AMFI http://amfi.nl Amsterdam Fashion Institute Thu, 21 Jun 2018 16:13:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Prestigious Prizes for AMFI Alumni Lisi and Sarah http://amfi.nl/prestigious-prizes-amfi-alumni-lisi-sarah/ Wed, 09 May 2018 09:17:30 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19463 During the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography, not one, but two AMFI alumni were rewarded with a prestigious prize. The festival is, since the business for several designers […]

The post Prestigious Prizes for AMFI Alumni Lisi and Sarah appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

During the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography, not one, but two AMFI alumni were rewarded with a prestigious prize. The festival is, since the business for several designers attending became booming, one of those “must visits” for the fashion industry. Some even say that what the Cannes Film Festival is for the movie industry, Hyères is for those who can count themselves as the best of the best within the fashion fields.

 

The contest became even more important – for the Dutchies at least – when Victor & Rolf were praised for their collection and received an award. But Hyères is not only an important contest for all who want to make it in fashion, it’s also one of the oldest festivals where fashion is the main topic. The first edition took place in 1985 and ever since, the main goal of the Festival is to encourage young (and old!) creatives to show their unique vision on fashion and the world in general!

 

 

010_Sarah_Bruylant

 

This year, the prize of the City of Hyères, or better known as the Hyères audience award, went to “our own” Sarah Bruylant for her 19th century pointillist inspired collection with gracious, bright but big balloon-shaped dresses.

 

The Première Vision Grand Prize, went to designer duo BOTTER, or separately known as Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh. You might recognize the name Lisi Herrebrugh, because she also is an AMFI alumni. BOTTER’s menswear collection was inspired by the mutual heritage of Botter and Herrebrugh (Caribbean) and pointed out cultural and environmental issues poured into colorful designs with a good doses of humor. The collection was bright, innovative and styled to perfection. Please notice the nice addition of inflatable toys, fishnets and (S)hell logos for making a statement concerning climate change, global warming and other –most worrying- earth issues. Not only is this message actual and touching, the message is also very human and real. BOTTER receives, among many other prizes, 15,000 euros and is going to collaborate with Chanel’s Métiers d’Art division.

 

007_Rushemy_Botter

 

rushemy_botter_aca17_0125

The post Prestigious Prizes for AMFI Alumni Lisi and Sarah appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Hong Kong Diaries #1: Sarah Slingsby http://amfi.nl/hong-kong-diaries-1-sarah-slingsby/ Mon, 07 May 2018 18:43:15 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19456 In our Hong Kong diaries we’ll meet three Fashion & Management students during their specialisation semester in Hong Kong & China. Here, they’ll write about their time spent abroad, share […]

The post Hong Kong Diaries #1: Sarah Slingsby appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

In our Hong Kong diaries we’ll meet three Fashion & Management students during their specialisation semester in Hong Kong & China. Here, they’ll write about their time spent abroad, share some tips and knowledge about the Hong Kong culture and the specialisation itself. This week International Fashion & Management student Sarah Slingsby (21 years old) talks about her first month in Hong Kong.

 

Article by third year Fashion & Branding student An-Sofie Vandecruys.

 

Why did you choose for the specialisation ‘International Production’?

When I applied for AMFI I already saw the possibility of going to China within the flexible program, and I immediately thought of this as a great opportunity. I find Chinese culture and its art very inspiring, and visiting this country would give me so much life experience. However, I wasn’t sure at that time what I wanted to specialize in later, so I just kept it in the very back of my mind. When I realised during the second year that I wanted to focus on production, I thought this specialisation would be a once in a lifetime chance and an opportunity I should grab with both hands.

 

Management students in Hong Kong

The management students in Hong Kong.

 

What did you do in the first phase of the specialisation?

The specialisation starts off with three weeks of preparation at AMFI, including a one-week WRAP course, presentations on both a Chinese topic and the company you are placed at, and Chinese Mandarin lessons. After this there is one week of transfer to Hong Kong. Here you will start off with four weeks of Chinese language & culture classes at PolyU before starting at your company.

 

How is studying at the PolyU?

The campus is beautiful – however a bit confusing in the beginning – and has great facilities. Our teachers at the PolyU are master students who want to become Chinese Mandarin teachers for foreigners. It is great that while you learn a lot from them, they also learn a lot from you. Both from an educational point of view, as well as personally and culturally. The classes are quite serious in China; you can not be late, eat in class or lack participation. However, the teachers are incredibly nice and love to talk to you about their favourite restaurants in Hong Kong, their hometowns and where to go shopping.

 

meeting local people

Meeting the locals.

 

What do you do in class?

