thing to do is just to follow your intuition. Sometimes I just hop on my bike and see where it brings me. It is the experiment that will lead you to the most inspiring ideas.

 

Gail and her model looking for the right angle in the right location

Gail and her model looking for the right angle in the right location

foto-artikel-vc2

 

Speaking of intuition, what is the weirdest thing you’ve done so far, just for the sake of making a great image?

Joep: “Ha, I’ve done some crazy things over the past few weeks. I put dildos and jockstraps in the house of an elderly lady, put someone in a bright red latex suit… Oh, and I had a plus size model pose for me naked on top of a lawn mower. When people react shocked, it tells me I’ve created something they have never seen before. Honestly I can’t wait to see what kind of weird things I will do in the final weeks of this period…”

Gail: “I’ve certainly learnt how to do things that I’ve never done before and that might feel awkward. For instance, I had some guys I didn’t know put a couch upside down in the middle of an HvA building. And I had my sister eat flowers.. It’s all for the sake of experimenting, and when it doesn’t work, it does feel comforting to know that only the people who look over my process book will see it.”

Photo made by Joep seems at a first glance  a typical fashion photo, but then you start wondering where we are and what happened to the model . Joep’s model looking pretty confident in a latex suit and a diving mask.

Curious to see what else Joep and Gail will come up with? Stay updated about their work, and that of 33 other Visual Culture students by following the official Fashion & Visual Culture Instagram (instagram.com/amfifashionandvisualculture), the minor’s Vimeo page (https://vimeo.com/amfifashionfilms) and make sure not to miss the exhibition at the ByAMFI Store (Spui 23, Amsterdam), opening on the 1st of December 2016. See you there!

 

Event on Facebook.

 

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A suitcase full of memories: my internship abroad http://amfi.nl/suitcase-full-memories-internship-abroad/ Fri, 11 Nov 2016 09:20:39 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16776 To me, doing an internship always seemed like something that would happen in the far future. Nevertheless, same as doing my intake for AMFI, getting accepted and moving to Amsterdam […]

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To me, doing an internship always seemed like something that would happen in the far future. Nevertheless, same as doing my intake for AMFI, getting accepted and moving to Amsterdam — it becomes reality before you know it.

Article written by Sanne Nooitgedagt.

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La Barceloneta in autumn

 

It’s November, yet my feet are touching the sand and the sun is lighting up my skin. I’m 100% relaxed, but also a bit scared when the realisation of time passing by hits me. It was only a few months ago that I was biking through Amsterdam when I read the email that METAL Magazine in Barcelona could use me as their editorial/web intern. METAL is an independent publishing project that offers a mix of fashion, photography and art – always with a focus on exploring something new that will inspire their readers. The excitement to go to Barcelona and the expectation of the options that this diverse magazine could offer me were big. Little did I know that reality turns out to be better than I could have ever imagined…

I turned 21 on the 16th of September and had never expected to have such a happy birthday in a new city, surrounded by a very nice group of people.

I turned 21 on the 16th of September and had never expected to have such a happy birthday in a new city, surrounded by a very nice group of people.

We all know cliché stories of the intern getting coffee and doing leftover tasks. Luckily, from my experience, this is not the case at all. My tasks mainly consist out of writing for metalmagazine.eu. I do interviews with inspiring creative people and I write about exhibitions, fashion campaigns and fashion shows. I didn’t think I would get this responsibility so soon, but on the second day, my first post already got published!

Artist Luna Paiva being photographed by Osma Harvilahti in front of her window display. The secret location where we got served amazing food, presented by food crafter Pepi de Boissieu.

And ever since, I have been given great opportunities to expand my portfolio and to grow professionally as well as personally in this creative industry. In my second week, I went to the opening of Hermes’ new window display in Barcelona. For this assignment I did not only interview the artist that created it, but I also attended a cocktail party on a secret location afterwards, which enabled me to meet other interesting people. And some weeks ago I was at the launch party of the GucciGhost collection, during which I had a very inspiring interview with Trouble Andrew. It is amazing to be trusted to represent the magazine in a professional surrounding like that and to be able to learn the difference between a real-life and an email-interview.