The classes are mainly from 09:30 – 12:20 and always start with reviewing the previous class, then learning new grammar and words and end with a drill (which means speaking the words over and over again until we pronounce them right). Once a week we have culture classes on food, music, drama and fashion. We also visit a museum twice. There is no homework, except reviewing previous and following classes, so there is enough free time to explore the city. There are three tests in total, which do require some studying, but the teachers prepare you very well, so there is absolutely no need to stress about this.

 

What are the main differences between AMFI and the PolyU?

The biggest difference for me is how the Chinese handle time. 5 minutes before the start of class we would have to start Whatsapping our classmates where they are and you would need a good reason to be late or miss class. Also, the classes always end right on the exact minute. We would repeat words until class is officially over, never too early. I would say that AMFI is more relaxed, informal and chaotic. I feel like the PolyU is very well structured.

 

How is Hong Kong?

I am enjoying myself immensely in this city! AMFI prepared us really well on the culture and how to behave in school and at work, which made the so-called “culture shock” easy. The city is mesmerizing and there is so much to see and do. I have been hiking in the mountains, visiting temples, tanning at the beach, going up in skyscrapers, experiencing nightlife and surrounding myself along thousands of (often slow walking) Hong Kongese people everyday. I had to get used to the massive amount of people around me all the time and the typical “Chinese smell” as we all call it here, which is hard to get used to. Walking along the food stands you will smell and see crazy things, like chicken feet and all kinds of (alive!) fishes you can choose to eat. Everyday I see crazy stuff, but I really love it, because it is such a different world here and I still can’t believe I get to experience it for myself. Overall, I found it quite easy to settle down in Hong Kong; transport is super easy and convenient, all signs are in English, most people also speak English and I never feel alone with all my AMFI peeps around me.

 

Crab

Plenty of alive seafood to choose from.

 

Why would you recommend people to do this specialisation?

Don’t do it because you want to learn the Chinese language; it is really, really difficult and hard to make progress in such a short amount of time. However, it is great to know the basics and be able to say some basic sentences to impress people. I think the Chinese lessons are great, because you get to learn from Chinese students who are around the same age as you, which makes the differences in culture very clear and super interesting. The most important part of this specialisation is yet to come though: working at a fashion company in Hong Kong or China and writing a research and advice report for them. I will be working at Perfect Moment, a luxury ski-, surf- and activewear brand, which has their production and sourcing office in Hong Kong. I will have four visits to factories in China and will be able to see the production process with my own eyes in the country where 80% of all clothing production takes place. It is a great opportunity if you would like to work in production, because China is a leading country in fashion production, and working here will teach you a lot about communicating and cooperating within such a different culture. When else will you get the luxury of someone (in this case AMFI, thanks Annet, Jan and Eva!) arranging a company in China for you where you will be able to gain work experience, do relevant research and make you see the inside of factories with your own eyes?! And all of this while exploring an amazing city together with 13 other AMFI students?! For me, the first month has already been a time of my life I will never forget.

 

If you want to know more, or have any questions; always feel free to contact me! – Sarah

The post Hong Kong Diaries #1: Sarah Slingsby appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Is the Fashion Industry Really That Competitive? http://amfi.nl/fashion-industry-really-competitive/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 17:42:07 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19433   The fashion industry is known as an extremely competitive industry. It has grown tremendously over the years; around 1980 a rough amount of 34 million people were employed, today […]

The post Is the Fashion Industry Really That Competitive? appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

 

The fashion industry is known as an extremely competitive industry. It has grown tremendously over the years; around 1980 a rough amount of 34 million people were employed, today it has increased to approximately 80 million. The size of fashion crowd eager to work in the business has grown as well, as the amount of fashion schools popping up world wide. This as a result of fast-fashion making the term ‘fashion’ accessible for everyone, but also had the industry face serious trouble and changed the definition of what we used to perceive as competition. I spoke to three professionals  about their insights, experiences and the future of competitiveness.

 

Article by second year International Fashion & Branding student Zoë Akihary.

 

Special thanks to Annemieke van Beek (Co-creative partner Mart Visser), Leslie Holden (Head department of Design/MAFEC) and Jo Watson (Coordinator Denim minor and Brands & Identity)

 

Although fast fashion isn’t exactly the oldest term, it certainly has had the greatest impact, causing fashion to become the second most polluting industry of the world. We currently live in the content generation in which social media has increased everyone’s appetite for fashion and newness. One single ‘refresh’ button exposes us to an overload of new information and products. From the temptation of over-consuming, big retailers such as Zara now release new products every two weeks, by doing so, the retailer builds a certain hype and excitement surrounding ‘popular’ items that seem likely to disappear. Fashion is easily and quickly copied nowadays. This change of pace in production and competition has brought problems such as damage to the environment, loss of value, fashion waste and unethical behaviour.