Collection presentation of Gucci Ghost. Did anyone say free drinks?!

There are a few main things I have learned from my internship so far: be patient, you need to get to know the company and the company needs to get to know you — even though I already got responsibilities, there were also many days in the first weeks where I didn’t have that much to do, which gave me a bad feeling. Don’t be afraid to ask for feedback, I know this is what everyone says, but it’s true — at first I didn’t get any feedback, but my posts still got published. I was curious to know what they thought of my work, so I decided to ask for feedback and the answers have really helped me in my development and to gain confidence. Also don’t be afraid to ask for more challenges, you are there to learn and it’s your time to try and get a little taste of as many things as possible.

 

For me personally, being patient is the best advice to get. It takes some time to settle down in a new city, but I believe that when you show motivation and work ethic, good things come back to you. I know that life at AMFI sometimes can be a pain in the ass, but I can now say from experience that this study really prepares you for ‘the real world’. And, in my eyes, this ‘real world’ is actually pretty exciting. I work hard, but still have enough time to enjoy and explore an amazing city with new friends.

Visiting the monthly Palo Alto Market, a creative market that mixes street-food with authentic design. Drinking mojitos at Rosa Negra, one of my favourite places in Barcelona. Celebrating Halloween at my friends their flat with a delicious pumpkin dinner. Enjoying a long weekend being reunited with fellow AMFI-student and friend Natali Finke.

In the 2 months that I have been working for METAL, I really feel that I’ve become part of the brand and this is seen in the tasks I get assigned — I gained enough trust to be asked to go to Fashion Week in Tbilisi (Georgia) to replace the initial editor of METAL who couldn’t go, and to write about the designers for the website! Unfortunately it turned out to be too last minute to change the name + departure place of the ticket, so I couldn’t go. However, the fact that I am trusted to do this is promising very exciting opportunities for the next 3 months.

There’s this thing about Spanish floors… Exploring a different Spanish city whilst visiting my sister, who is living as an au pair in Pamplona for a year.

The Spanish culture taught me to live more in the moment and to do what everyone always says you should: enjoy! Your internship is a time that allows you to experiment, make mistakes, but above all, to create great memories. A big smile appears on my face when I look back on the progress I have made these first two months, but this smile gets even bigger if I think about the exciting opportunities ahead of me and the memories that are to be made over the coming 3 months, professionally as well as personally.

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Towards a Zero Waste Industry http://amfi.nl/towards-zero-waste-industry/ Fri, 28 Oct 2016 13:47:43 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16757 Beyond Green is the annual symposium on the future of fashion organised by the Amsterdam Fashion Institute (AMFI) and since two years together with Circle Economy. It uses the collective power of students […]

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Beyond Green is the annual symposium on the future of fashion organised by the Amsterdam Fashion Institute (AMFI) and since two years together with Circle Economy. It uses the collective power of students and industry players to tackle critical issues throughout the fashion system. New and established minds come together and push the boundaries of what we know, and realise what we dare to imagine.

 

Since 2005 AMFI has hosted Beyond Green, for students and teachers to discuss the latest issues in sustainability with specific regard to how the fashion industry operates. Speakers with diverse fields of expertise from across the world continue to challenge us to adapt to changes we all are facing.

 

The theme of today’s event was ‘Towards a Zero Waste Industry’ (a topic already discussed in 2009 that then went by the name “Zero Waste Fashion’). Pioneering brands and innovators, as well as promising students, debated the latest developments in the field of circular fashion, from game-changing material recovery technologies to innovative closed-loop business models,  what does a zero waste fashion industry look like?

 

The day started with an opening by AMFI director Souraya Bouwmans-Sarraf and Circle-Economy CEO Andy Ridley. Souraya emphasis on how students are the future, and that by changing the curriculum the green treat for the future is created. The first talk of the morning was held by Gwen Cunningham, who works for AMFI as well as Circle-Economy. “Waste is a form of a failed relationship between a product and consumer. We should redesign this relationship. ” Gwen says. She also pointed out that we use resources more then we can replenish them. If we would, we would need 3 earths.

 

Next up was Isaac Nichelson (Chief of Sustainability Recover), who said that the first step to a circular path is mechanical textile recycling. According to him there is a need for more industry collaboration. Collective focus, clear goals and global initiatives, instead of just saying things have to change. Isaac was followed up by Cyndi Rhoades, founder & CEO of Worn Again. She told about how her company stepped away from upcycling. This method turned out not to solve waste. The method only extended the lifecycle of a product, while the production cost more than creating a new product. She now emphasis on the need of working with blends and the influence the government can have, by giving tax breaks to companies that work towards sustainability. The closing speech was giving by dr. Kate Goldsworthy. Kate is doing research in the area of textiles and has a main focus on materials. “Materials can neither be created nor destroyed, only transformed.” She talked about how products are fleeting and materials last forever. According to her we therefore have to make clothes last longer.

 

After the break AMFI alumni Tamara Koch and Zil Vostalova gave a presentation about virtual prototyping. Not only is this a visually more attractive design process, the designer can also work more accurate, more cost effective, more in charge of the process and last but not least, there is no waste. Tamara and Zil were followed by Jessie Kroon, founder of A New Zero. Jessie gave examples on how you can incorporate a more sustainable way of living into your own live. Like bringing your own bag to the grocery store, not use plastic bottles anymore, etc. The morning was closed by Travis, a fourth year AMFI student who gave a speech full of humour about ‘Hello Goodbuy”. This new online community wants to “forge a new path to being true conscious consumers.” They came up with the “Closet Mass Index”, making you question your own wardrobe. Hello Goodbuy proves that you can transmit a serious message by at the same time making people laugh.

 

In the afternoon expert-led workshops on company-specific challenges took place for the next generation of motivated fashion professionals and seasoned industry pros. The next steps will be taken in uncovering and designing new, innovative solutions to the age-old challenge of waste and the future of fashion.

 

Article written by Carly Hubregtse

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Pushing your limits – the AMFI Honours programme http://amfi.nl/pushing-limits-amfi-honours-programme/ Wed, 28 Sep 2016 09:32:35 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16720 The Honours programme offers a selected group of talented Fashion & Design students the opportunity to spend a short but intensive period deepening and strengthening their fashion vision, stylistic signature […]

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The Honours programme offers a selected group of talented Fashion & Design students the opportunity to spend a short but intensive period deepening and strengthening their fashion vision, stylistic signature and personal motivation. The end result is a small high quality collection of three outfits, which are shown during a catwalk show.  Last Summer was the 12th edition of the AMFI Honours programme. Twelve students were coached by Frans Ankoné, Martine Heinen , Saskia Stockler, Sjoukje Bierma and Peter Leferink. The catwalk show took place on August 29th in Undercurrent.

Honours programme students go through their own growth process. “During the programme I got the chance to experiment and develop my own handwriting. You learn more about your strengths and weaknesses and continuously challenge yourself, so in the end you can alter your weaknesses into strengths” says Design student Charlotte Bakkenes.

Collection Charlotte Bakkenes- photo by Team Peter Stigter

Collection Charlotte Bakkenes- photo by Team Peter Stigter

Students receive coaching from specialists in the fashion industry who help them research the ‘Zeitgeist’, fashion and its history, define a research question, set aims and design a variety of solutions; to name only a few parts of the content. What Charlotte found most special about the programme was working together with Bakri Shoukeh, a successful pleating specialist from Syria who came to Holland two years ago. “During the course we got offered inspirational lectures and workshops, among one of Bakri. After the workshop I immediately contacted him and I ended up working with him closely for several weeks to realise a pleated train. He showed me how he made paper patterns by hand and then pleat the fabrics in between, a method that is still executed in Paris by Dior and Chanel. It was incredibly inspirational to see someone being so dedicated and full of love for his profession. “

Pleated train dress created with old pleating technique- photo by Team Peter Stigter

Pleated train dress created with old pleating technique- photo by Team Peter Stigter

During the programme students visit multiple exhibitions and also travel to Paris. “I thought Paris was amazing. You see and you learn about  ‘real’ fashion. Watching the shows gives you a lot of inspiration – as well as looking at the crowds. Besides learning a lot I also had a lot of fun because of the way we sneaked into the shows. The whole trip was a huge motivation to work really hard on my own collection afterwards.