 

These problems change how we see competition to work of solving these industry problems together. This generation is much more open about sharing, sourcing and working together, because there is an increasing amount of willingness of improvement. It’s a different culture in which we’re more keen to share and give information instead of being competitive individually. New methods, such as pre-competitive collaboration, are introduced. This basically means brands collaborating together to source out the right and sustainable materials in order to improve the sustainable era of the industry. Brands slowly realise they won’t be able to improve the pollutive industry on their own to make a real difference. There is no point in everybody developing their own individual materials when it’s harmful for the environment. We should invest in good, sustainable -production and materials and share those with each other strategically.

 

The key is to keep the consumer always in mind even as, the brand, brings their own values to the fore. We should continue to design clothes that epitomise great design and use high-quality materials, but now do think twice before ignoring issues of environmental responsibility and ethical production standards. Consumer’s expectations of fashion are changing and so must the industry’s. Adapting will be a challenge, a daunting and overwhelming one, but the brand that puts his or her values first, and the bottom line second, will stand out from the crowd.

 

So to conclude the fashion industry has now moved to a new era of competitiveness, one in which this generation is taking responsibility for the problems that had been caused recently, and is much more transparent. There is more industry, more job opportunities, but also a broader group being eager to take part in this industry and therefore improving it. Getting noticed and finding a job is the same challenge as back in the day, it will always depend on your own strengths, ambition and preferences. The fashion industry is just as competitive on the job market just like any other industry.

 

The post Is the Fashion Industry Really That Competitive? appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Veganism meets fashion http://amfi.nl/veganism-meets-fashion/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 17:23:00 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19427 At AMFI, we often talk about our dreams and plans after graduating. Every student has some ideas for their own career. After our graduation all doors are open but it […]

The post Veganism meets fashion appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

At AMFI, we often talk about our dreams and plans after graduating. Every student has some ideas for their own career. After our graduation all doors are open but it takes time and patience to find the right place in the varied fashion industry. But where could we go to in the future? In the upcoming months, we will present a series about AMFI graduates who have left the school some years ago and who have successfully gained a foothold in the fashion industry.

 

Article by first year International Fashion & Branding student Janna Hämpke.

 

One of them is Dena Simaite. She studied Fashion and Management at AMFI and graduated in 2015. Dena enjoyed her time at AMFI although she still remembers the stressful life of a fashion student. But even though, she appreciated all the aspects AMFI taught her on a theoretical and practical level helping her to manage her own brand “Noumenon” today. Dena knows well how difficult the entrance into the fashion industry can appear as a fashion student but she is convinced that everybody will find their own place in the fashion industry as we all have our own unique gifts and talents.

 

Photo 1 (1)

Dena’s concept development of the previous collection.

 

While studying at AMFI, Dena wrote a fashion blog giving her the possibilities to have a look into the fashion industry, outside of AMFI,  and to get in contact with photographers and models. After her graduation she decided to create her own vegan brand called Noumenon, inspired by the Noumenal world of the German philosopher Kant. Veganism in fashion, a subject Dena has always been fascinated by, was also the topic of her graduation project. By combining ethics and aesthetics, Dena wants to create cruelty-free, durable, but contemporary fashion that is influenced by the 80s and 90s and underlines femininity in a softly elegant way.

 

In 2016 she finally launched her womenswear brand. In an elegant, white showroom near the Prinsengracht, she presents her collections with modern and minimalistic cuts in warm colours to her customers. With the help of two interns Dena manages her fashion brand everyday. She has to update her website regularly, organise the shippings, taxes and invoices, update the stock list, negotiate the prices and keep contact with magazines which are interested in presenting her outfits in their editorials. Dana also creates the concepts and designs of the collections by herself.  They are made of plant-based, cruelty-free and environmentally friendly fabrics, all produced in Europe. Dena describes that for small brands, such as Noumeno”, it is not always easy to find sustainable factories in Europe which have relatively low minimum order quantities. While launching her vegan brand in the fashion market she also noticed the difficulty to find a good balance between being sustainable and producing high-quality, durable fashion, but still offering seasonal, trendy garments in the way that stores request it nowadays.

 

Photo 2

Noumenon’s simply elegant showroom invites to try on the new collection.

 

During her working day, the young entrepreneur enjoys meeting interesting new clients and inspiring people working in the sustainable industry. Dena has the impression that the sustainable industry is less competitive than the fast fashion industry. Brands support each other and are often open for collaborations.

 

In April, her brand Noumenon will open a pop-up store in downtown Los Angeles. In the future, Dena can imagine to open her own retail store. Moreover, she would like to launch her first menswear collection in the upcoming years.

 

We are curious to follow the further successful development of Dena’s brand Noumenon. The story of Noumenon is just beginning!

 

Photo 3 (1)

The lookbooks of the previous two collections.