Asking Charlotte if the programme is what she expected and hoped it would be, she answered: “Time has flown by. I expected a heavy-duty course and had my doubts about giving up my summer holiday, but I don’t regret a single minute of it! The Honours programme was a chance to see how far I can push my limits and make ultimate use of what I was offered. I learned so much!

Charlotte's designs in the final editorial fashion story , photographed by Joris van der Ploeg

Text by Carly Hubregtse.

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Kick-off Master Fashion Enterprise Creation http://amfi.nl/kick-off-master-fashion-enterprise-creation/ Tue, 06 Sep 2016 10:43:48 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16685 From Brazil to Korea and from India to Italy: the first students of the new Master Fashion Enterprise Creation, come from all over the world. Geleyn Meijer (dean FDMCI) welcomed […]

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From Brazil to Korea and from India to Italy: the first students of the new Master Fashion Enterprise Creation, come from all over the world. Geleyn Meijer (dean FDMCI) welcomed the aspiring entrepreneurs to the University of Applied Sciences last Monday, September the 5th: “It’s a fantastic step you made, and we are proud to have you here”.

Last Friday the students already met each other, the staff, AMFI and the AUAS. In the next two years they will work on their business plan and its implementation the two coming years. Their workplace is “StudioHvA”, a creative hub that offers plenty of room for knowledge sharing and interaction. Interesting detail: the Fashion Enterprise Creation students are the first fulltime master students of the HvA.

The business plans range from nano-technology integrated into fabrics and materials, to the use of artists and performers in the development of collections. During the Master there will be collaborations with real companies and sponsors. The ultimate goal is to establish innovative and profitable businesses.

The students already have clear visions regarding their business plan: An Italian student sees opportunities in innovative fashion, accessible and fitted for every occasion: “I want to make something different but something wearable”.

Apart from their nationality their backgrounds are quite diverse as well: only a few have completed a Bachelor’s degree in the fashion industry. Studies vary from business, communication, marketing and physics to chemistry. With this mix of backgrounds and nationalities there is no doubt that unique projects will originate.

Article written by Floor Bregman.

studio_hva_01 Foto5sept3 Foto 5sept

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From Dries van Noten to Derrida: AMFI’s Fashion Theories minor http://amfi.nl/from-dries-van-noten-to-derrida-amfis-fashion-theories-minor/ Wed, 24 Aug 2016 10:12:12 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16610 Ask any student what a day at AMFI entails and most of the answers you get are going to be something like ‘updating my process book’, ‘researching sustainable clothing factories […]

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Ask any student what a day at AMFI entails and most of the answers you get are going to be something like ‘updating my process book’, ‘researching sustainable clothing factories in China’ or ‘toiling away for every single waking moment in the sewing room, until I can’t tell what’s fabric and what are my own tired fingers’.

Answers you might not expect to hear include ‘investigating Judith Butler’s theory of gender performativity‘ or ‘discussing the power balances in today’s digital data economy in relation to Foucault’s theory of neoliberal politics.’

These are real answers though, from students at AMFI taking part in the Fashion Theories minor. Closer to a university BA course, Fashion Theories teaches students to analyse the fashion industry in an academic manner.

The minor is split into three parts: the body, (popular) culture, and marketing. Students examine theories from Deleuze to Kotler, Bourdieu to Baudrillard and a whole lot in between, each constructing three academic papers on topics such as #instagay, Kim K, or Dutch football fans, to name only a few of the range of topics explored.

This can seem like a lot to process, particularly for those more accustomed to analysing garment patterns rather than academic papers. However, those who do take part in the minor are often surprised by how much the intricacies can be applied to a further understanding of everyday life and of the fashion industry. I asked a few Fashion Theories students what they considered the most valuable thing they learnt in the last semester and how it will help them as they continue their life at AMFI or in the big bad world.
 
 
Domenique van den Broek - Reinwardt Academie

How a lot of different theories that mostly have nothing to do with fashion, can still relate back to that world. I’ve acquired a totally different perception of the world (and then tried to bring all it back to fashion… a hard job to do, but in the end quite rewarding).