The post Veganism meets fashion appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
“Individualism is so passé” http://amfi.nl/individualism-is-so-passe/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 17:11:10 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19423 When somebody from the audience speaks up…and everybody suddenly has a moment to breathe, to hide the sudden uncertainty that is slowly creeping up in everybody. At the MOW exhibition […]

The post “Individualism is so passé” appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

When somebody from the audience speaks up…and everybody suddenly has a moment to breathe, to hide the sudden uncertainty that is slowly creeping up in everybody. At the MOW exhibition at the ByAMFI Store past Saturday, this instance was quickly swept away by an AMFI lecturer who applauded and payed respect to the student body for the future driven thoughts they have been sharing. Nobody expected the discussion to be as connecting as it finally turned out. Students as well as the industry professionals engaged into a discussion about the changing industry and the increasing value of collaboration.

 

Article by second Year International Fashion & Management Student Annika Langhammer.

 

IMG_1998klein

The organisation team of the MOW exhibition. Photography by Ecaterina Vasilieva.

 

Besides a lot of critique on the current educational system as well as the broken industry, light has been shining on topics such as existing collaborative initiatives. According to Agnes, a third year branding student at AMFI, there are already strong examples in the industry. She has been part of the Copenhagen Fashion Summit and sees a huge potential in collaboration to empower each other to collectively strive for the better.

 

Yennhi, a second year Fashion & Management student, shared her experience from her participation in the Creative Women Collective in Amsterdam. Through organised events, especially women can meet like-minded people and learn as well as grow together. It is incredible how women from different industries can meet each other there, and instead of competing with each other, collaborate to become stronger.

 

Platforms to reach out and connect do exist in great numbers and are already embedded in our daily lives. Looking at Instagram for example, many of us use it, but more to showcase our lives and what inspires us. Therefore, the way of using these platforms needs to be changed. Up until now, it has not been taken full advantage of the purpose of these platforms.  It is on each of us whether we use this opportunity, but the base for collaboration is already set.

 

30742661_2101347213428192_3510264508889169920_o

Photography Ecaterina Vasilieva.

 

Everybody who was present at the ByAMFI Store on Saturday felt the urge for change. We are the next generation entering the industry and we strive for a collective change. MOW generated a great platform to realise the power of collaboration which will be essential to collectively strive for the future we imagine. Collaboration is a process that happens organically, which should not scare us of to take initiative in our daily lives.

The post “Individualism is so passé” appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Lights ON! Spotlight on Creative Processes http://amfi.nl/lights-spotlight-creative-processes/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 17:05:15 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19417 Last Saturday the MOW exhibition drew many curious visitors to the ByAMFI Store. Three students from Branding, Design and Management showcased their creative process in projects besides and within AMFI. […]

The post Lights ON! Spotlight on Creative Processes appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Last Saturday the MOW exhibition drew many curious visitors to the ByAMFI Store. Three students from Branding, Design and Management showcased their creative process in projects besides and within AMFI.  Their work was presented in engaging wall-covering process book-like installations. Videos invited visitors to listen to the driving forces behind the creation process. Live illustrations captured visitors and allowed a personal experience of art creation first hand. The highlight of the day, were three panel discussions which gave insight into thoughts and struggles behind the creation process as well as their ambition from a young professional within the fashion industry. For those who were not able to come, the organisational team of the exhibition made sure that it was streamed on Instagram Live Stories.

 

Article by second Year International Fashion & Management Student Annika Langhammer.

 

30740336_2101344796761767_7630652040120631296_o

Strong female lead at the first panel discussion at MOW! Photography by Ecaterina Vasilieva.

 

Not only did the artsy installations gave a look behind the scenes, but even more personal insight was given during the first panel discussion of the day. Different topics, such as the emotional process, struggles and self-exploration as a way of self-expression, have been touched on.

 

How to start a working process? Find the abstract space and transform it into something tangible. According to Ksenia, second year designer student, designing is an emotional process which will finally be expressed through emotional exhibitionism. Her designs are a pure show of emotions presented without any shame. For her, the source of inspiration clearly is derived from the same abstract space, no matter if you are a technical or a creative person.

 

Other members of the panel agreed that emotions do play a big role in a creative process. It is especially important to be emotionally attached to the starting point of your project as that will be your driving force when encountering issues along the way. Magda, a second year branding student, talked about her experiences of encountering disappointments during the process. She learned to value the importance of mistakes due to a great source of inspiration. They serve as a trigger for even more creative energy which lead to a stronger end product. Especially the hard moments during the project will give you so much more in the end.

 

Another interesting point that came up during the panel discussion was creating products without having the means that students sometimes would love to have. Result: that would simply be too easy and a lot of our creativity would be wasted. Asher, a second year design student, considers the lack of money as an exciting challenge as he enjoys the beauty of the limitation. That is what ultimately triggers the creative process and in the long run will also support sustainable thinking. Ksenia said: ‘Another person’s trash becomes my treasure’.

 

The exhibition turned out to be a big success and definitely kicked off the urge for further inspirational and interactive events. Let’s see what comes up next… STAY EXCITED is the hint we, as the Amfi.nl Team, can give you!!

 

MOW_Collageklein

Collage by Annika Langhammer. Photography by Ecaterina Vasilieva.

The post Lights ON! Spotlight on Creative Processes appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
What about the AMFI Master? http://amfi.nl/what-about-the-amfi-master/ Sun, 22 Apr 2018 16:41:10 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19413 “It is motivating as hell, because you actually care about what you learn.”   Today, we have a chat with the twenty-year-old Constantin Whale, who’s born in Germany but lived […]

The post What about the AMFI Master? appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

“It is motivating as hell, because you actually care about what you learn.”

 

Today, we have a chat with the twenty-year-old Constantin Whale, who’s born in Germany but lived in Vancouver, Toronto, Switzerland and now Amsterdam. Together with his business partner, Kick van Doorn they created the creative platform Skandl. We talk about the master’s programme, about Skandl and he shares his tips & tricks for those who are  considering applying for the Master’s programme.
Article by third year Fashion & Branding student An-Sofie Vandecruys.

 

Constantin and a mate working @byAMFI

During an event which they organised at the byAMFI store.

 

So, Constantin, could you tell us something more about your background and why you chose for the AMFI Master programme?

I was studying sociology and I actually didn’t want to do anything with sociology. The only thing that kept it interesting for me was doing research. I was already working in fashion, for a contemporary menswear brand, and through that I connected with a lot of people within the industry. Entrepreneurship was something that I was always enthusiastic about and I knew that one day I wanted to have my own business, my own company. So, I started doing research on what I wanted to do next. Should I find a job or look for a study that offers something to me, in the direction of fashion and entrepreneurship? I somewhat stumbled upon the AMFI master’s programme. Surprisingly, it was kinda exactly what I was looking for. Because of my sociology background I didn’t want to do a theoretically masters with a lot of theory and research. Also, the fact that you have to start your own company was for me a very positive factor.  

Thus you applied and subsequently created Skandl. What is it and for whom?

Skandl is a creative platform, a service. It exists out of two sections. Firstly, there’s the commercial side, the digital agency. We provide digital strategy, which includes marketing, digital branding and contact strategy. We create a lot of media content, like lookbooks, videos, and photoshoots. Besides that, we do also content production and engagement marketing. That’s how Skandl generates revenue.

 

For example, we are now building a guide for small, sustainable brands to really communicate the values of sustainability, so they don’t have to use the common narrative of sustainability. We want these brands to communicate in a way that is cool and actually speaks to the people that don’t necessary care only about sustainability.

 

Secondly, which is a special thing we developed, is our creative network. This is where we try to find and support creators whether these are designers, producers, illustrators, graphic designers, photographers, etc. By giving them a platform and a commercial opportunity.

 

And what about the Master programme, what’s your experience?

It is a very multidisciplinary programme, because we are with a lot of people from different backgrounds who do different things. So they had to find a way to make all the information useful for all of us. The programme is divided between service and product. If your company is delivering a product than you follow classes in supply chain management. These are obviously not useful for me, so that is one distinction within the Master. It’s an interactive programme and the fact that we exist of a small group makes doing workshops easier and are also able to help each other. We think about scenarios with the teachers that we can apply to our company. It’s not boring at all, you actually want to go to class because you know you’re going to learn something useful. It is motivating as hell. And you care, you actually care about what you learn because everything you learn in class, you can apply to your own company.

 

In regards to the company, it has to be fashion and sustainable. You start with the Master thinking you have the idea that you want to execute, but it involves so much more. They encourage you to do a lot of research, which is nice because the idea I started with is nothing like what it is now, it is always changing, you know. But that keeps it interesting too.

 

It’s not only about you and your company, you have to help each other out and everyone you meet through these people. The Master acts like a safety net, they guide you, have a lot of expertise, a lot of connections. The teachers have maybe already failed for you which allows you to speed up things, because if I just moved here and I didn’t meet the people that I did whether it is through AMFI or the teacher network, I probably wouldn’t be where I am now and how my company has evolved.

 

You talk a lot about your company. It sounds like you get a lot of freedom within the programme, how’s that?

Of course, it is still a Master and you have to do certain assignments. Because it is an accredited programme, there are requirements. Sometimes you’re stuck in between. Like, do I focus on this now or put all my effort in my company and projects that you don’t get marks for? Sometimes you have to make a choice. It feels like you’re working two full time jobs but after awhile you get used to it.

 

And another thing I learned during the masters is a lot of entrepreneurs say don’t sleep, work like crazy, and don’t go socializing. But I don’t agree with that. If you’re in this kind of industry, like fashion, like music, you have to go out. That’s how you connect and meet people of the industry. It’s about finding the right balance and keeping things exciting.