Dominique van den Broek
3rd year, Cultural Heritage at Reinwardt Academie

 

That basically everything around us in society, e.g. gender, is socially constructed. This was quite a shocking realisation but also very exciting, because this means anything can be changed as well – in order to attack power inequalities and to construct ideas that create a more balanced and equal environment.

Florentina van Stapele
4th Year, International Fashion & Branding at AMFI

 

Sophie Bakker - Fashion & Management

I have learned that fashion is maybe the most encompassing subject in our world and that you can relate almost all things to it. Deleuze’s theories really inspired me to take the chance and think differently about things happening in the world.

Sophie Bakker
3rd Year, Fashion & Management at AMFI

 

Personally, I was shocked with the fact that Europe (or Western culture) has such a strong voice in comparison to the rest of the world. We ignore certain cultures and take over their beauty ideals, for example. Fashion Theories has pushed me into different directions, even challenging opinions I thought I was quite sure of.

Katrien Fabry
alumna 2016 International Fashion & Branding at AMFI

 

Merel Blom - Willem de Kooning AcademyThere is no right or wrong in philosophy. And I learned to question everything. Seriously, EVERYTHING.

Merel Blom
4th Year, Lifestyle & Design at Willem de Kooning Academy

 

 

 

For me, one of the most valuable aspects of Fashion Theories is that it allows students to consider the fashion industry from new angles, as well as to take a step back and consider the field as a whole. We ask why often, and in the process, open new doors to discover and create, and to diversify our points of view.

Article by fourth-year International Fashion & Branding student Clemency Newman. 

Read more about the course description on Kiesopmaat.nl

 

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AMFI Transit 2016 Graduation Event Photos http://amfi.nl/amfi-transit-2016-graduation-event-photos/ Wed, 17 Aug 2016 11:58:44 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16523 The annual graduation event AMFI Transit took place on 1 July 2016 in Amsterdam’s World Fashion Centre. Together with family, friends, our faculty and professionals from the industry we were both inspired and feeling sentimental. […]

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The annual graduation event AMFI Transit took place on 1 July 2016 in Amsterdam’s World Fashion Centre. Together with family, friends, our faculty and professionals from the industry we were both inspired and feeling sentimental. Together we celebrated the accomplishments and successes of our students over their years of hard work.

Here is the first selection of photos highlighting various moments from the event, exposition and diploma ceremony in Amsterdam’s World Fashion Centre. More photos will follow coming weeks. Photos by Joris van Egmond.

We welcomed the families and friends of our graduates. Pictured: Fashion & Branding graduate Rochelle Bambury. Austrian student Roman Hoering graduates from Fashion & Design, pictured with lecturer Martin Coppes. Work from Vera van Horik and Eva-Luna Schulte featured on picture panels in the expo hall. Fashion & Branding student Sammy Moonen's scent branding concept featured on a picture panel. Vanessa Chan and Siko van Berkel (House of Orange agency) on hair and makeup, photo features C. Graves wearing Fashion & Design graduate Elly Pan's 'Double Happiness' collection. Fashion & Design graduate Judith Janssen featured her collection in an installation. Designer Marcella Lobo joined others whose collections were featured in a guerrilla-style fashion show. The Italian Fashion & Design graduate Monia Antinori''s collection being modeled during the exposition. Marlou Breuls' and her collection was nominated for Lichting, the national fashion design graduate competition. F&D graduate Danial Aitouganov's collection presented during the exposition. The annual photography exhibition featured duo's of our alumni. Alumnus Amber Slooten featured her graduation project on virtual fashion in a special installation. Fashion & Design graduate Laura van der Woerdt featured on a model as our design lecturers Philipp Schueller and Oscar Raaijmakers observe. Fashion & Branding graduate Romy Bresseleers awaiting the last fellow alumnus at the cocktail bar. Fashion & Design graduate Danial Aitouganov was also nominated for Lichting 2016. What is Fashion Question Wall and Guestbook - AMFI Transit 2016

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They Said I Can Be Anything http://amfi.nl/they-said-i-can-be-anything-christiaan-devries/ Tue, 21 Jun 2016 15:26:27 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=16434 Design sometimes has the most surprising sources of inspiration. This article follows the personal journey of Christiaan de Vries’ graduation project from pink to war, and from war to self-expression.  Most […]

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Design sometimes has the most surprising sources of inspiration. This article follows the personal journey of Christiaan de Vries’ graduation project from pink to war, and from war to self-expression. 