 

The Master programme is fairly new. Was there room for feedback?

Yes, sure. Because we are the first years of the Master programme, it is still evolving and growing. We give feedback to the teachers so they can improve it for the next generations. We’ve already come up with some things than can be improved. The team of teachers is really proactive and changing things for the better, seeing what’s working and what’s not. I think that’s important to like to help them out.

 

And I wish we had class in the AMFI building as well, to connect also with the students from the Bachelor programme, as they may be maybe your target audience or you could network with the teachers. I would easier ask a teacher what they think because they’re all experts in the industry; it would be more useful for all of us I think.

 

And last but not least, would you encourage people to follow the Master programme?

Yes, if you want to start your own company, and if you have the drive to do your own thing, for sure. If you’re just doing it to get another degree, definitely not, just go get another degree instead. You should really care about the company that you’re starting and how this Master is going to be a tool to get there. I don’t think anyone in the program looks at it, like ‘oh I want to get a degree’. Everyone is very focussed on how this will help their businesses, and that is the main objective of the masters and it definitely should be.

 

Do you have tips or key advice for people who are thinking about starting their own business and applying for the programme?

I know this will sound cliché but pick something that you can see yourself doing everyday. You must want to think about everyday because you will end up thinking about it and working on it everyday. I am thinking about things related to my own company all day long. Also, don’t only think about it, but talk about it to other people as well. Don’t think of it as like this special idea that only you have and that someone would want to steal it, because that’s not the reality. The company is eventually going to become what it is, because of how you execute your idea. If someone else had your idea it would look totally different.

 

Don’t be scared to get feedback from people and share and talk about your idea. Also don’t be so set on that one idea, it’s just an idea and it will evolve and change. You should be open to change, and be flexible, especially within the Master programme because you’re going to get feedback all the time from people who really know what they’re talking about and work in the industry or have their own company. They will give you feedback and what you think will work, might not, so you’ll have to adapt it. Those are the main three things that are important, even if you would want to start your business without going through the programme, these are some things you should really consider.

 

For more information:

@skandl

http://createskandl.com/

The post What about the AMFI Master? appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
“More than dressing well and shopping” http://amfi.nl/dressing-well-shopping/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 17:37:31 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19391 Almost every AMFI student has already been confronted with the stereotypes that fashion students are often associated with. But we all know that fashion universities are much more than places […]

The post “More than dressing well and shopping” appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Almost every AMFI student has already been confronted with the stereotypes that fashion students are often associated with. But we all know that fashion universities are much more than places where we only talk about dressing and shopping. Instead, fashion schools, such as AMFI, provide an inspiring working environment where lots of diverse talents work together and share their unique ideas. 

 

Second year Fashion and Branding student Esther Kroes showcases this diversity of fashion students. In her exhibition “MOW – Manner of Working”, which will take place at the byAMFI studio this Saturday, the 14th of April, she offers us an insight into the passionate creative working process and vision of 40 AMFI students. Today, I had the chance to meet Esther and talk with her about the idea behind this exhibition and her own motivation. 

 

Article by first year International Fashion & Branding student Janna Hämpke.

 

IMG_5656

Esther Kroes by Ecaterina Vasilieva, second year Fashion and Branding student.

 

Hi Esther, thank you for coming and taking your time for this interview just a few days before the exhibition. I would love to know more about the background of this exhibition. What did inspire you to organise it? 

I started with this project when I worked for amfi.nl as a social media editor. I came up with the idea to photograph AMFI students to showcase their personal world and show what they look like. The idea was to break through the stereotypical visions of AMFI students. On instagram, I asked AMFI students if they would like to present their outfit of the day, and other students to take photos of them. The first photographer I worked with was Anna Dovgopolaya, a first year Fashion and Design student. While the first project was going on, I saw the photos of Anna and I was surprised by the high quality of her work – everything looked so good. I was convinced that I have to do more with these amazing photos. So I got the idea to showcase them in an exhibition. I talked to Flora van den Berg, the editor-in-chief of amfi.nl and the guys from the byAMFI studio and we made the decision to organise an exhibition in collaboration with byAMFI. That was the start of this project. With the help and creative energy of four Editorial team members of amfi.nl, Emma Smit, Leonie Miller-Aichholz, Marissa Muijselaar and Zoë Akihary, I finally created the exhibition during the last month. So, my very first idea turned out into a big collaboration.

 

How would you describe the core idea of the final exhibition? 