Most of us have been raised surrounded by stereotypes, these being subliminally drilled into our minds since we could see or speak. In today’s postmodern world one would assume that it’s about time to let go. In an attempt to change how we propagate stereotypes, Christiaan was first inspired by Sapeurs. These dandy-like men from the Congo are proud representatives of the colour pink. This made him dig deeper into a culture where color appropriation seemed to have taken a different turn. Context emerged as a critical aspect of the use of colour, since seeing a man dressed in fluorescent magenta in Amsterdam might certainly not arouse the same feeling as it does elsewhere.

“The boy who likes pink gets bullied. This is how heteronormative our society (still) is. When really, you can be anything. Yet, you continue to try to meet expectations of others. Live up to gender-roles and follow social rules. Where this leaves us: sure, you can be anything, as long as you fit in.”

Sapeurs - Congo

The dandy-like Sapeurs don pink in the Congo.

Soon after this discovery, Christiaan stumbled across the photo series of conceptual photographer Richard Mosse. His images capture the beauty and tragedy of war and destruction. It is certain that “war” would have never been the first association to a color “so feminine” as pink. Yet the artist still found a way to make a connection between colour and armed conflict.

Richard Mosse - pink and war

Images by Richard Mosse ‘The Enclave’ (2012).

Diving into war-related inspiration, Christiaan was fascinated by the concept of dazzle camouflage, a technique where ships are painted in dazzling patterns in order to confuse their enemies. The optical illusion these prints provided formed the basis for Christiaan’s graduation collection. Imagine a traditional menswear collection, deformed and totally deconstructed by the attributes of Dazzle Camouflage.

An excerpt from Christiaan's process book researching dazzle camouflage.

An excerpt from Christiaan’s process book researching dazzle camouflage.

Looking back, making a jump from pink to war ran the risk of losing enthusiasm. Even though fashion is often serious, it was not the right direction for Christiaan’s work.

“I remembered seeing an old building in London, which I used to cross on my way to my internship. It was always very boring, grey, and dull, but the last time I visited, all of a sudden it had been painted in all these bright colours and playful patterns. It suddenly stood out from all the other buildings.”

Recalling memories with a tint of nostalgia might not work for everyone, but it did for Christiaan. This event triggered him to investigate the artist and the story behind the newly painted building. The Memphis Movement turned out to be the last piece to complete the puzzle. What struck Christiaan the most was how the aesthetics of this postmodern movement blurred the identities of objects. Something functioned as a lamp, but simply looking at its shape and colours, it could have been any object.

Memphis Movement Christiaan de Vries

An excerpt from Christiaan’s process book research on the Memphis movement.

memphis movement - Christiaan de Vries

An excerpt from the process book: colour studies and Memphis movement inspiration.

Everything comes back around  to the boy who was bullied for wearing pink. The collection drastically departs from the original perspective of this six-year-old boy who grew up believing that pink is for girls and blue for boys. Christiaan de Vries was able to create a menswear collection which was more than just a group of garments – the designs embody the story from pink to war, and from being stigmatised to finding the ultimate form of self-expression.

Christiaan de Vries - virtual prototyping menswear collection

Virtual prototyping for the menswear collection.

Illustration - Christiaan de Vries

Christiaan’s illustration of the collection line-up.

Christiaan de Vries - installation Kromhouthal

Christiaan’s installation at the Kromhouthal in January. Photo by Team Peter Stigter.

 

Christiaan de Vries - They Said I Could Be Anything

Christiaan de Vries

Christiaan de Vries

Collection photographer Sam Bynens. Models: Max Croes & Dennis Bijleveld from FIC Models; MUAH: Caroline Karte.

Article by second-year International Fashion & Branding student Laura Sinnhuber. 

Curious to find out more about Christiaan’s collection? Visit the Transit exposition at the World Fashion Centre on July 1 2016.

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