First, the core idea was to showcase the diversity of AMFI students. But then I decided to focus on their thoughts and ambition as well. In the end, the exhibition is all about showcasing the process of creating thinking of AMFI students.  I want to highlight their vision, mission, and passion, as I think that these are the key drivers for successful work. The most important thing of a person is their energy, their spirit, their ambition, their thinking process and not specifically their skills. You can always develop your skills over time but your energy and your vision are the things which are the fuel to start with. And that’s exactly what I want to present in the exhibition. Moreover, I want to create a networking event where AMFI students can meet up and see what other students’ potentials are. I also would like to show the talents of fashion students to the outside world. We, as fashion students, are more than dressing well and shopping. I think that we are diverse creative thinkers who have a passion for a broad variety of subjects and who love to research, explore the world around us and to educate ourselves. It is time to showcase that diversity and our distinctive energetic characteristics !

 

Would you mind giving us a small glimpse into the program of Saturday? 

On Saturday, we will organise some panel discussions about the creative working process, creative thinking and the competitiveness of the fashion industry. We would like to connect students to each other and to show the world where our true potentials are and what keeps us going on. Some AMFI students will give us a glimpse into their way of thinking and into their way of managing their own work. We also showcase their personal process they do besides AMFI on the walls. Some of them are already creative directors or brand directors and it is interesting to see how they manage their creative process. The focus of the exhibition lies on showcasing the creative process behind the end result – something that is hardly discussed while there is put so much energy, effort and emotions in. We also display a video where five AMFI students talk about their vision, mission and their point of view on competitiveness in the fashion industry. Moreover, we will publish a magazine which deals with the personal story of 40 AMFI students. Saturday will be a nice time to meet each other and to talk to each other. We want to show that we are talented colleagues, not competitors. We showcase the beauty of working together on an emotional and creative level! There is a DJ, there are drinks and hopefully, there is a great atmosphere. Everybody is welcome to join us.

 

The exhibition “MOW- Manner of Working” will take place at the byAMFI store on Saturday, the14th of April, from 12am to 9pm.

The post “More than dressing well and shopping” appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Technology is transforming the fashion industry http://amfi.nl/technology-transforming-fashion-industry/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 12:07:39 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19383 Encouraged by the growing interest of industry and students in the combination of digital and physical creation, AMFI and the Lectoraat of Fashion&Technology organised the event “Hybrid Fashion Symposium” on […]

The post Technology is transforming the fashion industry appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

Encouraged by the growing interest of industry and students in the combination of digital and physical creation, AMFI and the Lectoraat of Fashion&Technology organised the event “Hybrid Fashion Symposium” on Thursday the 29th March.

 

Article by Melina Pfaff, first year International Fashion & Management student and Esther Kroes, second year International Fashion & Branding student.

 

Within the framework of an inspirational and interactive day, the Swedish fashion company Atacac presented their thoughts on new ways to design, sell and produce in order to digitalise the fashion world. Moreover, AMFI students explained their work and experiments with 3D design as well as their opinions on the challenges and possibilities of technical development in the fashion industry. The event offered a lot of space to discuss and exchange ideas and visions with each other, and gave the possibility to participate in workshops about Creative Thinking and Kinetic Garment Construction, led by Jimmy Herdberg and Rickhard Lindqvist, the founders of Atacac.  

 

The fashion world is changing. Technological advances are being pushed to the limit. New developments provoke to think outside the box in order to come up with new solutions. The company Atacac is exploring the borderline between the virtual and the physical garment.

 

Processed with VSCO with kk1 preset

Presentation from Atacac.

 

Jimmy Herdberg’s background as a digital creative combined with Rickhard Lindqvist’s development of Kinetic Garment Construction, an alternative model to the static pattern making matrix, offers to explore new possibilities in the field of fashion and technology. They see their company as an ongoing fashion experiment – a laboratory to provide research free for everyone to benefit from it.

 

With the help of their software programme CLO, they are able to virtually shift designs, including their physical properties of fabric, to our screens in three-dimensional appearance. When Rickhard Lindqvist and Jimmy Herdberg founded Atacac, they aimed to make the digital world more attractive. Following they came up with new ways to display garments online. By adding movement and music to the avatars, which show their clothing online, they succeeded in presenting the digital fashion world in a very innovative and creative way. Besides their ideas on presenting garments, they also came up with completely new ways on how to produce, price and sell items.

 

Atacac presents a specific business model, including local manufacturing with short production cycles and on demand production. By offering the possibility to pre-order items on their website for a cheaper price, they can limit overproduction and stock keeping and thereby enable transparency and sustainability.

 

Bring your own lunch and share your thoughts (1)

Bring your own lunch and share your thoughts.

 

The Amfi students Marlies Reukers, Kim Schoenmakers, Marjolijn Ebbers and Franziska Hilbert are also experimenting with the possibilities of 3D experiences. Marlies explained how she discovered a new way of working during the Hypercraft/VR-Experience minor and how technology enables to experiment with the ways of presenting garments. Kim focused on the response of consumers on the integration of the digital experiences in physical stores. Marjolijn talked about her work in the field of product development in 3D sampling, where she specialised in knitwear, whilst Franziska researches the impact and implementation of 3D body scanning within the fashion industry.

 

They all see huge possibilities of improvement and development of the future fashion world.

 

3D technologies come with a lot of benefits, such as production savings regarding time as well as textile waste and pollution. Nevertheless, there are some questions remaining. Is the customer ready for the new virtual shopping experience? Which kinds of opportunities do come with it, especially regarding career and education? And how does technology challenge the existing structures of the fashion industry?

 

The Atacac founders see it as the biggest challenge for online stores to increase online sales and at the same time decrease returns. The students explained that garments often do not look the same in real-life as they are presented online. Moreover every garment looks different on everyone and the fit can turn out differently than expected. This is the reason why Atacac is currently working on ideas how they can offer customers to try on garments virtually when shopping online.

 

Furthermore, the students talked about the customer’s experience when shopping online and the role of the brick-and-mortar stores in the future. They observed the current development of people being more and more online than ever before. Following they see the importance for a company to sell where the people are – online. The Atacac founders aim to create a better experience virtually than physically, because they claim that people nowadays are getting less interested in material things in general. People are more into technology – fashion will become technology.

 

Even though online shopping is really convenient and technical developments constantly improve the online shopping experience, Kim mentioned that face-to-face retail still has the advantage of the tactile experience and the physical relationship between product and consumer. In this regard brick-and-mortar stores might get the function of a museum.

 

All present AMFI students talked about the endless possibilities which their creative work offered – a new career perspective as well as the freedom of developing their interest and strengthen their identity. They feel the urge to set out their path on their own whilst exploring the hybrid world of technology and fashion. According to them, the role as a professional in the future of fashion can completely depend on who you are as an individual, your working process, your experiments and ideas. Technology, AR as well as VR experiences, will have huge impact on future developments. The students suggest being open-minded and teaming up with people from all specialties in order to grow and develop within the industry.  

 

Presentatie workshops_kinetic pattern design (1)

Presentation from the workshop Kinetic Garment Construction.

 

During the afternoon of the event, the Atacac founders invited to take part in two workshops – one on Creative thinking and one on Kinetic garment construction. The Creativity workshop led by Jimmy Herdberg concentrated on creative problem solving using the ‘Six Hat Method’. The method helps to look at problems from all points of view – Information, Optimism, Judgement, Feelings, Creativity, Thinking. This practice forced everyone to move outside their habitual thinking style and helped to learn new ways of opening the mind to new solutions. Additionally the workshop participants discussed new ways to experience virtuality combined with reality and talked about ideas, such as touching fabric with your eyes.

 

The other workshop led by Rickhard Lindqvist focussed on his innovation of Kinetic garment construction, an alternative pattern cutting method using as its point of origin the actual body instead of a static matrix. Within this workshop, participants draped one rectangular piece of fabric and worked with the variable body as well as the direction of the skin to create garments. They combined movements and breaking points of the body in order to create patterns based on how the body works. During discussions, the students agreed, that this way of pattern making should be introduced in the early stages of design degrees as an alternative to traditional pattern cutting and that designers, pattern cutters and developer will have to come together and collaborate into more technical directions.

 

During the Hybrid Fashion Symposium event, Atacac provided us with a glimpse of advanced technical developments, which have huge potential to be evolved in the future. AMFI students demonstrated what kind of impressive projects may emerge when the creative side as well as the technical and commercial one come together. On demand production and Virtual and Augmented Reality promise a more innovative and more sustainable world. Atacac has great plans for the future of fashion technology and aspires to further develop the physical as well as the virtual combination of product and experience. In fact, the increasingly personal nature of online shopping is going to create a new challenge for retailers – and a new opportunity.

We will open our eyes for new ideas and diversity. Technology is transforming the fashion industry.

The post Technology is transforming the fashion industry appeared first on AMFI.

]]>
Why did he come back? http://amfi.nl/why-did-he-come-back/ Tue, 10 Apr 2018 10:45:51 +0000 http://amfi.nl/?p=19373 For the sake of creativity, we decided to introduce you to a blog in a style that’s not only aesthetically pleasing, but also matches with the topic of the blog: […]

The post Why did he come back? appeared first on AMFI.

]]>

For the sake of creativity, we decided to introduce you to a blog in a style that’s not only aesthetically pleasing, but also matches with the topic of the blog: Martin Margiela.

 

Text and visuals by Noémie Ninot, first year International Fashion & Branding.

 

Binder1_Page_03_KLEIN

 

Binder1_Page_02_KLEIN

 

Binder1_Page_01_KLEIN

 

Binder1_Page_13_KLEIN

 

Binder1_Page_08_KLEIN

 

Binder1_Page_05_KLEIN

The post Why did he come back? appeared first on AMFI.

]]>